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Bicycling isn't as fun with new bike

Old 06-13-20, 08:20 AM
  #1  
morgothaod
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Bicycling isn't as fun with new bike

I had a Trek Mountain Track 800 and I sold it and bought a Jamis Citizen 2. I wanted a more comfortable riding position. However, after riding the Citizen for awhile, I have found out that I really miss the mountain bike. I felt like I was "a part" of my bike on the mountain bike (Maybe it could be because it didn't have shock absorption or because I was a little lower to the ground); as opposed to just sitting on something and pedaling like the comfort bike. I also feel like I can go faster and be less tired on the mountain bike. Not sure if maybe I was just in better shape when I had the mountain bike because both bikes are 21 speed. Have you experienced the same thing going from one type of bike to another?


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Old 06-13-20, 08:37 AM
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A couple of thoughts. Is it possible that it is the old shoe syndrome? Old shoes can feel more comfortable than the new ones we just bought but eventually the new shoes become the old shoes. Very similar to what you already said. So no bike surprise.

Second it appears from the photos you have the contact points of each bike set differently. There is a higher reach to the bars in the new bike. If you still have the old bike I would try to mimic the contact points, seat and handlebars etc. You could probably get it closer to what you had to bring back that nostalgic feeling again.

I find going to from one bike to another makes me not like the bike I am riding. I like the last one. Then this has more to do with my inability to accept change. This pathology I learned to deal with. In time the bike that I am will grow on me.

Just give it time.
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Old 06-13-20, 08:41 AM
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The very upright riding position of comfort bikes is not conducive to speed, handling, or efficiency. It can be more comfortable for some folks with back problems but comfort bikes are not a great choice for seasoned cyclists. They also tend to put more weight and stress on your sit bones instead of spreading your body weight across them and your hands.
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Old 06-13-20, 08:49 AM
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It looks to me like the Jamis seat is a lot lower than the Trek's. Have you verified that you have exactly the same bottom bracket to your hip joint distance? If not, that would make a big difffence in perceived bike feel. (Different seats will locate you in different places so a simple bottom bracket to seat distance doesn't tell you what you need to know.) Also, are your cranks the same lenghts?

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Old 06-13-20, 08:55 AM
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Look at how your spine works and you see why an upright position is less comfortable when your spine has to absorb bumps.

"Comfort" bikes are for people who don't really ride much. There is a reason touring bikes are what they are, tourers ride many hours in relative comfort.
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Old 06-13-20, 08:57 AM
  #6  
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Yep. Raise the seat if possible and lower that stem. I'd replace riser handlebars and go flatbars. But that's just me. Maybe replace saddle to something narrower.
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Old 06-13-20, 09:09 AM
  #7  
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My experience going from a hard tail mountain bike to a comfort bike was just the opposite. There are way too many variables to generalize though.

My mountain bike was awful. Like riding a brick. After even a short ride my hands were numb and the my butt was aching.

This Giant Sedona is so pleasant to ride I feel I could ride it forever. I love the upright position putting me eye to eye with people driving pick up truck, a superb view of the surrounding area, and increased visability to drivers that also improves safety.

You must understand that these bikes are made for pleasure, not speed. That upright position makes them the most susceptible to wind resistance. Actualy worse then my mountain bike was. This is most noticeable going against a moderate or stronger wind. My perception is that it is slightly quicker then my mountain bike, But I'm using the same gears. Perhaps I do more exercise now. The 3 x 7 speed drivetrain though provides a gear for any situation.

When I was young (mid 1970's) I had a 10 speed 27" road bike. I don't mind telling you that bike was MUCH faster then either my mountain bike or my new comfort bike. Going down hill was almost scary. I bike for excersize and adventure now and my new (2018) comfort bike fits the bill. It's fine for short commutes too, But for longer commutes I'd recommend a quick hybrid type bike.

Give your new bike some time and as others suggest try making some adjustments. I tried lowering my handlebar but that brought back the problem I had with my mountain bike...numb hands. So I raised them back up. Tire pressure is important too. Too low pressure will make the bike squirm effecting handling and that connection to the road feeling.

Also it is important that the preload adjustment on both your seat and front forks be correct for your weight. I think I have the same suspension seatpost as you. IIRC it should be set to drop 3/8" when seated. Try 1/4" since you want to feel more connected to the road. Remember to adjust the seat height accordingly. I believe the front shocks should not bob with normal cruising. Again you can tighten up the preload to firm them up. They probably have a hydraulic lock out on top of one leg (The other leg will have the preload adjuster). Might be useful on smooth roads.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 06-13-20 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 06-13-20, 11:04 AM
  #8  
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If you still have the old MTB, play around with taller longer stems or even a stem riser. if you do not, shop around for an old used one, (rigid frame, mid-'80s on up) and when you see one that won't take a lot of money to be reliable, snap it up. There is nothing like options.

