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Cassette, Freehub, Freewheel

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Cassette, Freehub, Freewheel

Old 08-07-20, 06:49 AM
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taylorgeo
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Cassette, Freehub, Freewheel

What the hell is the difference? And what the hell is sturdiest?
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Old 08-07-20, 06:56 AM
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Here you go...

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
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Old 08-07-20, 06:58 AM
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Perhaps this can help:

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

tl;dr version: freewheels are old technology, and not as strong or reliable as a freehub/cassette system when the number of sprockets on the rear cluster is greater than seven.
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Old 08-07-20, 09:13 AM
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Basically a freewheel is a carrier, body, with the gears, cogs attached, that simply screws onto the rear hub. The entire assembly, with ratcheting pawls, is installed and removed.

A freehub has the carrier, body, attached to the hub and a cassette, (gears/cogs) slides onto it. Only the cassette is replaced.

Since the question is being asked, I’m assuming you have, or are looking at a 7 speed, maybe 8, bike.

What is funny is that for all venerable 7 speed setups out there, 7 speed freehubs were so short lived, only 6 was less. They were only around for a few years. As far as I know, no one has made a 7 speed freehub for 25 years. Note: All new 7 speed bikes are freewheels that are not as strong and usually lower quality.

Ironically 8 speed freehubs have been around for decades. The 8 speed 130mm/135mm freehub accepts 9 and 10 speeds without modification so it just kept rolling along.

John
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Old 08-07-20, 09:22 AM
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A freehub with cassette is stronger than a freewheel.
Both should be stronger than your legs.
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Old 08-07-20, 09:36 AM
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A freewheel is often stronger than the tool needed to remove it.
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Old 08-07-20, 09:54 AM
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While mountain bikes didn’t usher in freehubs, they were the primary benefactor. A rider on smooth roads usually didn’t have any issues.

Put that same rider on terrain with rocks, roots, and drops and that axle doesn’t fare so well. Legs have nothing to do with it.

John
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Old 08-07-20, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
The brunt of the matter is that there is a longer wheel axle on a freewheel which increases the load on the axle and bearings. I don't remember ever having one fail but certainly I've never had a freehub fail from anything less than wicked overuse.
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Old 08-07-20, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
A freewheel is often stronger than the tool needed to remove it.
I removed singlespeed freewheels many times. It's important to use the proper tool that is compatible with the type of freewheel that you're removing and as long as everything is set up correctly it's shouldn't be a problem. The biggest mistake that people make is, they don't put enough grease or no grease at all on the threads when installing a new freewheel or they not using the removal tool correctly.
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Old 08-07-20, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by taylorgeo View Post
What the hell is the difference? And what the hell is sturdiest?
I know it's not for everybody but a fixed gear track cog is the sturdiest, most durable and longest lasting of all, there is nothing to break or go wrong with it. The second most durable thing is a singlespeed freewheel, it will outlast any freehub cassette or multi speed freewheel.
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Old 08-10-20, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
The second most durable thing is a singlespeed freewheel, it will outlast any freehub cassette or multi speed freewheel.
^ this is not a universally true statement. It ignores all things related to quality in both design/material selection and manufacturing. I can't even fathom why anyone would believe this.
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