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Who makes the lightest steel frame bikes?

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Who makes the lightest steel frame bikes?

Old 06-22-20, 03:49 PM
  #51  
Johnk3
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Cicli Barco XCr custom stainless steel 58.5 cm

Originally Posted by RH Clark View Post
How light can a steel frame bike get and who makes the lightest? What I would like is a 58cm steel frame road bike 700c wheels that is around 20 lbs and can accept tires from 23mm to about 42mm. Does one exist or can one be built from an older classic triple butted frame? I'm not experienced enough to know what to look for so thanks for any suggestions.
This is my new custom Cicli Barco frame made with Columbus XCr which is a very thin, very light, and very expensive, stainless steel, triple butted tubing. This bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals. It has a 58.5 cm seat tube. The fork is also stainless but has a carbon fiber steering tube to save weight. The price of this frame with all the custom features, like the Barco Viva fork, internal brake cable, direct mount brakes, metal name plate, Italian shield, multi-color paint, dark nickel head badge etc. was $3,600, including shipping from Italy. It is handmade exactly the way you want with any finish or paint you can imagine. Gianluca Barco is very fluent in English and works very closely with you to make sure you get exactly what you want. We had about 140 emails between us during the design and build process. I can not recommend them highly enough. I suggest that you look at their Facebook page to see how highly they are regarded in Italy. And, to see some of the options available. You will also see my frame in there.

Although, the bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals, it would be possible to cut some more weight off with a lighter saddle, carbon fork, and carbon wheels (although not wide ones). My wheels are HED Belgium Plus alloy rims which are much wider than most and are tubeless ready. I have 25 cm width Vittoria Corsa Control tubeless tires which end up being 29 cm on these wide rims. The Campagnolo Direct Mount Brakes open to 31.5 cm, wider than most rim brakes. They also work a lot better and are much stronger and trouble free than classic rim brakes.

If you want to know what the bike is really like, here is a review of the same bike. The only difference is the wheels, saddle, and the Campy SR electronic shifting, mine has the mechanical Campy SR group. All the other stuff is WR Compositi carbon fiber from the folks who also make carbon fiber parts for Ferrari and Lamborghini. That bike won the "Best of Italy" award at Bespoked, the English handmade bicycle show last year. That bike weighed 17.6 lbs. but it is a much smaller frame size than mine.
https://www.cyclist.co.uk/reviews/66...rco-xcr-review They give it a 5 star rating and a rave review.



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Campy direct mount brakes and the steel/carbon fork
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Old 06-22-20, 03:53 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by Dirt Farmer View Post
Yes, that's nice! My Jamis Quest Elite - which comes with carbon forks - weighs in at 19.75, but that is with new Psimet wheels, Zipp carbon bars, and a Bontrager carbon seat post.
Very nice Supercorsa, but it is a very small sized frame so the weight is misleading. I have a new Supercorsa that weighs in at just under 21 lbs with pedals for a 58.5 cm frame. But I have a relatively heavy Brooks saddle. Also It would not accept wide tires.
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Old 06-22-20, 04:03 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Johnk3 View Post
This is my new custom Cicli Barco frame made with Columbus XCr which is a very thin, very light, and very expensive, stainless steel, triple butted tubing. This bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals. It has a 58.5 cm seat tube. The fork is also stainless but has a carbon fiber steering tube to save weight. The price of this frame with all the custom features, like the Barco Viva fork, internal brake cable, direct mount brakes, metal name plate, Italian shield, multi-color paint, dark nickel head badge etc. was $3,600, including shipping from Italy. It is handmade exactly the way you want with any finish or paint you can imagine. Gianluca Barco is very fluent in English and works very closely with you to make sure you get exactly what you want. We had about 140 emails between us during the design and build process. I can not recommend them highly enough. I suggest that you look at their Facebook page to see how highly they are regarded in Italy. And, to see some of the options available. You will also see my frame in there.

Although, the bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals, it would be possible to cut some more weight off with a lighter saddle, carbon fork, and carbon wheels (although not wide ones). My wheels are HED Belgium Plus alloy rims which are much wider than most and are tubeless ready. I have 25 cm width Vittoria Corsa Control tubeless tires which end up being 29 cm on these wide rims. The Campagnolo Direct Mount Brakes open to 31.5 cm, wider than most rim brakes. They also work a lot better and are much stronger and trouble free than classic rim brakes.

