Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

105 FD (50-34t) and cassette 11-42t Deore XT CS M8000

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

105 FD (50-34t) and cassette 11-42t Deore XT CS M8000

Old 10-03-20, 05:13 AM
  #1  
Blueflikk04
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
105 FD (50-34t) and cassette 11-42t Deore XT CS M8000

Can I use MTB cassette with my current 11s Shimano 105. May current cassette is 11-34t.

to be honest, i'm having hard time to go uphill with current cassette (newbie here).

So i'm planning to put the Deore XT cs M8000 (11-42t) but i'm still gonna use my crankset of 50-34t.

i would really appreciate if you can advise me if this is okay before I order the cassette.

if this is not possible, any suggestion you can share with me? Thank you so much.
Blueflikk04 is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 06:02 AM
  #2  
c_m_shooter
Senior Member
 
c_m_shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Paradise, TX
Posts: 1,895

Bikes: Soma Pescadero, Surly Pugsley, Salsa Fargo, Schwinn Klunker, Gravity SS 27.5, Monocog 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Liked 133 Times in 101 Posts
Your rear derailer may not clear the big cassette, it is hard to know. You will need a new longer chain. If you can deal with these obsticles, as long as the cassette has the same number of gears you have now, you are good.
c_m_shooter is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 06:56 AM
  #3  
Paul Barnard
For The Fun of It
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Louisissippi Coast
Posts: 4,835

Bikes: Lynskey Backroad, Litespeed T6, Lynskey MT29, Burley Duet

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1526 Post(s)
Liked 812 Times in 413 Posts
Assuming you have a 105 medium cage length rear derailleur, the answer is no. The derailleur does not have the "wrap capacity."

chain wrap capacity ? CanooterValve

The answer to all of your follow up questions is no as well. You can't get what you want with road shifters and derailleurs and that front crankset.
Paul Barnard is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 07:34 AM
  #4  
Bryan C. 
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 69 Posts
It is possible but you will need a new rear derailleur as well.

It has been done before with an Ultegra RX derailleur and also with the GRX 810 derailleur. Both of these are compatible with your 105 11 speed shifters. You will need a longer chain, and some free time to adjust your b-screw and chain length so it all works ok.

You may not be able to use the small/small gear combination but that wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.

Last edited by Bryan C.; 10-03-20 at 07:51 AM.
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 09:18 AM
  #5  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,815

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 588 Posts
Originally Posted by Bryan C. View Post
It is possible but you will need a new rear derailleur as well.

It has been done before with an Ultegra RX derailleur and also with the GRX 810 derailleur. Both of these are compatible with your 105 11 speed shifters. You will need a longer chain, and some free time to adjust your b-screw and chain length so it all works ok.

You may not be able to use the small/small gear combination but that wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.
I'm sure people have 'made it work' but it's definitely not correct. The 812 will work w/ the 42t cassette, but it's for a 1x crank...it doesn't wrap enough chain for a double. The 810 derailleur does wrap more chain, it's capacity is 41t, but it will only work w/ a 34t cassette. Same w/ the RX derailleur. You might be able to get a 36 to work but a 42 is wayyyy past the spec of both those derailleurs. Adjusting the b-tension screw so the derailleur will shift to an overly large cog will mess up the shifting on the small cog side of the cassette as the upper pulley is too far away to shift accurately.
It would be great if people understood derailleur specs in general and capacity in particular before posting advice like the above. This thread should also be posted in 'bicycle mechanics' for obvious reasons and not GD.
cxwrench is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 09:44 AM
  #6  
Bryan C. 
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
I'm sure people have 'made it work' but it's definitely not correct. The 812 will work w/ the 42t cassette, but it's for a 1x crank...it doesn't wrap enough chain for a double. The 810 derailleur does wrap more chain, it's capacity is 41t, but it will only work w/ a 34t cassette. Same w/ the RX derailleur. You might be able to get a 36 to work but a 42 is wayyyy past the spec of both those derailleurs. Adjusting the b-tension screw so the derailleur will shift to an overly large cog will mess up the shifting on the small cog side of the cassette as the upper pulley is too far away to shift accurately.
It would be great if people understood derailleur specs in general and capacity in particular before posting advice like the above. This thread should also be posted in 'bicycle mechanics' for obvious reasons and not GD.

Just because Shimano says it won't work doesn't actually mean it won't work. Their super conservative specs are designed around optimal operating ranges. Not necessarily real world specs.

Maybe the problem is people like you who see the specifications as hard limits? So if it works, and works pretty well, then it's still not ok? Give me a break....

BTW, I do practice what I preach....

Last edited by Bryan C.; 10-03-20 at 09:54 AM.
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 10:05 AM
  #7  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,815

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 588 Posts
Originally Posted by Bryan C. View Post
Just because Shimano says it won't work doesn't actually mean it won't work. Their super conservative specs are designed around optimal operating ranges. Not necessarily real world specs.

