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What Accessories Do You Have?

Old 10-10-20, 08:31 AM
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Cacti
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What Accessories Do You Have?

My bike will be here in less than a month and I'm trying to figure out all of the accessories I'll want before it gets here. My rides will be pretty short to start. Maybe 40 minutes to an hour and mostly on paved flats
  • Helmet- I'm thinking that's a must. They range anywhere from $60 to +$200. My main goal is not to crack my head open if I take a spill. I doubt I'll be going more than 15mph, so how much do I need to spend? I hear some of them allow you to listen to music while still being able to hear what's going on around you
  • Gloves- Do I really need them?
  • Cycling pants- I'm sure those of you who are serious riders are geared up for it. But I really don't want to look like Lance Armstrong. I hear it can get pretty uncomfortable if you don't have ass pads, but again. My rides will be short and on the flats. Do you guys recommend special pants?
  • Ditto for any special riding shirt
  • Ditto for special shoes
  • Stand pump- I hear I'll need one and it makes sense to have one, so that's a must, right?
  • Patch kit- I'm not planning on blowing a tire, but who ever does? Not sure I'd even know how to replace or patch an innertube. And if it's recommended, do I need a special mount underneath my seat? Does it include a mini air pump?
  • Rearview mirror- I'll probably want one (not sure it's needed). I've heard pros and cons to a helmet mirror or one attached to the handle bars. Any recommendations for the casual rider who will be riding mainly on bike/walking paths?
  • Water bottle mount- I'll definitely want this and someone recommended I get two for longer rides. They don't seem to come together, so how do I know the mount(s) I buy will fit the water bottles I'll buy?
  • Phone mount- I see bikes that have what looks to be a phone mounted on the handle bars. Not sure if it's a phone or something only fanatical cyclists use, but it would be cool to mount my phone to use My ride or GPS to track my distance
  • Bell- I'm not much for talking and would much rather ring a bell than having to keep announcing "on your left" to joggers and walkers. That said, a bell seems kind of dorky to me. Could be my bias from only girls having them on their bikes when I was a kid
  • Extra tubes- Whether I get a patch kit or not, it seems I'll want at least one spare inner tube to keep at home
  • Lube/grease- When I was a kid, my father used to oil up my chains and axles, etc. I assume it's still important to keep your chains smooth. What type of stuff do I need to get for this?
  • Mask- Believe it or not, I've been seeing cyclists wearing mask during this pandemic. I wasn't planning to, but now that they're saying virus particles can hang in the air for hours, it would suck to get sick doing something I'm hoping will improve my health. Few people wear masks where I live and I don't want to be riding through everyone's vapor trail my whole ride. Any thoughts on wearing a mask while riding?
That's all I can think of for now. This will all cost more than the bike itself lol. Again, I'll probably be a casual (but every day) rider. But it would be nice to be prepared or having GPS since I'm not familiar with the trails around me yet. I'd appreciate any advice between what I'll definitely want, what would be nice to have, and what I can do without for now

