Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

MTB, Road, or Hybrid?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

MTB, Road, or Hybrid?

Old 07-16-20, 02:34 PM
  #1  
taylorgeo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
MTB, Road, or Hybrid?

It's been 15 years since I rode a bike. I'm 5'8", 350 lbs., down from 400 lbs.

I'll be riding predominantly on smooth pavement, with some bumps here and there, and occasionally on flat dirt trails.

My concerns are...

1. Frame failing at the head tube
2. Front wheel coming off open fork dropouts
3. Cracking the seatpost

And anything that would cause me to hit the pavement that I'm not aware of!

Just wondering if it's safer to lose another 50 pounds and wait till next summer to ride (I live in the Northeast).

My budget is $600.

Thanks!
taylorgeo is offline  
Old 07-16-20, 02:42 PM
  #2  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 4,494

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1660 Post(s)
Liked 379 Times in 262 Posts
If you are motivated now, then ride now. Problem is EVERYBODY and his uncle has been purchasing bicycles this year. The shops are literally sold out and $600 is smack dab in the middle of the range for everything being sold, so good luck. Look on Craigslist but expect to pay top dollar.

That said, a hybrid for now, from a local shop that can fit you, also have them make sure the wheels are decent as that's where you will have the most issues due to weight. Frames rarely fail, neither do seat posts. Sometimes the support rails of the seat as well as the original cheap pedals. The front wheel coming off is really only an issue of not correctly installing the quick release, as wheels usually do not come off.
Steve B. is offline  
Likes For Steve B.:
Old 07-16-20, 03:18 PM
  #3  
Ogsarg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Hollister, CA (not the surf town)
Posts: 1,110

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Roubaix Comp Di2, 2009 Roubaix, early 90's Giant Iguana

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 420 Post(s)
Liked 509 Times in 218 Posts
New bikes will have weight ratings so make sure anything you look at is rated to handle your weight. A bike shop might be able to help you with suggestions. As was noted, entry level bikes are mostly sold out everywhere so you may have a hard time finding something.

If you live in a populated area, one idea might be to look on craigslist for a used bike. Rigid frame mountain bikes from the 90's were built really well if you get a known brand. Something with 3 X 7 or 3 X 8 gearing will give you a good range. Parts are mostly still available and inexpensive.
Ogsarg is online now  
Old 07-16-20, 04:03 PM
  #4  
taylorgeo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
All of the Mountain Bikes in my price range ($600) have a max weight capacity of 300 lbs. Which made me think that if a 300 lb. rider were to do jumps on such a bike, why wouldn't if hold a 350 lb. rider just coasting on pavement.

The 2021 Kona Lana'i looks the sturdiest in my price range. Don't know much about Kona, but my LBS said they'd have it in next month. Price is $599.
taylorgeo is offline  
Old 07-16-20, 04:03 PM
  #5  
Troul
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 2,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 201 Times in 148 Posts
hybrid; aluminum frame & fork. 32+ spokes, & a lot of motivation. That'll get ya burning the candle good & hot. Next summer you'll be looking at a road bicycle.
Troul is offline  
Likes For Troul:
Old 07-16-20, 04:14 PM
  #6  
SteveKB
Member
 
SteveKB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Steveston, BC
Posts: 35

Bikes: Giant Escape 3, Giant OCR 3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Hybrids are well suited for a get-back-into-Cycling bike, especially if you are mostly on pavement and fairly smooth surfaces.
Maybe an older Cromoly framed non-suspension MTN bike? They are a solid, dependable ride. That's what I rode for years,
SteveKB is offline  
Old 07-16-20, 04:19 PM
  #7  
Speedway2
Senior Member
 
Speedway2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Thornhill, Canada
Posts: 358

Bikes: Specialized Langster, Giant OCR, Marin Muirwoods, Felt Speedway2. Norco Indie3. VROD:)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 133 Times in 97 Posts
taylorgeo.....have you looked at the Workman line of bikes? Some of the models are over your budget but you know the saying...."Buy Once Cry Once"
https://www.worksmancycles.com/inb.html

Last edited by Speedway2; 07-16-20 at 04:24 PM. Reason: added link
Speedway2 is offline  
Likes For Speedway2:
Old 07-16-20, 04:19 PM
  #8  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 4,308

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut (retired), Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo, Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, Waterford, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, Serotta, and looking for a Brompton M6R

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 236 Post(s)
Liked 1,051 Times in 317 Posts
Originally Posted by taylorgeo View Post
All of the Mountain Bikes in my price range ($600) have a max weight capacity of 300 lbs. Which made me think that if a 300 lb. rider were to do jumps on such a bike, why wouldn't if hold a 350 lb. rider just coasting on pavement.