Maybe the problem is people like you who see the specifications as hard limits? So if it works, and works pretty well, then it's still not ok? Give me a break....

BTW, I do practice what I preach....
I'm a professional mechanic, I work in a shop. We have certain liabilities to consider. Where do you suggest I draw the line? Is the line blurry? What works on one bike may obviously not work on another. I'll stick with Shimano spec and not have to worry about it. In your case I would preface any advice you give that involves not sticking to spec by saying: 'This is my personal experience. I realize that I'm not doing this according to the manufacturer's recommendations...your results may vary'.
cxwrench is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 10:06 AM
  #8  
Bryan C. 
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
I'm a professional mechanic, I work in a shop. We have certain liabilities to consider. Where do you suggest I draw the line? Is the line blurry? What works on one bike may obviously not work on another. I'll stick with Shimano spec and not have to worry about it. In your case I would preface any advice you give that involves not sticking to spec by saying: 'This is my personal experience. I realize that I'm not doing this according to the manufacturer's recommendations...your results may vary'.
Lol, ok.
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 06:19 PM
  #9  
Elvo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 4,649
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 564 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 287 Times in 157 Posts
Yes you can make it work with a road link and mid cage derailleur. You probably will not have enough chain wrap to use the 11/13T with your 34T front though
Elvo is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 08:23 PM
  #10  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,815

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 588 Posts
Originally Posted by Elvo View Post
Yes you can make it work with a road link and mid cage derailleur. You probably will not have enough chain wrap to use the 11/13T with your 34T front though
Definitely not great advice. See previous posts.
cxwrench is offline  
Old 10-03-20, 08:53 PM
  #11  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by Blueflikk04 View Post
Can I use MTB cassette with my current 11s Shimano 105. May current cassette is 11-34t.

to be honest, i'm having hard time to go uphill with current cassette (newbie here).

So i'm planning to put the Deore XT cs M8000 (11-42t) but i'm still gonna use my crankset of 50-34t.

i would really appreciate if you can advise me if this is okay before I order the cassette.

if this is not possible, any suggestion you can share with me? Thank you so much.
I'm assuming that you have the mid-cage (GS) derailleur.

It goes well beyond the wrap of your derailleur, so assuming you use the Shimano chain sizing method (big-big plus an inch), the drivetrain is going to go slack if you try to use your small cogs while in the small chainring.
It also goes beyond the max cog of your rear derailleur, which means that you may end up needing a hanger extender, depending on the bike. Or maybe it'll work if you merely screw the b-screw pretty far in.
The drivetrain also might end up more prone to baulky shifting, but this is hard to predict and also depends on your pedaling and shifting style.

Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Is the line blurry?
In terms of liability, no. In terms of functionality, yes. And importantly...

I'll stick with Shimano spec and not have to worry about it.
...Shimano doesn't spec a drivetrain that does what the OP wants. No manufacturer does. A zero-compromise "not have to worry about it" option does not exist.

Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
The 810 derailleur does wrap more chain, it's capacity is 41t, but it will only work w/ a 34t cassette. Same w/ the RX derailleur. You might be able to get a 36 to work but a 42 is wayyyy past the spec of both those derailleurs. Adjusting the b-tension screw so the derailleur will shift to an overly large cog will mess up the shifting on the small cog side of the cassette as the upper pulley is too far away to shift accurately.
That's a fair concern, but an RD-RX810 isn't necessarily a bad option. It's got a very wide range of b-screw adjustment and an impressive ability to tolerate nonsense. I have one friend using it on their Cervelo Aspero with a 48-32 crankset and an 11-50 (!!!) cassette, with seemingly reasonable shifting.
HTupolev is offline  
Likes For HTupolev:
Old 10-03-20, 11:31 PM
  #12  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,491

Bikes: 2021 Polygon Siskiu T8, Soma Fog Cutter, 1992 Trek 970 1991 Fuji Sundance

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked 359 Times in 208 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
I'm sure people have 'made it work' but it's definitely not correct. The 812 will work w/ the 42t cassette, but it's for a 1x crank...it doesn't wrap enough chain for a double. The 810 derailleur does wrap more chain, it's capacity is 41t, but it will only work w/ a 34t cassette. Same w/ the RX derailleur. You might be able to get a 36 to work but a 42 is wayyyy past the spec of both those derailleurs. Adjusting the b-tension screw so the derailleur will shift to an overly large cog will mess up the shifting on the small cog side of the cassette as the upper pulley is too far away to shift accurately.
It would be great if people understood derailleur specs in general and capacity in particular before posting advice like the above. This thread should also be posted in 'bicycle mechanics' for obvious reasons and not GD.
Op did not specify that he wishes to stay within Shimano's specifications. The mentioned rear dérailleurs will clear a 42t cassette, whether it's recommended or not.