If you want to know what the bike is really like, here is a review of the same bike. The only difference is the wheels, saddle, and the Campy SR electronic shifting, mine has the mechanical Campy SR group. All the other stuff is WR Compositi carbon fiber from the folks who also make carbon fiber parts for Ferrari and Lamborghini. That bike won the "Best of Italy" award at Bespoked, the English handmade bicycle show last year. That bike weighed 17.6 lbs. but it is a much smaller frame size than mine.
https://www.cyclist.co.uk/reviews/66...rco-xcr-review They give it a 5 star rating and a rave review.



Custom name plate

Campy direct mount brakes and the steel/carbon fork
Huh, I would have expected less.

Mine steel bike is 18.18 with pedals and cages. Older Campy 10s Chorus with the exception of the 11s carbon crank (wanted a compact). Are you running tanks for wheels or something? I guess it looks a fair amount larger than mine.

Sweet bike nonetheless.


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Old 06-22-20, 05:10 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
Huh, I would have expected less.

Mine steel bike is 18.18 with pedals and cages. Older Campy 10s Chorus with the exception of the 11s carbon crank (wanted a compact). Are you running tanks for wheels or something? I guess it looks a fair amount larger than mine.

Sweet bike nonetheless.


Your bike is a lot smaller than mine is. The Barco XCr in the review is a little larger than yours and weighs 17.6. A few inches of steel tubing here and there add up. Measure your seat tube from the center of the chainring axle to the center of the center of where the top tube is welded on to the the seat tube. My guess is that it would be about 53 cm. Mine is 58.5 cm. Remember that the larger bike has a longer seat tube, longer top tube, longer head tube and longer down tube.
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Old 06-22-20, 06:48 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by RH Clark View Post
I wouldn't necessarily mind a carbon fork, bars and seat post for that matter. Having a custom made may be the answer but if there was a less expensive option involving a vintage frame, that would be ideal. 38mm tires would do fine as well, if that's the limit. The Kona Roadhouse is as close as I found and I think it's out of production.
Good luck . The vintage italian steel frames have little clearance. At least at the fork. Maybe swap out the fork? My Concorde has 23s, and it might fit 25s but not much more than that. The bike with 105 is about 23 lbs.
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Old 06-22-20, 06:55 PM
  #56  
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I have no idea who makes the lightest steel frame, but I do know that INdependent Fabrication makes some very light steel frames. Some places have a few of their frames on hand, but mostlhy they are custom built, and they can, according to a variety of factors, use different weights of tubing.
I've had one of their's for 13 years now, and I'm terribly fond of it.
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Old 06-22-20, 07:37 PM
  #57  
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Agreed. The IF stuff is really, really nice. Steel is such a nice ride. So many advantages.
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Old 06-22-20, 07:40 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Johnk3 View Post
This is my new custom Cicli Barco frame made with Columbus XCr which is a very thin, very light, and very expensive, stainless steel, triple butted tubing. This bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals. It has a 58.5 cm seat tube. The fork is also stainless but has a carbon fiber steering tube to save weight. The price of this frame with all the custom features, like the Barco Viva fork, internal brake cable, direct mount brakes, metal name plate, Italian shield, multi-color paint, dark nickel head badge etc. was $3,600, including shipping from Italy. It is handmade exactly the way you want with any finish or paint you can imagine. Gianluca Barco is very fluent in English and works very closely with you to make sure you get exactly what you want. We had about 140 emails between us during the design and build process. I can not recommend them highly enough. I suggest that you look at their Facebook page to see how highly they are regarded in Italy. And, to see some of the options available. You will also see my frame in there.

Although, the bike weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals, it would be possible to cut some more weight off with a lighter saddle, carbon fork, and carbon wheels (although not wide ones). My wheels are HED Belgium Plus alloy rims which are much wider than most and are tubeless ready. I have 25 cm width Vittoria Corsa Control tubeless tires which end up being 29 cm on these wide rims. The Campagnolo Direct Mount Brakes open to 31.5 cm, wider than most rim brakes. They also work a lot better and are much stronger and trouble free than classic rim brakes.

If you want to know what the bike is really like, here is a review of the same bike. The only difference is the wheels, saddle, and the Campy SR electronic shifting, mine has the mechanical Campy SR group. All the other stuff is WR Compositi carbon fiber from the folks who also make carbon fiber parts for Ferrari and Lamborghini. That bike won the "Best of Italy" award at Bespoked, the English handmade bicycle show last year. That bike weighed 17.6 lbs. but it is a much smaller frame size than mine.
https://www.cyclist.co.uk/reviews/66...rco-xcr-review They give it a 5 star rating and a rave review.



