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Help me make my decision with Trek Domane

Old 05-22-20, 04:18 PM
  #1  
carferna
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Help me make my decision with Trek Domane

I used to be a occasional rider but, lately have taken up to cycling. I purchased an ebike last year that I ride for fun. I bought the ebike on a whim without having ridden one before. When I got it, it wasn't as fun as I thought. Bike is too heavy to ride in manual mode(about 60 lbs). Long story short...I am in the market this year for a new bike that is comfortable and light. I do like road bikes but don't like the aggressive riding stance of the typical road bike. I think I have narrowed the bike that I want and I steering more towards Trek because I get additional financial incentives. I found the Trek Domane to be in the category of what I am looking for especially because of it's non aggressive riding geometry. First question, do i buy a size lower than recommended so I can keep myself more upright when riding? I am 5'11" that is a size 56 but I feel I will be more comfortable with a size 54. The Aluminum Domane AL2 seems also as light as the carbon domane SL4 or SL5. I know the AL2 has a lower grade shimano gear system compared to the SL. I really don't change my gears as frequently as the Pro's would so I don't care too much about the shifting. But once it is seating on a gear I want it being very smooth. Additionally, the SL has the ISO speed which the AL2 does not have. I need you folks to tell me how much difference does the ISO speed really make? Does it make a significance difference if you are riding on the side walk and you hit those concrete joints. I casually ride so speed to me is not a priority. Eventually, would like to do group rides, so am needing a descent bike. Right now, I am leaning more on SL4 or SL5 but haven't really got an opportunity to ride any bike because stores are no longer doing test rides in this Covid climate. For the folks out there, that have ridden these bikes, tell me your experience. If you are the Plano, TX area and would like to swap with my ebike for a day or two let me know.
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Old 05-22-20, 04:54 PM
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Mulberry20
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You are way too tall for a 54 my girlfriend rides a 54 and she is 5í7.
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Old 05-22-20, 05:03 PM
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Gconan
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Buy the correct size. Get the idea of buying the incorrect size out of your head, with all due respect.
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Old 05-22-20, 05:23 PM
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I'm 5'10" and ride a 56cm. A 54 will be twitchy on the downhills.

If you want to be more upright, get a 90mm stem.
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Old 05-22-20, 05:28 PM
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bigd777
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you want 56cm
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Old 05-22-20, 05:36 PM
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I'm 5'9" and ride a 56 cm.
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Old 05-22-20, 05:41 PM
  #7  
biker128pedal
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If you think you may want to use it for trips to the store check a Checkpoint.
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Old 05-22-20, 05:53 PM
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You can get riser handlebars that makes you very upright. I have 9 inches but even 4 would do a huge amount for most people. You may be able to get it as an option.
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Old 05-22-20, 07:01 PM
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I think there is a big difference between the AL3 and the SL4/5. The ISO speed does make a difference in the comfort of that bike. If you test drive them, you will feel it immediately. Just because there is a difference doesn't mean it is better. Some people don't like having the ISO Speed and others like myself, purchased the bike because of the comfort factor using ISO Speed.

If you decide that the comfort is worth it to you then that narrows down your decision on which model. Personally I would go with the SL4 but it is easy to spend someone else's money.

As others have pointed out, the 56cm is the size you want. You may in the short term feel that the 54 is the right size because it feels better/safer or however you describe it but it would be a big mistake. After that initial phase you will find the bike cramped and too small as you become more accustomed to a road bike.

Happy shopping.
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Old 05-22-20, 07:53 PM
  #10  
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Piling on now, but Iím 6í and happily ride a 56 Domane.

Changing gears is not a pro thing. Youíre going to use them.
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Old 05-23-20, 05:25 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by carferna View Post
I really don't change my gears as frequently as the Pro's would so I don't care too much about the shifting
I don't know how often pros shift, but learning how to be in the right gear at the right time will greatly improve your ride experience. It takes time but soon you will shift without even thinking about it. Depending on where you ride you may not need the whole range, but shifting to keep a fairly constant cadence most of the time makes my rides more enjoyable. Lots of hills here and I use nearly every combination of gears on a typical ride.