However, I was never using those gears, so the bike now has a 36t cassette.
katsup is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 07:35 AM
  #13  
Bryan C. 
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Definitely not great advice. See previous posts.
So your opinion is the only one that counts? Get real. The question was asked and answered by people who have actually done what the OP asked. It's fine to put forth your opinion, but stop acting like you're an expert. You claim you are a "professional." Yet all you do is follow the directions in the dealer manual explicitly?
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 09:23 AM
  #14  
cxwrench
Senior Member
 
cxwrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Nor-Cal
Posts: 1,815

Bikes: lots

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 1,054 Times in 588 Posts
Originally Posted by Bryan C. View Post
So your opinion is the only one that counts? Get real. The question was asked and answered by people who have actually done what the OP asked. It's fine to put forth your opinion, but stop acting like you're an expert. You claim you are a "professional." Yet all you do is follow the directions in the dealer manual explicitly?
Wanna compare resumes sometime? Part of being 'professional' is making things work. Part of it is not taking chances in certain instances. I will definitely stick to the manual/spec when the differences are so big. Pairing a medium cage RD 8000 w/ a 36t cog? Probably gonna work fine every time. Pairing that same derailleur w/ a 42? Not even gonna try. I don't give a rats ass if that's what the customer wants. If they want it that bad they can do it themselves.
cxwrench is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 09:35 AM
  #15  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,508
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
Could the OP just get a 30/46 crankset instead? Sound like the most straight forward thing to me.

FWIW, I believe are ways to get what the OP wants to work - isn’t this what a goat link does? Folks were getting MTB RDs to work with 42t cogs for quite a while before Shimano and SRAM started making RDs rated for anything over 36t. but these can be finicky and not the best idea for a self-professed newb to take on.

But like others have said, you will likely lose one or more of your small/small combos. And I would not care for the wider gear ratio spacing for a road bike.

Last edited by Kapusta; 10-04-20 at 09:43 AM.
Kapusta is offline  
Likes For Kapusta:
Old 10-04-20, 10:02 AM
  #16  
Bryan C. 
nothing to see here
 
Bryan C.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Wanna compare resumes sometime? Part of being 'professional' is making things work. Part of it is not taking chances in certain instances. I will definitely stick to the manual/spec when the differences are so big. Pairing a medium cage RD 8000 w/ a 36t cog? Probably gonna work fine every time. Pairing that same derailleur w/ a 42? Not even gonna try. I don't give a rats ass if that's what the customer wants. If they want it that bad they can do it themselves.
Bryan C. is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 10:13 AM
  #17  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
Not even gonna try. I don't give a rats ass if that's what the customer wants. If they want it that bad they can do it themselves.
Due to the liability issue, I think it's reasonable for bike shops to turn away this sort of work. But I'm not sure what that has to do with this thread: the OP isn't asking you to work on their bike, they're asking if the thing they want to do can be done.

Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Could the OP just get a 30/46 crankset instead? Sound like the most straight forward thing to me.
If the OP doesn't need the top-end, smaller chainrings can be a great alternative. Less stress to drivetrain specs, and tighter gear spacing. A 30-34 is still a 10% higher gear that the 34-42 that the OP wants, though. Changing to a 46-30 would also likely more expensive than the cassette change, and availability of road-width sub-compact cranks just isn't very good.

I wish that itsy-bitsy subcompact road-width cranks were better-supported in the market, because a lot of cyclists don't need anything close to the top-end gears that modern road bikes use.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 10:36 AM
  #18  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,508
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Due to the liability issue, I think it's reasonable for bike shops to turn away this sort of work. But I'm not sure what that has to do with this thread: the OP isn't asking you to work on their bike, they're asking if the thing they want to do can be done.


If the OP doesn't need the top-end, smaller chainrings can be a great alternative. Less stress to drivetrain specs, and tighter gear spacing. A 30-34 is still a 10% higher gear that the 34-42 that the OP wants, though. Changing to a 46-30 would also likely more expensive than the cassette change, and availability of road-width sub-compact cranks just isn't very good.

I wish that itsy-bitsy subcompact road-width cranks were better-supported in the market, because a lot of cyclists don't need anything close to the top-end gears that modern road bikes use.
30/46 cranksets options have greatly expanded over the past year.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 04:28 PM
  #19  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
30/46 cranksets options have greatly expanded over the past year.
Yes, but cranks that support it still aren't standard, and smaller chainring options remain very sparse.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 04:49 PM
  #20  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,508
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Yes, but cranks that support it still aren't standard, and smaller chainring options remain very sparse.
Yes, standard (or compact) cranks do not support it. That is why I was suggesting the OP get a 30/46 CRANKSET.

