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What to wear: In rain and in cold

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What to wear: In rain and in cold

Old 08-18-20, 06:06 AM
  #1  
wilson_smyth
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What to wear: In rain and in cold

Im used to getting properly kitted out from fishing in winter, being up to ones armpits for 8 hours in freezing water in December requires the right gear!
For cycling though im a bit lost. Id like some info on what you guys do.

My general thought process is to go as light as possible to prevent sweating, but not so light to be cold. This usually means merino baselayer top and bottoms, smartwool socks, fleece, weighted depending on weather, wool cap.
Prevent getting wet at all costs, which usually looks like rubber waders and a breathable jacket.

Im a bit lost as to how to do this when cycling. Ill be commuting so i want to be warm, but not dripping in sweat, as i wont have a different fleece or merino t-shirt for each day of the week!

Im thinking:
- Merino T-shirt (expensive but i find it works).
- cycling tights or merino long johns.
- light hiking pants
- light hiking boots ( i dont use cleats)
- light wool socks.
- breathable waterproof trousers ( i have berghaus)
- breathable waterproof shell jacket ( I have a columbia outdry)

I can add in a fleece and wolly hat if needed. I will also need gloves.

What are peoples thoughts and recommendations?
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Old 08-18-20, 06:50 AM
  #2  
aggiegrads
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Fist, a bit more detail is needed. First, where do you live? Winter in Chicago is different than winter in Seattle.

Second, how long is your commute? Do you use your commute as a workout, or just a leisurely ride to work?

In general, ventilation is much better than “breathability”. You can spend hundreds of dollars on goretex jackets and still get uncomfortably swampy when you start exercising hard.

I have different gear for every 10 degree difference. What I wear at 40 degrees F is different from what I wear at 30, and 20 degrees. Third, everyone’s body is different. I have been seen in a headband, full-fingered gloves, but shorts and a t-shirt at 55 degrees, because my hands and ears get cold quickly. On the other end of the spectrum, I can ride in “summer” shoes with wool socks down to about 35 degrees if it is dry outside.

What you have sounds reasonable, but the key will be to experiment. When I started I kept a diary of what I wore in specific conditions. I would record temperature, whether it was raining, what I wore, and if a particular body part was too cold or too hot. You will converge on your Goldilocks setup for certain temperature ranges pretty quick.
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Old 08-18-20, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
Fist, a bit more detail is needed. First, where do you live? Winter in Chicago is different than winter in Seattle.

Second, how long is your commute? Do you use your commute as a workout, or just a leisurely ride to work?

In general, ventilation is much better than “breathability”. You can spend hundreds of dollars on goretex jackets and still get uncomfortably swampy when you start exercising hard.

I have different gear for every 10 degree difference. What I wear at 40 degrees F is different from what I wear at 30, and 20 degrees. Third, everyone’s body is different. I have been seen in a headband, full-fingered gloves, but shorts and a t-shirt at 55 degrees, because my hands and ears get cold quickly. On the other end of the spectrum, I can ride in “summer” shoes with wool socks down to about 35 degrees if it is dry outside.

What you have sounds reasonable, but the key will be to experiment. When I started I kept a diary of what I wore in specific conditions. I would record temperature, whether it was raining, what I wore, and if a particular body part was too cold or too hot. You will converge on your Goldilocks setup for certain temperature ranges pretty quick.
Good point, more info is required:

1. I live in Ireland. can be cold, but not terribly so in recent years, 4-6 degrees c being about average, but wind and rain introducing a chill factor.
2. Commute is not long, but as i like to use it as a workout its often 60-90 mins each way and I dont treat it as a gentle cycle, something between leisure and the last 1k of a race!
3. I a slight build and run quite warm. If im cold, its a good sign im unwell or tired.

Will start keeping a diary. These days temperatures are 14-20 degrees, shorts and t-shirt with regular old trainers and a cheap cotton zip up with an old "breathable" shell over that if its raining. very comfortable but unfortunately we are getting to the time where a little more will be needed!
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Old 08-18-20, 07:25 AM
  #4  
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wilson_smyth Welcome to bikeforums! I have been commuting year round for 29 years, and recommitting to winter snow and ice for the last five. Your thinking seems to be correct about avoiding overheating and sweating. That was my problem before I discovered bikeforums 10 years ago where I learned:

Dress for how you will be feel ten to fifteen minutes into your ride (after you warm up).

