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My First and Last Endurance Bike.

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My First and Last Endurance Bike.

Old 06-05-20, 11:37 PM
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Brave99Heart
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My First and Last Endurance Bike.

Hi everyone, I would like your help in choosing my endurance bike. As the title suggests, I want to buy only one endurance bike that would last for years. An edurance bike end game. My budget is (5000 to 6500$) for the bike. I have these bikes in mind. BMC (Roadmachine O2 one), Giant (defy advanced pro), Colnago (V3), Wilier (Team gtr disc or cento1ndr disc), Rose (Reveal four disc), Bianchi (infinito cv), Pinarello (Price disc)and any other bike on your mind. PS. I live in an area with a lot of hills and flat lands. I prefer Shimano ultegra D12 groupset or any equivalent groupset. I am a beginner so your advice is much needed and appreciated.
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Old 06-06-20, 12:05 AM
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You say that you are a beginner, is this your first bike?

The majority of us on here have bought our "last" bike many times.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:00 AM
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
You say that you are a beginner, is this your first bike?

The majority of us on here have bought our "last" bike many times.
yes, I am a beginner. I have this habbit of buying an end game because I don't want nor like to think about upgrading or buying another bike.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:16 AM
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A Cervelo R series ain't on the list?

Harumph.

How about: Instead of a grail "endurance" bike, you ride a bike & become no longer a beginner & gain some endurance.

I so wish I could help you, but if you can't decide what you want among the listed options, anything I say/suggest is wasted pixles.

World class super bikes don't make you a better & more capable cyclist. Work on that. (I say this in an earnest & honest attempt to be helpful.)

Sorry.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Brave99Heart View Post
Hi everyone, I would like your help in choosing my endurance bike. As the title suggests, I want to buy only one endurance bike that would last for years. An edurance bike end game. My budget is (5000 to 6500$) for the bike. I have these bikes in mind. BMC (Roadmachine O2 one), Giant (defy advanced pro), Colnago (V3), Wilier (Team gtr disc or cento1ndr disc), Rose (Reveal four disc), Bianchi (infinito cv), Pinarello (Price disc)and any other bike on your mind. PS. I live in an area with a lot of hills and flat lands. I prefer Shimano ultegra D12 groupset or any equivalent groupset. I am a beginner so your advice is much needed and appreciated.
Is there a particular reason you've settled on a bicycle with endurance geometry?
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Old 06-06-20, 03:06 AM
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Brave99Heart
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Originally Posted by Ross520 View Post
Is there a particular reason you've settled on a bicycle with endurance geometry?
Yes. Since this is my first bike, I would like something comfortable for cruising. I am not a hardcore cyclist yet. I don't want an aggresdive bike right off the bat.
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Old 06-06-20, 03:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Brave99Heart View Post
Hi everyone, I would like your help in choosing my endurance bike........................................... I am a beginner so your advice is much needed and appreciated.
For my 67th birthday my wife bought me a 2018 Specialized Roubaix Expert. I enjoy the ride immensely and I am sure I would also enjoy riding any of the bikes on your short list so my suggestion is to ride each of those bikes and make your choice. Personal preferences are paramount when riding long distances and a good test ride might alert you to the different nuances of each model of bike allowing for a 1st and last selection. Pretty sure that you will have great rides on whatever you buy BUT not so sure it will be the last bike you buy.
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Old 06-06-20, 04:03 AM
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Ross520
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Originally Posted by Brave99Heart View Post
Yes. Since this is my first bike, I would like something comfortable for cruising. I am not a hardcore cyclist yet. I don't want an aggresdive bike right off the bat.
Racing frames can be very comfortable, given fit is correct, and you're running good rubber.

I would suggest some test-riding at your local bike shops. Try out a few race bikes and compare them to the endurance models.

Some folks (including myself) have less spinal issues in a more stretched-out, aero position. I can ride like that for many miles with no back or neck pain.
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Old 06-06-20, 04:28 AM
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Welcome to BF
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Old 06-06-20, 05:48 AM
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With all the bikes you have listed, it tells me you don't live in America. You don't list the typical Specialized, Trek, and Cannondale. Just an observation. I think choosing a bike that has a strong presence in the area you live is a good choice. If there is a problem there is a head office nearby.

Honestly when you get into that price range, every bike is good. Each one though will be slightly different and you will develop a preference, either ride wise or component configuration etc. This will be unique to you, what works for me may not be best for you. Your choice of endurance bike is also good. You have done your homework and you know what you want. You are way ahead of the game.

The only thing I would stay away from are any BB90 or Bright bottom brackets. Press fit can be problematic and they are getting phased out. For example my Trek is using a T47 which is a better system. Creaking bottom brackets are annoying and doing a Google search will show that are more common than not.

Test driving bikes will be the solution. The only bike that I would suggest because it is good value is Canyon Endurance. You can't test drive it unfortunately but you can return it before 30 days if you dislike it. No other bike company lets you do that.

Good luck with your choice.
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Old 06-06-20, 05:49 AM
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Brave99Heart
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Originally Posted by Ross520 View Post
Racing frames can be very comfortable, given fit is correct, and you're running good rubber.

I would suggest some test-riding at your local bike shops. Try out a few race bikes and compare them to the endurance models.

Some folks (including myself) have less spinal issues in a more stretched-out, aero position. I can ride like that for many miles with no back or neck pain.
Are racing bikes better than endurance bikes for what I want to do?
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Old 06-06-20, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by blakcloud View Post
With all the bikes you have listed, it tells me you don't live in America. You don't list the typical Specialized, Trek, and Cannondale. Just an observation. I think choosing a bike that has a strong presence in the area you live is a good choice. If there is a problem there is a head office nearby.

