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What will a new bike do for me?

Old 08-22-20, 10:34 AM
  #1  
Sorg67
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What will a new bike do for me?

I am shopping for a new bike. Currently leaning toward an endurance bike like Specialized Roubaix, Trek Domane and Cannondale Synapse.

I am riding a hybrid. It is comfortable on 40 mile rides. I am gradually increasing my distances.

Went on my first ride with a slow D group. No problem keeping up with those guys. Ride leader said he thought I would have no problem with the C group. But I would struggle in the B group.

I do not think a new bike would make the difference between being a C group rider and a B group rider. But I suspect it would help a bit.

Maybe a nicer, better fitting bike would be more comfortable.

And I think I would enjoy riding a higher quality bike, crisper shifting, smoother ride and I admit cooler. Maybe only cooler in my head, but that is really the only place it matters.

And I want a new toy.

Help me out here. I am working on rationalizing a splurge.....
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Old 08-22-20, 11:32 AM
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A new bike will always make you ride faster .... because your wallet will be lighter. ( < rimshot >)
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Old 08-22-20, 11:43 AM
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Oaky ... first there is no need to rationalize wanting more toys. And when it comes to bicycles, you need to rationalize NOT buying at least a couple more. So that whole part of your post .... done.

What can a new bike do, realistically?

When you start riding in a new style---say, more miles, more pace, or group rides---you can buy a bike well suited to your new style, and it will perform marginally better in the roles for which it was designed, no doubt.

A bike with a riding position more suited to extended efforts at higher output will be more comfortable over that distance at that effort. If the bike is lighter than your old one, it should seem snappier under acceleration and braking. If the steering is a little quicker the bike should feel more nimble.

Of course, the rider is ninety percent of the ride. The fastest guy in that group would likely be able to keep up with the group on your current bike, and honestly, even taking ten pounds off a bike, say, 32 to 22 pounds, is not a lot compared to the overall package of bike and rider. But even if the difference is slight, or even if it is mostly placebo, there is some difference and well ... that's part of what you are buying.

Will the new bike shift more crisply? Well, if you did a crappy set-up on the old bike and do the new bike better .... but there is no reason why an older hybrid shouldn't shift well.

As for a smoother ride .... if the tires are narrower and the frame more rigid on the new bike (not uncommon on a performance-oriented bike as opposed to a comfort bike) then the ride might be a little Less smooth, but you won't mind---it will be smooth enough.

As for as "cooler" ... that is entirely subjective. So ... if I had an old hybrid, I would find it cool as what it was, and my new endurance-geometry bike as cool for what it was. What other people think of my rides ... i don't ask because I don't care. So ... All my bikes are cool.

But, that said .... New is also good. And if you only have one bike .... well, don't bother thanking me for deigning to lower my standards and engage in conversation with a person who only owns one bike. Instead, go out there and remedy the situation!!

Ride on.
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Old 08-22-20, 11:53 AM
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I went from a 2014 Specialized Roubaix Expert (Ultegra groupset, passive suspension with CGR seatpost) to 2020 Trek Domane SLR9 (SRAM Red for nearly everything, aero XXX wheelset). I'm certainly not worthy of such a bike (middle aged guy with a 240W FTP) but I absolutely loved both bikes but the Domane takes it to a new level. I typically ride at least 25 miles per ride, often 50 and yesterday did 130 miles on the Domane. I felt fresher than I could have ever imagined after that ride.

If you like longer rides, I think you will find a lot of enjoyment in a new road bike. I don't know what your budget is but I would recommend that most people try to find a bike setup the way you'd like on the used market to save some big bucks. On the other hand, there isn't a lot of new or used bikes available right now.

The most important thing to do, in my opinion, is to get a pre-buy bike fit to ensure you get the right size frame. I was surprised to find a significant fitting difference between the Roubaix (58cm) and needing a 60 or even a 62cm Domane to fit properly. I got the 60cm Domane and used the preliminary fitting measurements to get things setup and will fine tune with the fitter soon.

