Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Grant Petersen: So Fun to Read, but Rivendell Doesn't Appeal To Me

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Grant Petersen: So Fun to Read, but Rivendell Doesn't Appeal To Me

Old 09-18-20, 06:26 PM
  #1  
djcookie
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Grant Petersen: So Fun to Read, but Rivendell Doesn't Appeal To Me

I just re-read "Just Ride" for a second time. It's such a fun, entertaining, and often hilarious read. It's deliberately provocative, which accounts for a large part of the fun factor.

Two things: I disagree with almost all of his arguments and claims. I am much, much more comfortable in cycling specific gear, nearly 100% of the time. I definitely benefit from having more than 8 gears. I have no doubt lifting kettle bells increases strength, but I'm not inclined to use them any time soon. And on it goes.

I've perused the limited selection of rivendells and not surprisingly, the bikes look like old fashioned slugs to me. Even though they're brand new, they reek of garage sale rust and cobwebs.

How can a cyclist's ideas be so much fun to entertain yet be so unappealing when applied to actual bike design?
djcookie is offline  
Old 09-18-20, 06:35 PM
  #2  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 3,231

Bikes: Breezer Radar

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1718 Post(s)
Liked 992 Times in 468 Posts
Blocked and reported.





(kidding)

Last edited by tyrion; 09-18-20 at 07:49 PM.
tyrion is offline  
Likes For tyrion:
Old 09-18-20, 06:44 PM
  #3  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 4,647
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1906 Post(s)
Liked 1,038 Times in 548 Posts
For me, the appeal is the difference between a consumerist approach to cycling and a more hands on approach.

Clothing apart (I too like the function of kit) the modern direction in cycling is overpriced and overly complicated to the point where riders no longer build or maintain their own bikes. Todays must have latest and greatest is next years has been obsolescence. The talked about marketing and price point is now aimed at the financially well off and I feel a little sad for young people who may want to get into the sport but face the perception that you need a 5-10K CF electronically shifted niche bike to be relevant.

GP breaks from that mold and offers a different POV. Wear normal clothes, have a simple bike you can afford and adjust yourself. Try to be real and avoid the plastic ego imagery.

Having said that, Riv bikes tend to be overpriced themselves, like the boutique version of homespun ideas, and the anti establishment flannel vibe can be as constraining as the neon lycra one. I tend to flow between both worlds. I like the Riv aesthetic but would probably never buy one because I could build my own far cheaper (and enjoy the process). I wear flannel and lycra depending and don't mind modern technology if it facilitates a goal.

Garage sale rust and cobwebs to me sounds like someone who is unfamiliar with doing and too familiar with buying. Pick up a hex wrench and get your hands a little dirty. Or avoid it all and get virtual high fives on the Peleton.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 09-18-20 at 11:48 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Likes For Happy Feet:
Old 09-18-20, 06:59 PM
  #4  
livedarklions
I'm cross-chained
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 8,120

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Motobecane Fantom CX; Giant OCR A1

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4228 Post(s)
Liked 3,208 Times in 1,824 Posts
His bikes hold little appeal for me because I'm pretty comfortable doing century -plus rides on old steel racing bikes, so I get the beautiful lugged steel look at a fraction of the cost. I also love brifters and don't understand his aversion to them at all. But I don't see why agreeing or not agreeing with him has much to do with finding him an entertaining writer.

As to the clothes, I have no problem with people finding them more comfortable, I just get sick of people who put on airs just because I have no interest in cycling specific kit.
livedarklions is offline  
Likes For livedarklions:
Old 09-18-20, 07:16 PM
  #5  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 3,064
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2190 Post(s)
Liked 2,796 Times in 1,267 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
Having said that, Riv bikes tend to be overpriced themselves
The made-in-Taiwan Rivendells are bargains: beautiful lugged steel, wonderful paint work, and many very fine aesthetic details. Depending on the model, you can pick up a frameset (frame, fork, headset, BB, and seatpost) for about $1500, which is a bargain for that kind of craftsmanship.
Koyote is online now  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 09-18-20, 07:31 PM
  #6  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 4,647
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1906 Post(s)
Liked 1,038 Times in 548 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
The made-in-Taiwan Rivendells are bargains: beautiful lugged steel, wonderful paint work, and many very fine aesthetic details. Depending on the model, you can pick up a frameset (frame, fork, headset, BB, and seatpost) for about $1500, which is a bargain for that kind of craftsmanship.
I can see both sides.

If you don't want to do a lot of prep work a ready made frameset is nice. With a good eye, patience and elbow grease you can strip and refinished an old school rigid mtb for $50-$100. That savings allows me to add components to my bikes like Brooks saddles, good tires and nice grips if I choose.