Thanks,
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Old 10-10-20, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Cacti View Post
My bike will be here in less than a month and I'm trying to figure out all of the accessories I'll want before it gets here. My rides will be pretty short to start. Maybe 40 minutes to an hour and mostly on paved flats
  • Helmet- I'm thinking that's a must. They range anywhere from $60 to +$200. My main goal is not to crack my head open if I take a spill. I doubt I'll be going more than 15mph, so how much do I need to spend? I hear some of them allow you to listen to music while still being able to hear what's going on around you
  • Gloves- Do I really need them?
  • Cycling pants- I'm sure those of you who are serious riders are geared up for it. But I really don't want to look like Lance Armstrong. I hear it can get pretty uncomfortable if you don't have ass pads, but again. My rides will be short and on the flats. Do you guys recommend special pants?
  • Ditto for any special riding shirt
  • Ditto for special shoes
  • Stand pump- I hear I'll need one and it makes sense to have one, so that's a must, right?
  • Patch kit- I'm not planning on blowing a tire, but who ever does? Not sure I'd even know how to replace or patch an innertube. And if it's recommended, do I need a special mount underneath my seat? Does it include a mini air pump?
  • Rearview mirror- I'll probably want one (not sure it's needed). I've heard pros and cons to a helmet mirror or one attached to the handle bars. Any recommendations for the casual rider who will be riding mainly on bike/walking paths?
  • Water bottle mount- I'll definitely want this and someone recommended I get two for longer rides. They don't seem to come together, so how do I know the mount(s) I buy will fit the water bottles I'll buy?
  • Phone mount- I see bikes that have what looks to be a phone mounted on the handle bars. Not sure if it's a phone or something only fanatical cyclists use, but it would be cool to mount my phone to use My ride or GPS to track my distance
  • Bell- I'm not much for talking and would much rather ring a bell than having to keep announcing "on your left" to joggers and walkers. That said, a bell seems kind of dorky to me. Could be my bias from only girls having them on their bikes when I was a kid
  • Extra tubes- Whether I get a patch kit or not, it seems I'll want at least one spare inner tube to keep at home
  • Lube/grease- When I was a kid, my father used to oil up my chains and axles, etc. I assume it's still important to keep your chains smooth. What type of stuff do I need to get for this?
  • Mask- Believe it or not, I've been seeing cyclists wearing mask during this pandemic. I wasn't planning to, but now that they're saying virus particles can hang in the air for hours, it would suck to get sick doing something I'm hoping will improve my health. Few people wear masks where I live and I don't want to be riding through everyone's vapor trail my whole ride. Any thoughts on wearing a mask while riding?
That's all I can think of for now. This will all cost more than the bike itself lol. Again, I'll probably be a casual (but every day) rider. But it would be nice to be prepared or having GPS since I'm not familiar with the trails around me yet. I'd appreciate any advice between what I'll definitely want, what would be nice to have, and what I can do without for now

Thanks,
Helmet - Kali Therapy $100
Gloves - Yes for sure, look for ones on sale online. What you get should be dictated by the weather. Gloves are a must.
Lube - The easiest by far to use is Rock N Roll Gold. Highly recommend.
Tubes - Yes Continental brand.
Tires - The tires coming on your bike most likely suck. Plan on replacing them with Continentals, Pirellis or Vittorias.
Shoes - Yes get what are comfortable
Pedals - Shimano 105
Clothes - Bike specific clothes are not needed. Look on Nike or Underarmour for compression liners, compression shorts and long tights. You might need a jacket. Both companies sell warm weather and cold weather stuff. Depends on where you live.

Buy this stuff online. Excel Sports, BikeTiresDirect, My Bike Store, etc.