The 2021 Kona Lana'i looks the sturdiest in my price range. Don't know much about Kona, but my LBS said they'd have it in next month. Price is $599.
I don't own a Kona but they are nice bikes. that one should be good for you to start with. When you catch the bug, you can decide what type of riding best suits you.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Old 07-16-20, 04:25 PM
  #9  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 6,327

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1869 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 303 Posts
A mountain bike with heavy duty 36 spoke wheels.
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 07-16-20, 08:51 PM
  #10  
biker128pedal
Senior Member
 
biker128pedal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern VA
Posts: 948

Bikes: Madone 5.0, Black Beta (Nashbar frame)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 37 Posts
Out of your price range but Salsa bike are rated to 350 pounds.
biker128pedal is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 05:45 AM
  #11  
taylorgeo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Some great suggestions here, really appreciate it.

My other issue is my short inseam (approx. 28 to 29 inches). When I straddle the top tube on my friend's Diamondback Outlook (Size Small, 16-inch seat tube), my belly presses against the stem, while my rump hits the front of the saddle. No horizontal clearance.

I'm an anatomical mess!

Here is the geometry for the two bikes that my LBS is getting in soon, Size Medium:

Kona Lana'i
(standover 28.3, effective top tube 23.6, reach 17.3, seat tube length 16.5)

Giant Talon 3
(standover 29.5, effective top tube 23.4, reach 16.5, seat tube length 16.9)
taylorgeo is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 07:09 AM
  #12  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 4,494

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1660 Post(s)
Liked 379 Times in 262 Posts
Originally Posted by taylorgeo View Post
Some great suggestions here, really appreciate it.

My other issue is my short inseam (approx. 28 to 29 inches). When I straddle the top tube on my friend's Diamondback Outlook (Size Small, 16-inch seat tube), my belly presses against the stem, while my rump hits the front of the saddle. No horizontal clearance.

I'm an anatomical mess!
Don't sweat stand over height too much, my Specialized Chisel has me on tight to the downtube, bike fits perfectly. You can always just lean the bike a bit when putting a foot down.

Good that you're at a shop getting sized, they'll be useful for when the rear wheel goes out of true, which is inevitable with heavy riders. I would be stressing to the shop (if they haven't already mentioned it) that a strong rear wheel is really, really important. That's where a lot of the weight is and what takes the pounding, as well what usually has issues with spokes breaking. Be prepared to be posting here after a season looking for advice for a strong rear wheel replacement.
Steve B. is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 09:37 AM
  #13  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,284 Times in 801 Posts
Since you cannot make up your mind, the Hybrid. by definition, is the middle ground..

You can always change the handlebars & Compass/Rene Herse sells fast wider tires. or fit 'gravel' tires for dirt roads..
fietsbob is offline  
Likes For fietsbob:
Old 07-17-20, 10:22 AM
  #14  
jgwilliams
Senior Member
 
jgwilliams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Surrey, UK
Posts: 542

Bikes: Planet X Carbon Pro Evo SRAM Force, custom built 653 and 531 bikes with frames by Barry Witcomb, Giant XTC 4 mountain bike and a Brompton folding bike.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 168 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 28 Posts
One thing that people rarely mention when choosing between mountain/hybrid/road bikes is the hand position. Having ridden road bikes all my life I find road bars way more comfortable than straight bars. I love mountain biking but I find that after an hour or so I have a tingling sensation in my arms and I need to stop and get the circulation going again. I suggest you try and work out which works better for you. If you like road bars a gravel bike might be the way to go.
jgwilliams is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 10:51 AM
  #15  
zeeway
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Low Country, SC, USA
Posts: 96

Bikes: Trek Madone 2.5, single speed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 23 Times in 11 Posts
Congrats on deciding to take that first step - the key to every success. As a heavier rider, you should stay away from road bikes - although I agree that the hand position afforded by the road bike handlebars is ideal. I would suggest a mountain bike or a gravel bike with big tires (32’s or wider). Try before you buy, if possible...at least a ride in the bike shop parking lot.

But the most important thing is start now and be consistent. Start by riding around the block, and add a block a week. Ride every day, if possible. Take water. Even in the the summer, it is cooler on a bike (you make your own breeze).

Good luck on your quest.
zeeway is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 11:54 AM
  #16  
Wildwood
Veteran/Pacifist/Resister
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 10,006

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 222 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2354 Post(s)
Liked 858 Times in 530 Posts
If I were really worried about failure of frame or wheels - my ultimate solution. Vintage mtn bike with 40spoke tandem wheels.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 02:19 PM
  #17  
taylorgeo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
As an alternative to the Kona Lana'i and Giant Talon 3, what do you all think of the Giant Sedona DX?

Also, I've read that disc brakes can potentially cause the front wheel to come out of open fork dropouts... Would rim breaks be safer? Or thru-axles?

My apologies for all the questions, I'm still educating myself, and want to make sure I buy the safest bike possible. I do not want to end up at HSS!
taylorgeo is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 02:32 PM
  #18  
Aladin
Senior Member
 
Aladin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Siberia West .. aka Central Wisconsin... USA
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2000 Litespeed Appalachian, 1998 Litespeed BlueRidge.. 1977? Schwinn LeTour 12.2 'Rain Daze'

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
If I were really worried about failure of frame or wheels - my ultimate solution. Vintage mtn bike with 40spoke tandem wheels.

Where is the OP going to get a 40 h'er?? LMFAO. Easier to find hen's teeth...........