I enjoy the process of the latter as a hobby in itself so the price differential is too great for me, but I don't look down on others who see it different.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 09-18-20 at 07:35 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 09-18-20, 07:52 PM
  #7  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 2,870

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 744 Post(s)
Liked 507 Times in 343 Posts
I would think a lot of the appeal is generational. The appeal of a lot of vintage items breaks along generational lines where they peak as that generation looks back with more disposable income and wanes when the next generation has their perspective on what appeals to them.

30 or 40 years from now the golden age of gravel bikes will be the sought after vintage bike.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Likes For 70sSanO:
Old 09-18-20, 07:55 PM
  #8  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 3,231

Bikes: Breezer Radar

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1718 Post(s)
Liked 992 Times in 468 Posts
I have heard Grant say something like: he knows he's a niche player, and feels he needs to stay a niche player - he doesn't want to compete with the big brands because he'd lose on economies of scale. I imagine it's getting more difficult for Riv now that gravel bikes are encroaching on their territory.
tyrion is offline  
Likes For tyrion:
Old 09-18-20, 08:13 PM
  #9  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 3,064
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2190 Post(s)
Liked 2,796 Times in 1,267 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I can see both sides.

If you don't want to do a lot of prep work a ready made frameset is nice. With a good eye, patience and elbow grease you can strip and refinished an old school rigid mtb for $50-$100. That savings allows me to add components to my bikes like Brooks saddles, good tires and nice grips if I choose.

I enjoy the process of the latter as a hobby in itself so the price differential is too great for me, but I don't look down on others who see it different.
Sure, of course, old frames are usually perfectly roadworthy. But if you look at a Riv, and look at the alternatives, they are downright bargains - if you want a new frame, and you like their frames. (Rim brakes, loads of tire clearance, etc.) I wouldn't mind having one just for the "wow" factor, because they really are gorgeous -- and for a particular set of preferences, they are terrific machines. But I already have a bike to fill that niche.

I'm gonna bet that the OP has never seen a Riv in person. I've never seen one that was short of stunning.

Last edited by Koyote; 09-18-20 at 08:31 PM.
Koyote is online now  
Old 09-18-20, 08:19 PM
  #10  
frogman
frogman
 
frogman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Napa Valley, CA
Posts: 588

Bikes: Wife says I have too many :-)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 198 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 68 Posts
What a sad topic for the BF !
Why do you want to trash Rivendell ? We get it that you don't like his bikes and you don't agree with Grant Petersons philosophy but no need to try and undermine his enterprise. They reek of garage rust and cobwebs, really ? Find a "constructive" topic.

Last edited by frogman; 09-18-20 at 08:28 PM.
frogman is offline  
Old 09-18-20, 10:17 PM
  #11  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,519
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 293 Post(s)
Liked 200 Times in 154 Posts
I think the fact it was this persons first post speaks volumes.
TugaDude is offline  
Old 09-18-20, 10:57 PM
  #12  
tomato coupe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,743

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1036 Post(s)
Liked 1,346 Times in 560 Posts
Never heard of the book before reading this thread, so I downloaded a copy and read it. For those that haven't read it, it reads like a collection of troll thread topics. Let's just say I'm glad I didn't pay anything for the book.
tomato coupe is offline  
Likes For tomato coupe:
Old 09-18-20, 11:07 PM
  #13  
Rolla
Gyro Captain
 
Rolla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 311

Bikes: Sycip, Black Mountain Cycles, Kona, Fairdale, WeThePeople

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Liked 270 Times in 133 Posts
I, for one, am glad that I live in a world with people like Grant Petersen in it. There's still plenty of carpet fiber racing bikes, lycra kit, watts meters, and bike bro attitude for those who are into it. I think it's great to have at least one company that flips the bird at modernity.
Rolla is offline  
Old 09-19-20, 04:16 AM
  #14  
blakcloud 
Senior Member
 
blakcloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 2,417

Bikes: Trek Domane SL7, Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Brompton S/M3L (modified)

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 517 Post(s)
Liked 232 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by djcookie View Post
Snipped. . .
I've perused the limited selection of rivendells and not surprisingly, the bikes look like old fashioned slugs to me. Even though they're brand new, they reek of garage sale rust and cobwebs.

How can a cyclist's ideas be so much fun to entertain yet be so unappealing when applied to actual bike design?
I think the entertaining part brings us back to when cycling was simpler kind of like the rotary telephone. It has that nostalgic feel and on some level makes sense. Unfortunately life changes, styles evolve and new needs are created. The beauty is we can have both. It doesn't have to be an either or proposition. Some days I ride my Rivendell in a pair of shorts, t shirt and running shoes and enjoy the simpler side of cycling. Other days I ride my Trek Domane in full kit (it would feel sacrilegious if I didn't wear it) and enjoy everything that carbon fiber and ISO Speed can muster.

I also would like to say I love the bolded text above. Those are great descriptors and gave me a chuckle.