Last edited by Mulberry20; 10-10-20 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 10-10-20, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Cacti View Post
My bike will be here in less than a month and I'm trying to figure out all of the accessories I'll want before it gets here. My rides will be pretty short to start. Maybe 40 minutes to an hour and mostly on paved flats
  • Helmet- I'm thinking that's a must. They range anywhere from $60 to +$200. My main goal is not to crack my head open if I take a spill. I doubt I'll be going more than 15mph, so how much do I need to spend? I hear some of them allow you to listen to music while still being able to hear what's going on around you
  • Gloves- Do I really need them?
  • Cycling pants- I'm sure those of you who are serious riders are geared up for it. But I really don't want to look like Lance Armstrong. I hear it can get pretty uncomfortable if you don't have ass pads, but again. My rides will be short and on the flats. Do you guys recommend special pants?
  • Ditto for any special riding shirt
  • Ditto for special shoes
  • Stand pump- I hear I'll need one and it makes sense to have one, so that's a must, right?
  • Patch kit- I'm not planning on blowing a tire, but who ever does? Not sure I'd even know how to replace or patch an innertube. And if it's recommended, do I need a special mount underneath my seat? Does it include a mini air pump?
  • Rearview mirror- I'll probably want one (not sure it's needed). I've heard pros and cons to a helmet mirror or one attached to the handle bars. Any recommendations for the casual rider who will be riding mainly on bike/walking paths?
  • Water bottle mount- I'll definitely want this and someone recommended I get two for longer rides. They don't seem to come together, so how do I know the mount(s) I buy will fit the water bottles I'll buy?
  • Phone mount- I see bikes that have what looks to be a phone mounted on the handle bars. Not sure if it's a phone or something only fanatical cyclists use, but it would be cool to mount my phone to use My ride or GPS to track my distance
  • Bell- I'm not much for talking and would much rather ring a bell than having to keep announcing "on your left" to joggers and walkers. That said, a bell seems kind of dorky to me. Could be my bias from only girls having them on their bikes when I was a kid
  • Extra tubes- Whether I get a patch kit or not, it seems I'll want at least one spare inner tube to keep at home
  • Lube/grease- When I was a kid, my father used to oil up my chains and axles, etc. I assume it's still important to keep your chains smooth. What type of stuff do I need to get for this?
  • Mask- Believe it or not, I've been seeing cyclists wearing mask during this pandemic. I wasn't planning to, but now that they're saying virus particles can hang in the air for hours, it would suck to get sick doing something I'm hoping will improve my health. Few people wear masks where I live and I don't want to be riding through everyone's vapor trail my whole ride. Any thoughts on wearing a mask while riding?
That's all I can think of for now. This will all cost more than the bike itself lol. Again, I'll probably be a casual (but every day) rider. But it would be nice to be prepared or having GPS since I'm not familiar with the trails around me yet. I'd appreciate any advice between what I'll definitely want, what would be nice to have, and what I can do without for now

Thanks,
In order.
  • Yes get a helmet. I'd focus on the ~$80 range for you, something with MIPS. Buy from somewhere you can return. The most important factor for you is that the helmet fits and is comfortable.
  • Get gloves. Not sure where you are, but it's going to be cold outside. Also they can help a bit with sweat and if you wipe out they offer a bit of protection from ripping up your hands.
  • If your rides are only about 40 minutes, then just wear something comfortable. You won't want though to be sweating in a pair of jeans, so maybe a pair of sweatpants. For shorts, you can also look at bottoms made for MTB riding, which have pads, but look more like regular shorts. I think they make these in a long pant version as well. There are also padded/chamois undershorts that you can wear under pants, eg. https://www.rei.com/c/mens-cycling-underwear
  • Cycling shirts are good because they have pockets that are out of the way. If you don't plan on carrying anything you need access to over the 40 minute ride, you could wear whatever you want..
  • Shoes.. Initially just use platform pedals and some sneakers (skateboard type shoes (Vans, Nike SB are good style). Figure out later if you want to do more in this space.
  • Yes, you need a pump. Cheaper but decent are the Topeak Joe Blow series.
  • Patch kit/Tubes. Buy a couple spare tubes. A patch kit can also be added.. easier though on the road (if you're away from home), to put in a new tube and save the patching til you get home. Buy a rear under-saddle bag to hold the spare tubes, plus some tire levers, plus whatever else (wallet, keys, phone, etc) If you don't want to think about what to get too much, something like this can get you started: https://www.performancebike.com/lezy...t-v204/p351857
  • Get a cool bell if you think they're dorky -- maybe a Spurcycle or similar. Sometimes they're required by local laws anyway.
  • Chain Lube.. pick up some Rock n'Roll Gold. Decent stuff and not too overpriced.
  • Mask.. I only ride with one in areas where people are concentrated (eg. if you're on a crowded MUP or a bridge path).
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Old 10-10-20, 09:17 AM
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  • The helmet is easy. Giro's $55 Isode MIPS is inexpensive and has good technology behind it. They even took the sizing conundrum out of the equation.
  • Gloves -- you may never need them, but take a spill on pavement in bare hands, and you'll wish you had them.
  • Shorts and jersey -- a wicking top is great when it's hot out, and the chamois in a pair of shorts can make long rides more comfortable. I just wear a padded liner under whatever shorts I've got on, and a wicking T-shirt.
  • Shoes -- stiffer soles do make a difference.
  • A floor pump for home and a mini pump for the ride -- yes to both.
  • Mirror -- nah. Turn your head.
  • Phone mount -- nah. Unplug for awhile and don't try to quantify your riding. Just ride.
  • Bell -- sure, if you're going to be on bike paths or trails.
  • Extra tubes -- yes. And a patch kit, tire irons, and a mini-tool.
  • Lube -- yes. Not WD-40. Not canola oil. Get some actual bike lube. Tri-Flow, T-9, whatever your LBS recommends.
  • Mask -- up to you.
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Old 10-10-20, 09:22 AM
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If you plan on riding on any roads, a front and rear light.
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Old 10-10-20, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Rhondito View Post
If you plan on riding on any roads, a front and rear light.
Yes, Cateye Loop 2 set is very good and reasonably priced.