Custom name plate

Campy direct mount brakes and the steel/carbon fork
Bling Bling. What a gorgeous bike.
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Old 06-22-20, 10:08 PM
  #59  
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have you considered Titanium? It should be lighter than steel or chromolly.
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Old 06-22-20, 11:49 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by AnthonyG View Post
A 20 lb. bike with a steel frame is doable. accepting tires from 23mm to 42mm is going to be the fly in the ointment.
Agree. The weight isn't super difficult even with a steel fork. Not easy, just not ridiculous. You kind have to be a little, but not world-class, weigh weenie-ish for all the parts including light tires and tubes. An ounce or two here and there adds up over an entire build if you're looking for a goal weight. Even look at skewers, rim tape and bar tape - again, see if you can save a bit for what you'd spend anyway.

The large tire size, not so much. Large tires and tubes and the wheels to accommodate them would add a very significant amount of weight to the build, compared to reasonably light alloy wheels and lightweight 23-25mm tires and lightweight tubes. If you're going modern-retro with downtube indexed shifters, that helps quite a bit compared to integrated brake shifters.

As far as the frame and fork, my limited experience is that a lot of vintage nice high end or near-high end framesets (i.e. double butted 531 or SL grade steel) will allow you to get in that 20 pound range without being too awfully crazy about it. Just a little bit crazy, looking to save an ounce or two every time you pick a component. This stuff is fun and you can do it with some recreational time on eBay or finding websites that sell out stock.
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Old 06-23-20, 07:55 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by ridinginjeans View Post
Bling Bling. What a gorgeous bike.
The Campagnolo Super Record 12 speed group is mechanical, smooth as silk and you never have to worry about charging your battery. The 11-32 cassette helps these old legs on the hills. I don't ride my gravel bike as much anymore because this does everything it does, but better.
Dark nickel head badge

Direct mount brakes

Some Italian carbon

In action

A flat part of Creek Road in Dripping Springs, TX, one of my usual rides.

Last edited by Johnk3; 06-23-20 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 06-23-20, 06:04 PM
  #62  
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I'm sold! These are the most beautiful bikes I have ever seen!

Someone asked about Titanium. Rationally or not, I guess I'm afraid of it. I'm about to pass up an opportunity to buy a nice Titanium bike fairly cheap for it's original cost but it might take 28mm tires at max and I have some rough roads here in the dirty south.
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Old 06-23-20, 10:47 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by RH Clark View Post
I'm sold! These are the most beautiful bikes I have ever seen!

Someone asked about Titanium. Rationally or not, I guess I'm afraid of it. I'm about to pass up an opportunity to buy a nice Titanium bike fairly cheap for it's original cost but it might take 28mm tires at max and I have some rough roads here in the dirty south.
https://forums.thepaceline.net/showt...highlight=lyon pics on Flickr. Those Jeff Lyon framesets tend to be fairly lightweight for what they are. Good clearance on them. This one is rim brake.

This Rossman is disc brake. Have a look at those tubes and the complete build (wheels!). https://theradavist.com/2019/08/how-...s-brest-paris/
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Old 06-25-20, 07:09 PM
  #64  
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Geez, my all original 1984 Fuji Club weighs 21 pounds.

The Rodriguez Outlaw RL weighs 13.5 pounds, and I haven't heard one bad report about those frames for all the years they made those bikes, and still make them today. https://www.rodbikes.com/catalog/out...tlaw-main.html
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Old 06-26-20, 08:13 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
Geez, my all original 1984 Fuji Club weighs 21 pounds.