The bike shop shop may offer a fitting service, it is well worth the investment. Some even do it for free with a bike purchase.
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Old 05-24-20, 09:21 AM
  #12  
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I'm 5.9 and ride a Trek Emonda ALR6 and Trek Domane AL2 both size 54 but with relative long legs I'm in between a 54/56. Regarding a new Trek Domane AL2 my experience changing gears is very positive and no issue at all even if I'm "spoiled" with the Ultegra components on the Emonda. The weight on the Domane is another story.
Best of luck with what you choose.
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Old 05-24-20, 09:35 AM
  #13  
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Use the Domane sizing chart on Trek's web site to determine your proper fit rather than take advice from strangers who may or may not even own a Domane.

Having owned several Domane's (of which I currently ride a 2020 SL7), I'd go for the carbon frame over the aluminum. Carbon is lighter, has internally routed cables, and can be designed to be flexible in one direction while rigid in another which maximized the effect of the ISO decoupler. I can only guess Trek offers an aluminum Domane to hit a price point. I don't think aluminum is a good material for a bike frame that is supposed to flex by design. Also, you'd be missing-out on the spiffy down-tube storage compartment if you went with the aluminum bike.

If you're not shifting gears, you either live where it's very flat or you have a bit of learning to do with bicycling. Gears are there for your riding comfort. If they aren't shifting right, which they likely won't once you've ridden the bike a few miles and the shift cables stretched, take the bike to the bike shop for a tune-up or watch one of the many YouTube videos on how to tune your own bike.
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Old 05-24-20, 02:14 PM
  #14  
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Once I counted how many time I shifted gears on a short trip I make fairly regularly and was surprised myself by the high number. But that's rolling hills countryside with a longer steeper hill thrown in. Not shifting much may also mean you don't spin enough and ride heavy gears as a rule.

I never measured my rpms, closest to cyclo computer is my phone for gps tracking speed and elevation besides mapping but I am aware I used to not spin enough. Just yesterday while walking on a sidewalk, I saw someone on a fancy bike passing by, the road was flat and with normal traffic, so you ride just to get someplace where you begin to ride more like for sport, but even so, he was cranking at ridiculously low rpms in some high gear. It makes me cringe just the look of it, I hope I don't look like that myself at times. But opposite is just as ridiculous, when you see someone hyper spinning like a squirrel at low speed in low gear, both are aesthetically unappealing to say the least, besides being un-efficient (except when Froome does it LOL). But I digress.

Last edited by vane171; 05-24-20 at 02:18 PM.
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Old 05-24-20, 08:24 PM
  #15  
PoorInRichfield
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Originally Posted by vane171 View Post
Once I counted how many time I shifted gears on a short trip I make fairly regularly and was surprised myself by the high number. But that's rolling hills countryside with a longer steeper hill thrown in. Not shifting much may also mean you don't spin enough and ride heavy gears as a rule.
Side note... with the Di2 wireless adaptor and a head unit like a Garmin 830 (the setup I have on my Domane SL7), it'll tell you exactly how many times you shifted your front and rear derailleur on a ride. I'm not sure if that's useful info, but it certainly is neat!
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Old 05-24-20, 11:43 PM
  #16  
vane171
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Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
Side note... with the Di2 wireless adaptor and a head unit like a Garmin 830 (the setup I have on my Domane SL7), it'll tell you exactly how many times you shifted your front and rear derailleur on a ride. I'm not sure if that's useful info, but it certainly is neat!
Well, its useful if you need to justify shopping for new bike, like to your family or relatives, who tell you, why would you need new one... and I tell them, with down tube shifters the old way, I need to shift this many times just to come visit you
And so much shifting gears will be so much easier with the new technology, like indexing and electric like Di2 or even wireless eTap that shifts the front for you all by itself...