I learned so much in the winter cycling forum here and the commuting forum here, and it changed my winter cycling for the better.

Ultimately, like everything else bike-related, one size does not fit all. We are all different, and you will have to adapt and fine tune all the advice and strategies to work best for you.

You can browse the topics in those forums I linked, or you can use the site's search function, or you can do a google search and add "site:bikeforums.net" to limit the results to this site.

Based on your post and your history of ice fishing, I am confident you will find what works for you and enjoy winter cycling.
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Old 08-18-20, 07:36 AM
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Originally Posted by wilson_smyth View Post
Good point, more info is required:

1. I live in Ireland. can be cold, but not terribly so in recent years, 4-6 degrees c being about average, but wind and rain introducing a chill factor.
2. Commute is not long, but as i like to use it as a workout its often 60-90 mins each way and I dont treat it as a gentle cycle, something between leisure and the last 1k of a race!
3. I a slight build and run quite warm. If im cold, its a good sign im unwell or tired.

Will start keeping a diary. These days temperatures are 14-20 degrees, shorts and t-shirt with regular old trainers and a cheap cotton zip up with an old "breathable" shell over that if its raining. very comfortable but unfortunately we are getting to the time where a little more will be needed!
I can’t wait to go back to Ireland. I plan to bring a bike as well as my handball gloves.

The weather there is not too unlike the weather in the Pacific Northwest in the US - rainy and just a few degrees above freezing for most of the fall, winter, and spring. I would browse the Winter forum and the commuting forum and pay particular attention to the posts from users from Seattle and Portland.

Also, full fenders are a must for commuting in wet weather. You don’t mention them, but I highly recommend them if you don’t already have them.
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Old 08-18-20, 07:52 AM
  #6  
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I’ve commuted for the past 7 winters in similar weather about 32km each way. I would give up on the notion of staying dry and be satisfied with keeping warm. I’ve tried numerous jackets with the latest ‘beathable’ fabrics and none of them would keep me dry if it’s raining and riding at a reasonable pace. I have at least a dozen wool, short and long sleeved baselayer tops and use normal bibs with leg warmers or tights on the bottom. I used to keep a spare set of bibs at work in case it was particularly wet but normally everything would dry out by the time I had to go home.

The jackets I used the most were castelli Idro(lightweight), Gabba and Alpha depending on temperature. It never gets much below -5C here and usually is above freezing. All of those jackets breathe and if it’s raining hard I’d get wet but usually stay warm. With the ride being about an hour it’s not the end of the world if I get the layers wrong on a given day.
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Old 08-18-20, 08:00 AM
  #7  
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Irish wool is the best.

A far as rain clothes don't know what to tell you. Anything that stops the water holds in the sweat. Best option I have found is just synthetics or wools to keep warm than plan on changing when I do stop. Shell jackets are good for warmth, especially if the wind is blowing cold, but riding in them is just counter productive. Learn to love the rain is my approach.

Need to keep the feet warm so your non-vented hiking boots are a good idea. I tried all sorts of socks, tape, toes covers, to keep my normal summer cycle shoes comfortable, but finally found peace with a decent set of winter cycling shoes.

Keeping a written or mental record of what works in what temps is important. Don't need to mention layers, gives you some range of adjustment as you get moving. One bit of advice if you are riding for a workout is if you are warm when you first set out you are overdressed. Should be a touch cold until you get moving.

For pants I have great luck with the dirt cheap cotton-synthetic blend sweat pants sold at discount stores. I'm talking $8 Fruit of the Loom here. Not very aerodynamic, but they work when wet, dry quickly and keep me warm down to about 0°C. I simply don't ride when it is colder than that. Knit hats, wool or synthetic again, are important. Sometimes I wear a buff over my face to keep the cold air from burning my face. Full finger work gloves are essential items as well, need to cover all exposed skin when it is really cold.
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Old 08-18-20, 08:29 AM
  #8  
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I regularly commuted in winter down to 5 F (-15 C), for 35 minutes, Anything below 40F and I was using Gore Windstopper Phantom 2.0 jacket and Pearl Izumi Elite AmFIB bib pants and gloves, and GoreTex winter shoes. And with thin synthetic layers beneath them all, including a silk layer under the gloves to pull the large amount of sweat away from the skin, and possibly chemical handwarmers on top of the hand, and on top of the toes.
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Old 08-18-20, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by wilson_smyth View Post
Im used to getting properly kitted out from fishing in winter, being up to ones armpits for 8 hours in freezing water in December requires the right gear!
For cycling though im a bit lost. Id like some info on what you guys do.