The Rodriguez Outlaw RL weighs 13.5 pounds, and I haven't heard one bad report about those frames for all the years they made those bikes, and still make them today. https://www.rodbikes.com/catalog/out...tlaw-main.html
Keep in mind that there is a significant weight difference depending on size. Just saying that your specific bike weighs a certain amount is meaningless without a size.
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Old 06-26-20, 08:43 AM
  #66  
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While I wouldn't want a heavy ride made out of plumbing pipes, I have seen more than one big, heavy, strong guy mangle super light wheels and break rear dropouts. Might be less expensive, more predictable and faster to take a few pounds off the rider instead. 3 pounds off your bike might cost $5000, giving up a little pizza actually saves you money.
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Old 06-26-20, 09:10 AM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by bblair View Post
While I wouldn't want a heavy ride made out of plumbing pipes, I have seen more than one big, heavy, strong guy mangle super light wheels and break rear dropouts. Might be less expensive, more predictable and faster to take a few pounds off the rider instead. 3 pounds off your bike might cost $5000, giving up a little pizza actually saves you money.
You are so right. Until You lose that extra 20 lbs., spending a lot of money on fragile, light weight stuff is not only a waste of money but could be dangerous. Many light weight items come with a weight limit. It's there for a reason. The same reasoning applies to aero shaped carbon bike frames; unless you have the physique of a pro racer, the aero effect of your bike frame and wheels is completely insignificant compared with your own bulk. There lies one of the great reasons to have a good steel bike that will last forever rather than this year's fad mass produced carbon stuff.
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Old 06-26-20, 09:14 AM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Johnk3 View Post
Keep in mind that there is a significant weight difference depending on size. Just saying that your specific bike weighs a certain amount is meaningless without a size.
The one I rode was a size 56.
As many times as The Outlaw has been mentioned in this thread, & it's disc brake twin, The Bandito, I get the impression no one really believes a steel bike can be 13.5 pounds.

It's true.
It can.
There is one against the wall of their shop & you can touch it & feel & ride it to see for yourself.
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Old 06-26-20, 10:33 AM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
Geez, my all original 1984 Fuji Club weighs 21 pounds.

The Rodriguez Outlaw RL weighs 13.5 pounds, and I haven't heard one bad report about those frames for all the years they made those bikes, and still make them today. https://www.rodbikes.com/catalog/out...tlaw-main.html
That is one very expensive bike. Their custom version (+ $200) with Campy Super Record group costs $12,700 and weighs 14 lbs for about a 53 size. My custom stainless steel Cicli Barco XCr has a stainless steel fork with carbon steering tube, the full Campy Super Record group, and custom, handmade carbon parts by WR Compositi, Selle SMP Pro saddle with carbon rails, and HED Belgium Plus rims on White Inds. T11 hubs and Sapim CX-Ray spokes with Vitoria Corsa Control tubeless tires. It weighs 18.875 lbs. with pedals and bottle cage for a 58.5 size and cost me $5,000 less. I wonder how much a 58.5 cm Rodriquez Outlaw RL would weigh?

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Old 06-26-20, 11:00 AM
  #70  
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Yeah, but if you "downgrade" to Dura-Ace you can save almost 5 grand too. Some buyers just want to spend money because money = greatness. Add in Campagnolo to the exclusivity club & you've got a recipe for big $$$ sales.

They sell A LOT. The Outlaw (of any trim level) is their most popular bike & the limit is really how fast they can make 'em.

$8500 really is in the same range as any reasonably high end carbon bike & priced consistant with the high end bike market. How many here paid ~5-6k for a bike & put $3k worth of wheels on it?

You can buy just the frameset & build it up any way you like too. That's super cool if you have particular tastes or an above average parts bin as well. That's what I'd do if ever my R5 needs replacement. It'd be easy to just swap the parts over.
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Old 06-26-20, 12:43 PM
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An individual frame builder will select the lightest materials to satisfy you. if you are on the heavy side yourself ,
may recommend where you might be better served to not use the thinnest wall lightest tubes. lest it feel noodly beneath you ..

hand made.
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Old 06-26-20, 03:03 PM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
An individual frame builder will select the lightest materials to satisfy you. if you are on the heavy side yourself ,
may recommend where you might be better served to not use the thinnest wall lightest tubes. lest it feel noodly beneath you ..

hand made.
A couple people have mentioned body weight. I am 6'1.5inches tall and 170 lbs. I'm 52 years old and I weighed 360lbs when I was 50 years old. I got here by nothing but a good diet and lots of hard work. I've only been cycling 2 years and was over 300lbs when I bought my first MTB. I own about 10 bikes now with about 4 that are running. I doubt I have the skills to enjoy such super bikes as have been posted ,but at my age I have to ask, if not now , when? I haven't done a century yet but I do a 20-30 mile road ride 3-4 times a week usually. I love steel bikes and own a very nice Surly LHT, A Trek 400,and a 1983 Miyata 610 as my best bikes right now.
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Old 06-26-20, 05:26 PM
  #73  
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If I could buy my way into the "A Group," I would do it tomorrow.
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Old 06-26-20, 06:15 PM
  #74  
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The Cicli Barco website was pure cycling pornography. I must have one.
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Old 06-27-20, 11:16 PM
  #75  
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i know gitane has some light boy standard models but if you want something too light (CF or something similar) I think you have to go to one of those custom shops
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