Shimano GRX FC-RX600-2

30/46, just under $150, and widely available.

Last edited by Kapusta; 10-04-20 at 04:53 PM.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 05:05 PM
  #21  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Yes, standard (or compact) cranks do not support it. That is why I was suggesting the OP get a 30/46 CRANKSET.
Yes, I know. When I said "standard", I wasn't referring to 53-39, I was referring to cranks that road bikes generally come with. I was pointing out that a new crankset would be required, my point being that this...

just under $150


...is far more expensive than a new cassette. And, furthermore, that the OP would still have to get a new cassette anyway to achieve the low-end that they want, because 30-34 is significantly higher than 34-42.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 06:44 PM
  #22  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,508
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Yes, I know. When I said "standard", I wasn't referring to 53-39, I was referring to cranks that road bikes generally come with. I was pointing out that a new crankset would be required, my point being that this...



...is far more expensive than a new cassette. And, furthermore, that the OP would still have to get a new cassette anyway to achieve the low-end that they want, because 30-34 is significantly higher than 34-42.
How much more expensive are we talking about? The cassette the OP is looking at is at least $80, plus $22 for a Roadlink, plus ~$25 for a new chain because the old one will be too short, So that is ~$127 (a whopping $23 savings) for a setup that has big ratio jumps and does not have the chain wrap capacity needed, so he loses some combos.

You are correct that 30/34 is a higher than 34/42. HoweverI think in reality that even the 30/34 is enough of a change that the OP is going to really notice it on a climb. And heck, if that is not enough (which is unlikely, IMO), then he can probably get a cassette with a 36t cog to work with his RD. Yes it is more money overall, but the RD will likely not run into chain wrap issues, nor will he need to deal with stuff like RoadLinks. And he keeps the gear ratio jumps the way they are.

Anyway, If I were in the OPs position and wanted lower gears, I'd just get the sub-compact crank. And that is exactly what I did when my wife wanted lower gears, and that is what I am likely going to do with my own gravel bike soon.

To each his own, I guess.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 06:54 PM
  #23  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
How much more expensive are we talking about? The cassette the OP is looking at is at least $80, plus $22 for a Roadlink, plus ~$25 for a new chain because the old one will be too short, So that is ~$127 (a whopping $23 savings) for a setup that has big ratio jumps and does not have the chain wrap capacity needed, so he loses some combos.

You are correct that 30/34 is a higher than 34/42. HoweverI think in reality that even the 30/34 is enough of a change that the OP is going to really notice it on a climb. And heck, if that is not enough (which is unlikely, IMO), then he can probably get a cassette with a 36t cog to work with his RD. Yes it is more money overall, but the RD will likely not run into chain wrap issues, nor will he need to deal with stuff like RoadLinks.
A roadlink sometimes isn't necessary, and a new cassette would kick the cost difference back up by another $50+.

To each his own, I guess.
Ultimately it depends on the use case. If the 46-30 with an 11-34 covers adequate range, in most cases it'll be a better setup than swapping to the 11-42. But 50-34 11-42 has a higher top-end and a lower low-end, if you have use for those gears it might be a better drivetrain (and cheaper) than swapping out the cranks.
(Granted, the OP most likely isn't in dire need of their 50-11 top-end.)
HTupolev is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 07:07 PM
  #24  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,508
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1937 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
A roadlink sometimes isn't necessary, and a new cassette would kick the cost difference back up by another $50+.
I am having a hard time seeing a RoadLink (or something similar) NOT being needed to get a 11sp 105 RD to work with a 42t cog.

Yes, that would be an extra $50, making this ~$75 more total. But well worth it, IMO. With a 30/36 low gear, that is getting reasonably close to 34/42 without the drawbacks (wide spacing, lost ratios,).

Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Ultimately it depends on the use case. If the 46-30 with an 11-34 covers adequate range, in most cases it'll be a better setup than swapping to the 11-42. But 50-34 11-42 has a higher top-end and a lower low-end, if you have use for those gears it might be a better drivetrain (and cheaper) than swapping out the cranks.
(Granted, the OP most likely isn't in dire need of their 50-11 top-end.)
Agreed. Hey, some people don't mind wider gear ratio spacing, anyway. And they learn not to cross chain into small-small combos.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 10-04-20, 07:18 PM
  #25  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,848
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1757 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 443 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
I am having a hard time seeing a RoadLink (or something similar) NOT being needed to get a 11sp 105 RD to work with a 42t cog.
I know someone who does it.

TimothyH here did it with an Ultegra RX derailleur which has basically the same wrap and cog ratings:
Cannondale Topstone 105 - Shimano 11-42 Cassette Possible?
Cannondale Topstone 105 - Shimano 11-42 Cassette Possible?
HTupolev is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.