My general thought process is to go as light as possible to prevent sweating, but not so light to be cold. This usually means merino baselayer top and bottoms, smartwool socks, fleece, weighted depending on weather, wool cap.
Prevent getting wet at all costs, which usually looks like rubber waders and a breathable jacket.

Im a bit lost as to how to do this when cycling. Ill be commuting so i want to be warm, but not dripping in sweat, as i wont have a different fleece or merino t-shirt for each day of the week!

Im thinking:
- Merino T-shirt (expensive but i find it works).
- cycling tights or merino long johns.
- light hiking pants
- light hiking boots ( i dont use cleats)
- light wool socks.
- breathable waterproof trousers ( i have berghaus)
- breathable waterproof shell jacket ( I have a columbia outdry)

I can add in a fleece and wolly hat if needed. I will also need gloves.

What are peoples thoughts and recommendations?
I layer up, and usually have a set of panniers on the front to stow clothing. I don't have much in the way of bike specific clothes. I would like to find a set of rain leggings for wet weather.
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Old 08-18-20, 11:13 AM
  #10  
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cycling rain cape ( got a rather heavyduty one made by Grundens .. Of Sweden/Portugal (not shown)
Add rain pants/chaps only needed when it's blowing sideways ..


Last edited by fietsbob; 08-18-20 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 08-20-20, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by wilson_smyth View Post
My general thought process is to go as light as possible to prevent sweating, but not so light to be cold. This usually means merino baselayer top and bottoms, smartwool socks, fleece, weighted depending on weather, wool cap.
Prevent getting wet at all costs, which usually looks like rubber waders and a breathable jacket.
Based and experience both biking in the rain and winter cycling you're definitely on the right track.

Outer layer - waterproof breathable, like goretex or event fabric
Inner layer (next to skin) - merino wool
Middle layer (extra warmth) - merino wool or fleece

If you have the money to throw at it this will let you be totally comfortable in any cold/wet conditions.

If you need to go cheap, the key is to have a fully waterproof outer layer, then bike slower.
The slower you bike the less sweat you produce and the less breathability is required. You could probably use just a cheap walmart rainjacket if you never get above 5mph.

Originally Posted by wilson_smyth View Post
Im a bit lost as to how to do this when cycling. Ill be commuting so i want to be warm, but not dripping in sweat, as i wont have a different fleece or merino t-shirt for each day of the week!
One nice thing about merino wool is that it's structure is difficult for bateria to stick on so so you can wear it for a while before it starts to pick up a smell.

Temperature wise wool might be the best material for handling a wide range of temperatures, but eventually you need more or less insulation.
Best way to do this is usually to layer things. Have more than 1 thin wool baselayer, wear multiples of them when it's colder, only 1 when it's warmer.
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Old 08-20-20, 03:35 PM
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I commuted ~10 miles each way in Dublin for a couple of years. I was lucky in that I was a grad student - there was no expectation on me to look presentable . In my experience, you're going to get wet far more often than you're going to get cold. Keeping the rain off, and the subsequent wind chill is key, because it doesn't really get that cold. As someone already mentioned - to calibrate, wear enough that you're a little chilly starting out - if you're comfortable setting out, you're going to be overheating 15 minutes later. I also found that you're never going to stay fully dry - you can only hope to avoid getting completely hosed. Even a decent rain cape will let water in at the neck opening, but hopefully just enough to be annoying. But a cape will allow air to circulate under, which should reduce overheating. Fancy "breathable" waterproofs will have you sweating in no time.
I would say:
Fenders - essential
Cape - also highly visible!
Rain pants
Woolen hat
Some sort of fleece or woolen sweater - I had an old bainin (white Aran sweater for our US cousins) that I reserved for cycling - even if it got wet, it still did the job
waterproofish gloves - neoprene is good. I used fingered gloves - it's not cold enough to warrant mitts.
Some sort of overshoes, because your feet are going to get soaked. I just carried my actual shoes & socks in my backpack and let my trainers get soaked - which they did.