I did a pretty hard 40-mile ride (trying to keep up with a much faster rider (who slowed way down for me but was still too fast) on my race-geometry Workswell. When I got home my legs, but even more my hips and lower back ere killing me. The next day I hopped on my endurance-geometry Workswell, where I sit a lot more upright, and did another 40 miles without discomfort---the slower pace, coupled with the more relaxed riding position, made the second ride possible.

of course, now I find it hard to do 40 miles once in a weekend, but that is a different story .... The real story is ... if you still have the MTB, play with it. Adjust it to fit you better.

if you do not still have that bike, adjust the Jamis. There is nothing wrong with hat bike, and if you play around enough, you should be able to make if feel like a more comfortable version of the Trek. Likely it weighs more, and the fork adds some poundage and maybe steals a little snap form initial inputs, but it is still a solid bike. Adjust it to your needs and desires.

And consider replacing that Trek.
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Old 06-13-20, 11:11 AM
  #9  
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Nope. You either bought the wrong bike, or simply need to stop romanticizing about the old one and enjoy your new purchase.
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Old 06-13-20, 01:39 PM
  #10  
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The seat looks an inch lower to me. Probably because you didn't allow for the suspension seat post. I would chuck that ASAP.
And I agree the high HB affords ZERO leverage going up hills. As is, it is set up to go only 8 mph.
The new steep slope TTs are a horrible fad.
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Old 06-13-20, 02:47 PM
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I'm not surprised the new bike isn't fun. Have someone help with your fit. .
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Old 06-13-20, 02:52 PM
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I've been riding for approaching 60 years, but last year was the first time I can remember where I rode a bike where the handlebar was actually higher than the saddle. It was in the Yukon - a hybrid rental in a place with limited options.

Hill climbing performance was appalling due to the high bars, plus the porky mass of the bike (30 pounds). My first impression was I was so gassed and slow due to the altitude, but that wasn't the issue - it was the bike. The rental didn't even have a suspension fork, which would have added even more useless weight, indistinct steering, and energy-sapping suspension bob.

Worse was descending. A 20mph descent down a 1-mile 8% grade on smooth pavement was terrifying due to the fat knobby tires, and especially the high bars, which made the front end of the bike light and the steering sketchy.
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Old 06-13-20, 03:33 PM
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Great googly moogly those Jamis bars are high!
and what is that pouch connected to your bars...it looks like it would fit a full sized tablet.

As has been mentioned, make the new bike fit the same as the old. Its clearly a different fit based on those pictures.
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Old 06-13-20, 03:57 PM
  #14  
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Holy smokes, the Jamis looks like it is set up like a church pew or straight back chair. No way is that position good for speed or long term comfort. Comparing apples to rocks as far as I can see. The Trek is more the position for my interests.
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Old 06-13-20, 05:04 PM
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Yeah I can see how the new bike would be less fun than the old one
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Old 06-13-20, 09:16 PM
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morgothaod
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I don't have the Trek to compare the seat heights but to me it feels like the seat is the same height. When sitting on the bike, I'm able to just touch the ground with my tippy-toes which was the same as the Trek. If I decide to get another vintage mountain bike, what brand do you recommend/parts should I look for?
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Old 06-13-20, 09:21 PM
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You got a more comfortable ride with your Jamis Citizen, but at the expense of "fun". The Citizen geometry, suspension fork and seatpost are not doing you any favors.

A better bike would of been the Jamis Coda.

Originally Posted by morgothaod View Post
If I decide to get another vintage mountain bike, what brand do you recommend/parts should I look for?
Since you liked your Trek 800, look for a Trek 9xx series
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Old 06-13-20, 09:31 PM
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Part of the difference is between the suspension fork on the Jamis.

If you are riding on roads (smooth surfaces), a suspension fork isn't needed.

If you can, try locking it out (this might not be possible).

If the stem on the Jamis is adjustable, reduce the angle a bit.

If it doesn't have an adjustable stem, it might be worthwhile to get one.
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Old 06-14-20, 12:08 AM
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Just being able to touch the ground with your tippy-toes on each bike doesn't mean a thing (other than the seats are both the same height above the ground). That doesn't mean the seats are the same height above the pedals - maybe the old mountain bike had a lower bottom bracket.
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Old 06-14-20, 01:12 AM
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The guys from GCN say new mountain bikes are boring lol.
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Old 06-14-20, 04:37 AM
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I hope I adjusted the seat correctly. I just opened the quick release and raised the seat up. I didn't touch the suspension. The pouch that I had on the handlebars holds my phone, keys, and wallet. I attached some pictures of the handlebars. I'm not sure how to adjust them properly.







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Old 06-16-20, 10:35 AM
  #22  
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I found this bike in my area, your thoughts?
https://tampa.craigslist.org/pnl/bik...135858024.html
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Old 06-17-20, 07:16 PM
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Too small.
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Old 06-20-20, 11:24 AM
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I find aluminum bikes have a "dead' feel to them. Add that ez chair saddle and front suspension it gets even less exciting and disconnected.
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Old 06-20-20, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by morgothaod View Post
I found this bike in my area, your thoughts?
https://tampa.craigslist.org/pnl/bik...135858024.html
Do you know the size of your old Trek. Depending on your height, it might work. It is cheap enough to take a look. And if it is not too small you can make it fit.

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