If I would get either Di2 or eTap system, I'd certainly buy Garmin or something and set it to show which gear I am in, I think that would be neat to see up ahead that you are running out of gearing options when going up hill. As it is, I often look down only to see that alas, this is the best it will get.
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Old 05-25-20, 05:48 AM
  #17  
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I bought a Domane SL6 in 2017, based on my leg length I went with 54cm. The ISOspeed is definitely noticeable - I could tell that in my test rides and now with over 6,000 miles on it I'm still loving it.
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Old 07-11-20, 08:37 AM
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I was stuck between the Domane and the Roubaix and in the end, went with the Roubaix. The bike comes next Friday, exciting. It depends on a lot of factors. Your age, your phhsical condition, your riding style, distance, etc. I am moving on in age and I like to do long-distance rides so I like to have comfort. Both the ISO speed and the Future Shock are good at blocking out the road vibrations but I decided to go with the Roubaix. For compliance, best is still riding bigger tires. I also have a BMC Roadmachine X in aluminum and using 32x700 pumped to about 4 bars, the ride is fantastic.

Also for size.... I am 5'9" and I have the 51 in BMC (they are weird in sizing) and 54 in Specialized but a 56 also fits me. Your Domane should be at least 56 for 5'11".

In terms of the drive train, it depends on how serious you are about biking and how many miles you will put on and how hilly is your area. My BMC is fitted with a SRAM Rival 1x 44. My chainring is 44 and the cassette is 10-42. For flat topography, it works perfectly. For hilly places, it feels gappy from time to time so my Roubaix is with a compact in the front and 11-34 on the back.
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Old 07-11-20, 03:34 PM
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watch the seat post.

I recently purchased an SL5. At 5'9" the seat post on the 54cm was a tad short . The 56 felt a little bit long for reach at first but now seems perfect. Surprisingly the seat post is nearly maxed out? A longer seat post was said by someone on the forum here to run $275.00 bucks. Just something to pay close attention to if even considering going smaller. On the matter of carbon fiber vs aluminum for this particular model it is of no use to compare as the bikes are of a totally different build, not even just a different material choice, why they chose to name them as such is beyond me. The carbon fiber model does a wonderful job of smoothing out chip seal and the less than perfect roads I ride. The iso suspension will help on the sidewalks you had mentioned. Big hits are still big hits but general road chatter, cracks and chip seal seem to be at least muted nicely which at fifty nine is why I had decided to try the Domane. The bike is versatile in its capabilities to run up to 38 tires and with lower pressure should just about be sublime as you could ask for in a road bike. Personally I prefer 32's for a balance of speed and handling while maintaining comfort for the road and the occasional foray off the beaten path. It just works for me. Hope you find what works for you, good-luck!
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Old 07-11-20, 03:39 PM
  #20  
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I don't think you'd be more upright on a 54, because, yeah, the top tube is shorter, but the head tube is also shorter, so to get the bar to the same height, you'd need a riser stem. The 56 is already 1.5 cm taller. If you don't want to stretch out, get a shorter stem.

The other question is, could you even get the saddle high enough on a 54?Looking at the chart, I would have a tough time fitting a 56, and I'm only half an inch taller than the OP. I'd have to use the tall seat mast, about 2 cm shy of minimum insertion.
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Old 07-11-20, 05:17 PM
  #21  
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I ride a stock 56cm 2018 Domane ALR 5 (Alum. frame with IsoSpeed, 105 groupset) and I'm 5'10". It fits extremely well.
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Old 07-11-20, 05:34 PM
  #22  
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Yeah at 5'11" like me you're between a 56 and a 58 on a Trek. Then inseam from there. I ended up buying a 56 after I rode both.
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Old 07-12-20, 08:55 AM
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I agree with those that say to buy the correct frame size using Trek's sizing chart. If you're in between, then you have some leeway.

If you want a higher riding position and more comfort then a road bike, Buy a hybrid. The faster ones can get pretty close to road bike speeds with much more comfort on poor roads, mup's or sidewalks. That's probably why they are so popular with recreational cyclist and comuters.

Theres also flat bar road bikes that are faster still, and off a relaxed riding position and a comfortable ride with their wider tires.

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Old 07-13-20, 07:29 AM
  #24  
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Start with measuring your inseam. Height alone can be very misleading. In my youth I was 5'10 1/2". I am now a tad under 5'9" in the morning. Then and now the perfect size for me is 54-55. Why? Because then and now my inseam is 32.5". Oh, and be careful with the manufacturer's sizing. My CAAD 12 is labeled a 52 but measuring it with a virtual TT it is actually a 54-55. That's due to the sloping TTs that predominate.

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