Last edited by Mulberry20; 10-10-20 at 10:39 AM.
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Old 10-10-20, 10:30 AM
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NFS is the best chain lube.
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Old 10-10-20, 10:50 AM
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I would suggest a folding tool gadget unless you have tools already. Allen wrenches are a must in fact allen head screws are basically every screw on most bikes.
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Old 10-10-20, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Cacti View Post
Bell- I'm not much for talking and would much rather ring a bell than having to keep announcing "on your left" to joggers and walkers. That said, a bell seems kind of dorky to me. Could be my bias from only girls having them on their bikes when I was a kid
I got a bell but had to take it off the bike. It was so much fun I couldn't keep from ringing it. It was probably annoying my riding buddies. I think it would be very useful on a MUP, much more elegant than shouting. Also, if you are riding on a MUP you don't have to worry about the dork factor. As for the mask, you should always have one with you even if you don't wear it while riding.
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Old 10-10-20, 12:35 PM
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Thank you everyone for the prompt and terrific responses!

I'm sold on the need for gloves, lube, and at least a padded liner. Also, some comfortable hard soled shoes

I would still like to mount my phone however. Or is it some other gadget that serious bikers use? I always see them on the handle bars. I'd like to track my miles and avg speed if possible

No one addressed the water bottle mounts and/or how to make sure the bottles will fit. Are they sold together? I'll check out some of the stores recommended and see what I can find

Thanks again,
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Old 10-10-20, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Cacti View Post
Thank you everyone for the prompt and terrific responses!

I'm sold on the need for gloves, lube, and at least a padded liner. Also, some comfortable hard soled shoes

I would still like to mount my phone however. Or is it some other gadget that serious bikers use? I always see them on the handle bars. I'd like to track my miles and avg speed if possible

No one addressed the water bottle mounts and/or how to make sure the bottles will fit. Are they sold together? I'll check out some of the stores recommended and see what I can find

Thanks again,
never had a problem with water bottles, the cage and bottles always seem to fit. a good accessory would be a padded ergonomic road seat, the hard bench racing seat doesn't cut it for me.
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Old 10-10-20, 01:31 PM
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Download free Strava on your phone. It will track what you want and more.
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Old 10-10-20, 01:34 PM
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Ass pads???
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Old 10-10-20, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Cacti View Post
Thank you everyone for the prompt and terrific responses!

I'm sold on the need for gloves, lube, and at least a padded liner. Also, some comfortable hard soled shoes

I would still like to mount my phone however. Or is it some other gadget that serious bikers use? I always see them on the handle bars. I'd like to track my miles and avg speed if possible

No one addressed the water bottle mounts and/or how to make sure the bottles will fit. Are they sold together? I'll check out some of the stores recommended and see what I can find

Thanks again,
For the riding you described you donít need water bottles.
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Old 10-10-20, 02:30 PM
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Good comments above,

Water bottles for cycling come in 20/24 & 32 oz. sizes, some are insulated. They fit about anybody's water bottle cage. I like the Profile plastic cage, they seem to hold bottles well on rough terrain and I like the Camelback 24oz insulated bottles (I find them on sale somewhere, else they are stupid expensive, as is most Camelback stuff), but really any cheap insulated bottle works for hot days.