I learned a lot from the fitting including how to improve my pedaling technique which I suspect will result in substantial improvement in my power. Additionally (note the 130 mile ride), the bike fits perfectly.
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Old 08-22-20, 12:02 PM
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One thing to note about the Domane is its ability to take on a 40 tire which is awesome for gravel. I bought Aeoulos XXX 4 TL for road riding with 28 TL Conti 5000s and have a set of the Pro 3V TL on order for gravel that I will equip with 40 tires. While the bike is speced for 38c, I tried a neighbors 40 and it fit with plenty of clearance in my opinion. Thankfully, only gravel farm roads as I don't want to ding this beauty up.

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Old 08-22-20, 12:09 PM
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Mainly food will taste better and the air will smell sweeter
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Old 08-22-20, 12:11 PM
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Ask not what a new bike can do for you—ask what you can do for a new bike.
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Old 08-22-20, 12:32 PM
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Nice!! Thanks for the help!!
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Old 08-22-20, 12:33 PM
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A new bike will inspire you to ride more, and longer, and try harder things, and maybe enjoy riding that much more. If it's more stable at speed than your hybrid, you might find yourself seeking out descents, and the only way to get to the descents is to ascend, so maybe you'll climb more.
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Old 08-22-20, 12:46 PM
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Got to ask this on pretty much all should I buy threads right now: is this theoretical, or have you actually located someone who has bikes in stock?
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Old 08-22-20, 01:23 PM
  #11  
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The bikes I want are in stock locally. The limiting factor is the ability to take test rides. You have to buy the bike ride it and return it if you do not like it. I would be willing to do that, but I am new to this style of bike so I really do not have a basis for comparison to know how I like the bike relative to other similar bikes. I would like to ride several back to back. Relative to my hybrid, all these bikes will be a lot different and I will like them all.

I think.....
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Old 08-22-20, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by hillyman View Post
Mainly food will taste better and the air will smell sweeter
You'll have more energy and self-confidence than you ever dreamed of!
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Old 08-22-20, 01:38 PM
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Here's a similar thread pondering the point of a new bike.Do I Want a Fast Bike?
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Old 08-22-20, 01:57 PM
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If you spend enough on the new bike ... the tension between yourself and your significant other will be enough to drive you out of the home and out onto the roads on your new bike.
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Old 08-22-20, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Here's a similar thread pondering the point of a new bike.Do I Want a Fast Bike?
What I mostly learned in that thread is that the performance benefits will be negligible. I think is more the aesthetics of a cool toy I will enjoy playing with, working on and caring for.

I think I will probably get one of the three endurance bikes mentioned in the OP. But I will wait until I can test ride them all and in both 54 and 56 cm frames.

In the meantime, I will put clipless pedals on my hybrid and get used to riding with those. I am considering some narrower tires. I might replace the suspension forks with fixed forks. Also considering replace the handlebars with carbon. It will be interesting to see how much I can improve my existing bike.

Not sure the handlebars and fork will be worth the money on a bike I probably will not ride a lot. But it might be a fun project while I wait for test rides to loosen up.
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Old 08-22-20, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Here's a similar thread pondering the point of a new bike.Do I Want a Fast Bike?
Glad the iggy list has no minimum.
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Old 08-22-20, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
If you spend enough on the new bike ... the tension between yourself and your significant other will be enough to drive you out of the home and out onto the roads on your new bike.
Seems someone needs a new significant other.