Happy cycling.
blakcloud is offline  
Likes For blakcloud:
Old 09-19-20, 05:09 AM
  #15  
downhillmaster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 1,120
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 391 Times in 205 Posts
Originally Posted by djcookie View Post
I just re-read "Just Ride" for a second time. It's such a fun, entertaining, and often hilarious read. It's deliberately provocative, which accounts for a large part of the fun factor.

Two things: I disagree with almost all of his arguments and claims. I am much, much more comfortable in cycling specific gear, nearly 100% of the time. I definitely benefit from having more than 8 gears. I have no doubt lifting kettle bells increases strength, but I'm not inclined to use them any time soon. And on it goes.

I've perused the limited selection of rivendells and not surprisingly, the bikes look like old fashioned slugs to me. Even though they're brand new, they reek of garage sale rust and cobwebs.

How can a cyclist's ideas be so much fun to entertain yet be so unappealing when applied to actual bike design?
This silly post is poorly written and deliberately provocative
downhillmaster is offline  
Likes For downhillmaster:
Old 09-19-20, 05:26 AM
  #16  
DorkDisk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Kips Bay, NY
Posts: 1,720

Bikes: Ritchey Swiss Cross | Teesdale Kona Hot | Haro Extreme | Specialized Stumpjumper Comp | Cannondale F1000 | Shogun 1000 | Cannondale M500 | Norco Charger | Marin Muirwoods 29er | Hiawatha 3sp | Shogun Kaze | Breezer Lightning

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 375 Post(s)
Liked 441 Times in 245 Posts
Originally Posted by djcookie View Post
I just re-read "Just Ride" for a second time. It's such a fun, entertaining, and often hilarious read. It's deliberately provocative, which accounts for a large part of the fun factor.

Two things: I disagree with almost all of his arguments and claims. I am much, much more comfortable in cycling specific gear, nearly 100% of the time. I definitely benefit from having more than 8 gears. I have no doubt lifting kettle bells increases strength, but I'm not inclined to use them any time soon. And on it goes.

I've perused the limited selection of rivendells and not surprisingly, the bikes look like old fashioned slugs to me. Even though they're brand new, they reek of garage sale rust and cobwebs.

How can a cyclist's ideas be so much fun to entertain yet be so unappealing when applied to actual bike design?
So write your own book on cycling, and start your own bike company.

Rivbike and that book have been out for decades by now. Where have you been?
DorkDisk is offline  
Likes For DorkDisk:
Old 09-19-20, 05:45 AM
  #17  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,318
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1172 Post(s)
Liked 475 Times in 254 Posts
What I find most interesting is that Rivendell was way ahead of the curve 30 years ago, and just because they don't have carbon or alum frames and forks they are considered old looking and garage sale worthy. Grant Peterson created the gravel road category back in the 90's and every Riv is capable of such riding plus so much more. They are the definitive bike for gravel and all others constantly attempt to meet that definition. Race bike they are not, but seriously, how many of BF readers are race worthy themselves and utilize a race bike to its full potential? 10% at the very most?
TiHabanero is offline  
Likes For TiHabanero:
Old 09-19-20, 05:47 AM
  #18  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 988

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 362 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 230 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
Blocked and reported.
Originally Posted by frogman View Post
What a sad topic for the BF !
Why do you want to trash Rivendell ? We get it that you don't like his bikes and you don't agree with Grant Petersons philosophy but no need to try and undermine his enterprise. They reek of garage rust and cobwebs, really ? Find a "constructive" topic.
Originally Posted by TugaDude View Post
I think the fact it was this persons first post speaks volumes.
Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
This silly post is poorly written and deliberately provocative
Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
So write your own book on cycling, and start your own bike company.

Rivbike and that book have been out for decades by now. Where have you been?
+1

Another loser added to the ignore list. It's been growing at a healthy pace in recent months.
fishboat is online now  
Likes For fishboat:
Old 09-19-20, 06:03 AM
  #19  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 899

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 320 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
Never heard of the book before reading this thread,
Which might have been the intent of the original post.

I enjoyed the book. The guy got whiny and preachy at times, but if one can't handle that than don't hang out on this web site.

As for his approach to riding as the saying goes don't stretch the seams in trying on the coat. I feel his biggest message was just enjoy riding and don't get so caught up in what others think.

You may laugh at his advise for kettle balls/yoga, but I can barely walk these days due to too much riding and not enough alternative exercises. Things change as you get older, I'm in PT to rehab tight hip muscles. Sucks, this honestly has me worrying if I will ever ride week long tours again.