Honestly when you get into that price range, every bike is good. Each one though will be slightly different and you will develop a preference, either ride wise or component configuration etc. This will be unique to you, what works for me may not be best for you. Your choice of endurance bike is also good. You have done your homework and you know what you want. You are way ahead of the game.

The only thing I would stay away from are any BB90 or Bright bottom brackets. Press fit can be problematic and they are getting phased out. For example my Trek is using a T47 which is a better system. Creaking bottom brackets are annoying and doing a Google search will show that are more common than not.

Test driving bikes will be the solution. The only bike that I would suggest because it is good value is Canyon Endurance. You can't test drive it unfortunately but you can return it before 30 days if you dislike it. No other bike company lets you do that.

Good luck with your choice.
Do bike manufacturers list this in their bike specs? If not where can I find, for instance, what bracket system is used with Canyon endurance?
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Old 06-06-20, 06:26 AM
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Endurance bikes are very “in” now.

What is it about endurance bikes that interests you?
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Old 06-06-20, 06:30 AM
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You’re a beginner and are planning to spend $5k+ on a bike? And you really believe that you will choose a bike that will make you happy forever?

You’re more likely to just make an expensive mistake.
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Old 06-06-20, 06:31 AM
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If you really want to future proof you could get a recumbent trike. Toward the end of your riding days you could add an E motor!
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Old 06-06-20, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
You’re a beginner and are planning to spend $5k+ on a bike? And you really believe that you will choose a bike that will make you happy forever?

You’re more likely to just make an expensive mistake.
This.
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Old 06-06-20, 09:16 AM
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Mulberry20
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Originally Posted by Brave99Heart View Post
Do bike manufacturers list this in their bike specs? If not where can I find, for instance, what bracket system is used with Canyon endurance?
My suggestion for a first bike.

https://www.specialized.com/US/en/shop/bikes/road-bikes/performance-road-bikes/allez/c/allez?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI0d-8rr3t6QIVhZOzCh3m1wgAEAAYASAAEgLyGPD_BwE

How tall are you and how much do you weigh?
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Old 06-06-20, 09:24 AM
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https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes-contend-ar

Those two are more bike than you probably need.
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Old 06-06-20, 10:53 AM
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When you are ready to buy your last bike, go peruse the Lynskey or Litespeed site and pick one out. When I go buy carbon fiber fishing rod, I know it won't be my last.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
When you are ready to buy your last bike, go peruse the Lynskey or Litespeed site and pick one out. When I go buy carbon fiber fishing rod, I know it won't be my last.
I agree. Spending a bunch of money on a heavy, drab, outdated Ti bike would likely make most people quit cycling.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by rebel1916 View Post
I agree. Spending a bunch of money on a heavy, drab, outdated Ti bike would likely make most people quit cycling.
Yes, you rarely see beginners on Ti. Let's keep it as a sign of advanced and sophisticated taste. Carbon all the way for OP!
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Old 06-06-20, 01:52 PM
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Surly Long Haul Trucker in the largest frame size you can fit, so you can get the bars up even with the seat, or higher. Brooks Saddle or other leather saddle. I can ride it all day, 70 miles or so, then do it again the next day, and the next, and the next, and I am sure it will last until the day I die. That being said, I have a 1984 Ross Mt. Rainier in the garage I bought new. I am sure it will be around when I die as well, provided I continue to maintain it.

A $5000- $6500 endurance bike with Di2? Go for it. I am sure the slick Di2 system will work for another 30 or so years. Sounds like money well spent.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:52 PM
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I think you'd want with a bike that's pretty classic to start with. That will mean a bike that won't feel dated in a few short years.

Steel and mechanical shifters. Done correctly, even with disc brakes, you'll be at 18lbs including cages and pedals and it's not going to be much different in 20 years.

I would get a Ritte Satyr with mechanical Ultegra a hydraulic discs. The Mavic Open Pro rims on the best hubs you can afford. Finish it off with carbon and titanium bits. It'd be a sweet bike forever. And you'd have an endurance and gravel capable bike from the influence of a great American frame builder.

I have a three older steel road bikes. I can hang with everyone but the mid 20s racers. I don't think the finest modern road bike on the planet would help me catch those guys. I get compliments on every ride and I still pass a lot more than I get passed.

Think about it.
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Old 06-06-20, 02:41 PM
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With that kind of budget, you're going to get a great bike, regardless. The question is whether it will be the bike that you'll want to keep forever and I don't think anyone can answer that but you and being new to cycling, I don't think you have the knowledge to answer that even for yourself.

What bike you get depends so much on the kind of riding you do, where you go, how long, etc, and you may find that whatever you are thinking is important now is unimportant in 6 months. You may find you don't even like cycling. If you insist on going all in, I would just say to go ride as many bikes as you can and see what speaks to you and to look for a shop that you feel comfortable with. Make sure you get a bike fit included in the deal. Save money for good quality gear. Helmet, shorts, jerseys, lights, etc.

If your roads have poor pavement, I'd include the specialized Roubaix and Trek Domane in your list. Active suspension increases rider comfort significantly. I have a Roubaix comp Di2 and it's great for my purposes and way under your budget.
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Old 06-07-20, 01:05 PM
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I brought a vintage Motobecane into my local bike shop not long ago. Owner of the shop is a renowned frame builder. I mentioned that I was very pleased with the way the bike rode. He responded...well it's got pedals, wheels, handlebar, it should ride well. So basically a bike is a bike. If it's mechanically set up properly, it should provide a nice ride.

I pick my bikes by the way they look. The color, graphics, cool factor. The better the bike looks the more I will ride it. The more I ride the more fit and the more I like the bike. So it's all good. Of the bikes you have listed I would go with the one that most visually appeals to you.
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