Last edited by Litespud; 08-20-20 at 03:39 PM.
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Old 08-21-20, 07:22 AM
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4-5C isn't that cold, in my book. Remember that you're going to be generating a lot of heat with spirited riding. Given those parameters, I'd skip a middle layer. As @aggiegrads noted, ventilation beats breathability. Breathability may work in cold dry weather, but high humidity or rain will block those submicroscopic pores and you'll have, effectively, a solid sheet of rubber holding body heat and sweat in.

So my recommendations, based on 15 winter and summer commuting years:

1. Find a jacket with lots of vents: zippered armpit vents, back vents, and a two-way front zipper.

2. Choose a jersey/shirt/base layer that starts out feeling chilly, and becomes comfortable 10-15 minutes into your ride.

3. Add long finger gloves, lightly insulated, and lightweight ear coverings (headband).

4. Cold and rain can be miserable. Get some polypro tights, one set plain and one with a light pile. You're going to have to experiment to learn what works for each set of conditions. 6C and less than a centimeter of rain per hour, the lighter tights will probably work fine. Your legs will generate enough heat while pedaling to keep warm, even in light rain. 2C, 2 cm/hour rain, 25 km/hr wind, good luck. If that's common, you may have to cut your ride short or get some waterproof leggings -- they'll leave you soaked in sweat, but not as cold.

5. Wool socks alone are OK (for me) if it's dry. If it's raining, you'll want shoe covers, toe covers, or my cheap special. Take a disposable plastic grocery bag (if you can get one). Cut the handles off, and cut the bag in two lengthwise. Wrap a half a bag around each sock foot before putting your shoes on. It'll keep your socks dry (except for rain that runs down from your ankles), blocks the wind, and keeps your feet warm.
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Old 08-21-20, 03:22 PM
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Gortex pants And Gortex jacket on top of my Nike dri fit outfit and redwings boot with wool socks for me.

my gortex and redwings costs more than my bike haha.

Last edited by barakah; 08-21-20 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 08-21-20, 04:09 PM
  #15  
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Dissent 133 gloves are worth it. You could make your own glove system for cheaper by combining different layers, but I don't mind paying full price since I usually don't get cold anywhere in the winters from commuting when it's above freezing except for my hands. I also have found real weatherproof boots to be far superior to shoe covers.

Wear a hardshell rather than softshell jacket when there's steady rain. After the softshell soaks through, it will make your core miserable even if you have a baselayer.
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Old 08-22-20, 12:52 PM
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In the rain and cold, I wear a sweater and my house slippers, and set in front of the TV or computer screen. When you get older you get smarter.
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Old 08-23-20, 12:52 PM
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The only garment which I wouldn't already be wearing off-bicycle, is a windproof vest. In the future I might switch that to something that's windproof only on the front but, the vest is what I wore last time.

I don't choose synthetics. I still wear some (such as that windproof vest that I mentioned) but am phasing them out. I choose garments made of wool or alpaca fiber. They of course are ventilating and not meant to be waterproof. For gloves I wear the kind of fingerless glove that converts into a mitten. They of course function on the layering principle.

I actually haven't had to deal with the kind of rain you're probably talking about. As my winters become wetter, less frozen, I'll probably be choosing some kind of rain cape. Waxed-cotton will be my preferred waterproof fabric for that.

Last edited by Nyah; 08-23-20 at 01:01 PM.
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Old 08-23-20, 08:09 PM
  #18  
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I like a lightweight but layered kit.

A good wicking base layer
An insulated layer above that
A good waterproof breathable rain shell and pant above that.

For gloves again I typically go layered if I can in a very similar fashion but in some cases depending on weather I might just have an all in one glove or a base glove and then one that has insulation and waterproofness but especially something with OutDry (no more DWR and then waterproof sandwich just waterproof).

For my feet I typically will run a Neoprene bootie over my shoes and of course will make sure I have the cleat holes covered (tape or sticker) but sometimes just a little thicker sock and waterproof bootie depending on conditions.


Though when it is cold and raining I probably won't do a ton of riding. However in just summer rain, I prefer to go out in normal kit and just get soaked assuming I am headed home on a commute. As much I don't like being wet I strangely enjoy it when I don't have anything but kit on all my stuff is tucked away and waterproof and I can come home strip down to my proper attire and dry off by the fireplace YouTube video.
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Old 08-23-20, 08:24 PM
  #19  
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Look in the Winter Cycling Forum. They have a FAQ how to dress for different temperatures.
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