I recommend the free version of RideWithGPS. You can install the app on a smartphone, it can be your activity tracker as well as generating navigable routes on-line, then follow on the phone. There's a ton of mounts for cell phones that fit on a handlebar. I don't think I'd do this if mt. biking difficult terrain, especially with an expensive smartphone. We could write a book on the pro's and cons of using a smartphone as the bike computer vs. a dedicated $300 Garmin, or not. Do a Google search, there's lot's on this subject.
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Old 10-10-20, 02:41 PM
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  • Helmet- I'm thinking that's a must.
I agree that it's a must, even if you're not going more than 15 MPH. Lots of people think you don't need one. Maybe they don't, but I feel safer with one. It certainly won't hurt to wear one so why not do it?

---
  • Gloves- Do I really need them?
They certainly help. A good set of gloves will not only help pad your hands so they don't get numb while riding on long rides, but if your hands get sweaty in the middle of summer gloves help you keep gripping the handlebars. I don't know if handlebar tape causes blisters, but gloves will prevent them. Plus, if you do take a spill, better to hit the ground with gloves on than without. Most people try to catch themselves with their hands, and gloves will help you not skin them up or make you have to pick gravel out of them later.


---
  • Cycling pants- I'm sure those of you who are serious riders are geared up for it. But I really don't want to look like Lance Armstrong. I hear it can get pretty uncomfortable if you don't have ass pads, but again. My rides will be short and on the flats. Do you guys recommend special pants?
I only wear cycling pants during colder weather, otherwise I wear shorts. Cycling pants and a good cycling jacket help me extend the riding season into fall & early spring.

---
  • Ditto for any special riding shirt
Usually I either wear a cycling jersey or else I wear a moisture-wicking polyester T-shirt in bright neon colors for visibility. I never wear a cotton T-shirt while riding in hot weather, you will regret it. They make you feel wet & miserable, while the moisture wicking material evaporates the sweat quicker and helps keep you dry.

---
  • Ditto for special shoes
I don't. I just wear standard tennis shoes or sneakers, but then I don't use clipless pedals, just flats.

---
  • Stand pump- I hear I'll need one and it makes sense to have one, so that's a must, right?
Or an air compressor works well, too, which is what I use. It's a small one so sometimes it works hard to get up to 100 PSI, but it keeps my bike tires inflated. On each of my bikes I carry a hand pump.

---
  • Patch kit- I'm not planning on blowing a tire, but who ever does? Not sure I'd even know how to replace or patch an innertube. And if it's recommended, do I need a special mount underneath my seat? Does it include a mini air pump?
If you're going more than a couple miles from home, a patch kit and spare tube are pretty much a must. You won't always get flat tires, but when you do you'll wish you had one. Best to learn how to fix a flat tire or replace a tube, I'm sure there are plenty of videos online to teach you how. Get an underseat bag and carry your spare tube & patch kit in it, and get a frame pump. This will keep you from walking or making the call of shame some day. Underseat bags usually don't need a special mount.

---
  • Rearview mirror- I'll probably want one (not sure it's needed). I've heard pros and cons to a helmet mirror or one attached to the handle bars. Any recommendations for the casual rider who will be riding mainly on bike/walking paths?
They are extremely handy. It's always good to know what kind of traffic is behind you, especially before making a left turn. Lots of people like helmet/glasses mounted mirrors (such as myself) and others like handlebar mirrors. You just need to figure out what will work best for you.

---
  • Water bottle mount- I'll definitely want this and someone recommended I get two for longer rides. They don't seem to come together, so how do I know the mount(s) I buy will fit the water bottles I'll buy?
They're fairly universal. Just about any bottle will fit in just about any bottle cage. Be sure to get insulated water bottles since they'll keep your water cold a lot longer.