Last time I was shopping for a new bike, I was going custom. Had the shop price it with Di2 and also with the mechanical groupsat. Difference was $1200, which included porting the frame for the wires. Showed my wife the prices, and she immediately said “You told them to go ahead with the more expensive one, right?“

A couple months later, when the frame was almost finished, we got an unexpected $5000 check in the mail. I showed it to my wife, and she immediately said “anything left on that new bike that you need to upgrade?“

PS, she’s a lot younger and prettier than me, and she loves to cook. I must’ve been a really great person in some previous life.
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Old 08-22-20, 02:36 PM
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A new bike will give you a " temporary feel good sensation " for about the first 3 months. After that you will get bored with your new bike and come back here and start a " bored with my new bike " thread.
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Old 08-22-20, 03:37 PM
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Sorg67
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
A new bike will give you a " temporary feel good sensation " for about the first 3 months. After that you will get bored with your new bike and come back here and start a " bored with my new bike " thread.
Have you been spying on me my whole life?

[edit] Although I still ride my early 1990s Diamondback Apex.

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Old 08-22-20, 08:17 PM
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it will increase your enjoyment and motivation to ride, so, really you have no choice
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Old 08-22-20, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
I do not think a new bike would make the difference between being a C group rider and a B group rider. But I suspect it would help a bit.

Maybe a nicer, better fitting bike would be more comfortable.
The bikes of your choice will actually make a significant difference in terms of speed compared to your hybrid.

Comfort is another story with road-style bikes designed to use dropbars. One aspect of comfort is easier to pedal at the same speed you're going with a hybrid. But maybe less comfortable than hybrid if you're used to a more upright position.
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Old 08-23-20, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
The bikes of your choice will actually make a significant difference in terms of speed compared to your hybrid.
Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post

Comfort is another story with road-style bikes designed to use dropbars. One aspect of comfort is easier to pedal at the same speed you're going with a hybrid. But maybe less comfortable than hybrid if you're used to a more upright position.
Yes. Moving from a hybrid to a true road bike will indeed make a significant difference in speed.
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Old 08-23-20, 07:11 AM
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You are making a left brain/ right brain decision.

Pure left brain people see a bicycle as only a functional tool.
Pure right brain people see a bicycle as a toy.

Everybody draws the line between those two extremes differently. Have fun determining where your personal line is drawn.
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Old 08-23-20, 07:40 AM
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It doesn't even need to be a brand new bike. A "New to You" pre-owned can create excitement, too. Even just a mod. Over the last 23 years I have modified my 1997 Nishiki Blazer mountain-bike and each modification has produced varying levels of excitement in me, much to the annoyance of those on bikeforums, since I tend to over-share.

The four most exciting changes for me were studded snow tires, big fat slicks, and adding drop-bars and replacing the original cantilever brakes with V-brakes.

I would say these changes were on a par excitement-wise with acquiring a 16-year old road bike in 2009, and buying a brand new bike in 2015.

In my opinion, "rewarding" yourself by splurging on a new bike for having ridden is better than overspending on a new bike in hopes it will spark you to begin or increase riding, although whatever successfully gets you riding or keeps you riding is good in my book.

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Old 08-23-20, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Sorg67 View Post
I am shopping for a new bike. Currently leaning toward an endurance bike like Specialized Roubaix, Trek Domane and Cannondale Synapse.

I am riding a hybrid. It is comfortable on 40 mile rides. I am gradually increasing my distances.

Went on my first ride with a slow D group. No problem keeping up with those guys. Ride leader said he thought I would have no problem with the C group. But I would struggle in the B group.

I do not think a new bike would make the difference between being a C group rider and a B group rider. But I suspect it would help a bit.

Maybe a nicer, better fitting bike would be more comfortable.

And I think I would enjoy riding a higher quality bike, crisper shifting, smoother ride and I admit cooler. Maybe only cooler in my head, but that is really the only place it matters.

And I want a new toy.

Help me out here. I am working on rationalizing a splurge.....
The hand position on drop bar bikes is more ergonomic, making them comfortable on 100 mile, 200 km, 200 mile, etc. rides.

Aerodynamics and a supple set of road tires with low rolling resistance (too narrow to fit most hybrid rims) will make you faster too.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 08-25-20 at 02:56 PM.
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