Last edited by Pop N Wood; 09-19-20 at 06:08 AM.
Pop N Wood is online now  
Old 09-19-20, 06:05 AM
  #20  
Pop N Wood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Maryland
Posts: 899

Bikes: 1982 Bianchi Sport SX, Rayleigh Tamland 1, Rans V-Rex recumbent, Fuji MTB, 80's Cannondale MTB with BBSHD ebike motor

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 320 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by fishboat View Post
Another loser added to the ignore list. It's been growing at a healthy pace in recent months.
Why do people brag about their ignore list?

Honestly, what do you gain by that?

Oops, guess I just made the list, huh Francis.
Pop N Wood is online now  
Likes For Pop N Wood:
Old 09-19-20, 06:06 AM
  #21  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 17,852

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4862 Post(s)
Liked 1,319 Times in 879 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
What I find most interesting is that Rivendell was way ahead of the curve 30 years ago, and just because they don't have carbon or alum frames and forks they are considered old looking and garage sale worthy. Grant Peterson created the gravel road category back in the 90's and every Riv is capable of such riding plus so much more. They are the definitive bike for gravel and all others constantly attempt to meet that definition. Race bike they are not, but seriously, how many of BF readers are race worthy themselves and utilize a race bike to its full potential? 10% at the very most?
Yep Grant Peterson designed some of the XO series bikes to be "fire" road bikes. They have road geometry and 26 inch wheels with room for a fat tire. Back in the 90s, if you wanted a fat tire road bike, 26 inch was the way to go. This is my "modernized" 1993 Bridgestone XO 2 with brifters and 3 x 8 gearing.

bikemig is online now  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 09-19-20, 06:18 AM
  #22  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: 1973 Windsor Profesional,1976 Kabuki diamond formula with full Campy, 1977 Raleigh Competition GS , 1971 Stella original Campy equip. 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1972 Italvega Gran Rally ,1972 Super Mondia Special,Medici Pro Strada,Colnago

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 335 Post(s)
Liked 481 Times in 323 Posts
There are some who love Rivindel Bikes and others that do not. I am another vintage road bike rider so I can get a classic with full Campagnolo for a lot less. This is just me, I like cleaning up and getting neglected racers back on the road. I like the way the bikes(Riv) look but it just is not my style. Grant has always been very supportive of the cycling community and is a great writer, although with a strong opinion, I find his work enjoyable. Bike forums is about information and opinion and the OP just stated his opinion. As long as we don't bash someone I see no harm. Rivendel is a niche bike and attracts criticisms from time to time.
Kabuki12 is offline  
Likes For Kabuki12:
Old 09-19-20, 07:34 AM
  #23  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 988

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 362 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 230 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
Why do people brag about their ignore list?

Honestly, what do you gain by that?

Oops, guess I just made the list, huh Francis.
You've been on it for quite a while already
fishboat is online now  
Old 09-19-20, 07:45 AM
  #24  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 28,384

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 454 Times in 291 Posts
Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
Why do people brag about their ignore list?
Smugness

Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
Honestly, what do you gain by that?
"Likes" from Fellow Smugsters
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Likes For I-Like-To-Bike:
Old 09-19-20, 08:01 AM
  #25  
FiftySix
I'm the anecdote.
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,822

Bikes: '12 Schwinn, '13 Norco

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1108 Post(s)
Liked 1,162 Times in 788 Posts
Originally Posted by djcookie View Post
I just re-read "Just Ride" for a second time. It's such a fun, entertaining, and often hilarious read. It's deliberately provocative, which accounts for a large part of the fun factor.

Two things: I disagree with almost all of his arguments and claims. I am much, much more comfortable in cycling specific gear, nearly 100% of the time. I definitely benefit from having more than 8 gears. I have no doubt lifting kettle bells increases strength, but I'm not inclined to use them any time soon. And on it goes.

I've perused the limited selection of rivendells and not surprisingly, the bikes look like old fashioned slugs to me. Even though they're brand new, they reek of garage sale rust and cobwebs.

How can a cyclist's ideas be so much fun to entertain yet be so unappealing when applied to actual bike design?
I have a copy of that book that I found in a Goodwill a couple years ago. I like much of the content in that book since I'm truly an unracer/uncyclist and have been my entire life on bikes. Too bad that Rivendell bikes are out of my budget, otherwise I'd really entertain the idea of owning one.

Funny thing about Petersen's commentary on 8 gears. My current two bikes are an 8-speed and a 1-speed, and I really only use up to 4 gears on that 8-speed since it isn't hilly here. Plenty of wind, though.

Some of his bodily health ideas don't jibe with mine, but others do. Not everyone is built the same, so one example is that I have to hydrate before a ride and not "wait until I'm thirsty". I'd pass the hell out otherwise.

The funny thing is, I bet that many of the riders that Mr. Petersen wrote that book for never read the book or even know that it exists.

Last edited by FiftySix; 09-19-20 at 08:20 AM. Reason: grammar? Don't judge me, English teacher.
FiftySix is offline  
Likes For FiftySix:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.