Steel mtb.. sure. 36 rear is enough w 135 spacing.. gets him enough NDS tension for durability.

Best route at this weight AND apparent concerns per weight vs bike safety.. is an average 3 wheeler one sees around our winter home. Stability... 'huff and puff' time.. till the shadow gets smaller.

4 down to 3.5 is GREAT. Keep it up...
Aladin is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 04:05 PM
  #19  
blue192
Senior Member
 
blue192's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 437

Bikes: Norco Scene 1, Khs Westwood, Jamis Allegro 3x

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 33 Times in 22 Posts
I get the feeling it would be better to just buy a nice pair of walking shoes until next year. Every shoppe in my area at least is having trouble keeping bikes in stock due to demand vs little manufacturing going on in Asia due to the beer virus.
blue192 is online now  
Old 07-17-20, 04:48 PM
  #20  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,284 Times in 801 Posts
A Touring bike frame is strong , & can be set up in many configurations.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 05:01 PM
  #21  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,011

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1077 Post(s)
Liked 689 Times in 339 Posts
taylorgeo Whatever you choose, get smooth road tires, the wider, the better. They will roll easier than knobbies or heavily treaded tires.

Also, there is no shame in getting a mixte (lower crossbar) or step-through bike. I'm a 58-year-old commuter whose been biking his whole life, almost daily for the last 28 years, and my next bike will almost certainly be a mixte or step-through. It's getting harder and harder to through my leg over the seat, or step over the bar.

As far as motivation...before 2010 I'd have periods of inactivity, mostly in the winter, and it was tough to get back on the bike. In 2010 I slipped a disk in my neck and was off the bike for a year. My recovery wasn't as challenging as some one who has to re-learn to walk, but hills and distances I never gave a second thought to were now impossible. But I just kept chanting the mantra I learned here on Bikeforums, "Ride YOUR ride." Now I ride year-round, wind, rain, snow. I'm not the fastest or the fanciest, or even the most dedicated (although I'm pretty tough in that department).

There is fun and satisfaction to be had with any bike ridden, and any accomplishment, no matter how small.

Each of us has our own set of circumstances, physically, financially, time-wise, geographically. ANY ride is better than NO ride.

Especially now, with the pandemic with its extra challenges and dearth of new bicycles and elevated prices, ANY adequate bike and ANY adequate cycling effort you put forth is admirable and commendable. If you can start biking under these conditions and sustain a regular riding schedule no matter how modest, you will be in a better position for your next bike purchase, and in a better condition to enjoy it even more.

There is no shame in minor setbacks or temporarilly "reverse progress", progress will come if you stick with it.

So buy that bike, don't second guess it, and...

go, Go, GO!
BobbyG is offline  
Old 07-17-20, 11:08 PM
  #22  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 2,258

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 500 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 172 Posts
Originally Posted by taylorgeo View Post
As an alternative to the Kona Lana'i and Giant Talon 3, what do you all think of the Giant Sedona DX?

Also, I've read that disc brakes can potentially cause the front wheel to come out of open fork dropouts... Would rim breaks be safer? Or thru-axles?

My apologies for all the questions, I'm still educating myself, and want to make sure I buy the safest bike possible. I do not want to end up at HSS!
For the type of riding you are doing, QR discs are fine. Bikes made after 2000 all have lawyer lips, which are not as good as thru axle, but will help to keep the QR in place. It might also be tough to find a thru axle setup in your price range.

The biggest plus with disc brakes is braking regardless of wheel trueness. You don’t want to ride severely out of true wheels or ones with a broken spoke, but at heavier weights it can be more of a problem. Trueness doesn’t effect disc brakes, not that you will keep riding a wheel with issues, but you can probably get home and You won’t have to open out the brake calipers, reduce braking, to get there.

John

Last edited by 70sSanO; 07-17-20 at 11:14 PM.
70sSanO is offline  
Old 07-18-20, 09:36 AM
  #23  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,284 Times in 801 Posts
And the front wheel QR lever goes on the side opposite the disc, disc, left, skewer nut on that side, lever on the right side ..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 07-18-20, 01:34 PM
  #24  
taylorgeo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
I was contemplating a step-through bike, but aren't they less durable then a standard triangle frame? I do like the ease of getting on and off, especially if it's an emergency stop.

Though they are women's bikes, the Liv Bliss and Cannondale Tango have "sloped" top tubes. Maybe a good compromise.
taylorgeo is offline  
Old 07-20-20, 12:57 PM
  #25  
tntmoriv
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Helena, Montana
Posts: 10

Bikes: 2014 Soma Saga, 1990 Klein Piinnacle, 1971 Schwinn Speedster, 2008 Kona Jake

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Touring bike

Maybe look at a used loaded touring Bike, since wheels and frame are designed for heavy loads. I am heavier, too, and the stiffer stronger frame and wheels, and stronger brakes, make my touring bike my regular “road bike” but I can run wider tires and lower gears. If not that, then a 1980’s Mountain bike as previously suggested may be good, too. Good luck and keep on riding!!!
tntmoriv is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.