---
  • Phone mount- I see bikes that have what looks to be a phone mounted on the handle bars. Not sure if it's a phone or something only fanatical cyclists use, but it would be cool to mount my phone to use My ride or GPS to track my distance
I've tried a handlebar phone mount before but it seemed like it kept getting weaker and wanted to drop my phone. I stopped using it and started using a top tube bag in which you mount your phone in the cover. The top has a clear plastic panel which you can see & operate your phone. I've found this to be a much better solution for my needs, and if I ever wreck I don't have to worry about my phone going flying off into a ditch or somewhere. Plus I can carry quite a bit in it, and I call it my "glove compartment."

---
  • Bell- I'm not much for talking and would much rather ring a bell than having to keep announcing "on your left" to joggers and walkers. That said, a bell seems kind of dorky to me. Could be my bias from only girls having them on their bikes when I was a kid
There are tons of cool bike bells available out there. You don't need the old school "ssshhing ssshhing" type bells. The Knog Oi bells look pretty neat, don't even look like a bell but they say they are not super loud. The bell I use is a cheap one I got from Amazon which gives a nice loud "ding ding" when you push the lever. And even though the bell was cheap, it is nice & loud.

---
  • Extra tubes- Whether I get a patch kit or not, it seems I'll want at least one spare inner tube to keep at home
You'll want to keep several because if you ride a lot, eventually you're going to ruin a tube. As I pointed out above you'll want to carry one with you when you ride.

---
  • Lube/grease- When I was a kid, my father used to oil up my chains and axles, etc. I assume it's still important to keep your chains smooth. What type of stuff do I need to get for this?
We could fill books with the debate over what kind of chain lube is the best. Anything from commercially available bike chain lube to wax to a thin layer of motor oil has been used. As long as your chain is properly lubed to keep the links from wearing and it's not collecting dirt, you should be good to go. But you will need to clean & relube your chain every so often. Just like owning a car, a bike requires regular maintenance.

---
  • Mask- Believe it or not, I've been seeing cyclists wearing mask during this pandemic. I wasn't planning to, but now that they're saying virus particles can hang in the air for hours, it would suck to get sick doing something I'm hoping will improve my health. Few people wear masks where I live and I don't want to be riding through everyone's vapor trail my whole ride. Any thoughts on wearing a mask while riding?
I don't wear a mask while riding, though I do use one when I'm out in public interacting with people. I think for the most part you will be OK without a mask especially if you're riding alone. But if it makes you feel better to wear one, then do it.

Last edited by Milton Keynes; 10-10-20 at 02:51 PM.
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Old 10-10-20, 02:47 PM
  #17  
Maelochs
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I recommend: a multi-tool or at least a reversible mini-screwdriver (flat and Phillips) or a pair of small screwdrivers and a few Allen wrnches (you can get a three-headed unit with the most popular sizes for a few dollars), three tire levers (some tires darer Tough to get off) a spare tube or two, maybe a glueless patch or two, a tire boot (the plasticized envelopes used by USPS are great, and a dollar bill works too in a pinch,) and a mini-pump. Practice changing tubes---you do Not want to be out in a bad situation and trying to learn, and you don’t want to be ten miles from home and puncture the new tube because you hadn’t mastered the techniques. Ten miles pushing a bike is a few hours of kicking yourself for not preparing.

An inexpensive floor pump is also a good investment. You can find them failry cheap on sale if you shop a while. I got one from Nashbar with a built-in pressure gauge which has served me well for years…. Under $20, as I recall.

I carry two tubes (sometimes you change a tube and find a piece of debris was hidden int e tire and escaped the first inspection, thus ruining the new tube) and I have a couple at home. I do my patching at home where I can do it right. Eventually you will get a flat in a place with no shoulder, or no light, or two-foot grass, or whatever and you will want to get going with maximum expediency. Learn to swap tubes, patch at home, IMO.

Most water bottles fit any bottle cage.

I don’t use a bell, and never have, and if more than 50 years have never got pulled over for it. Call out loudly if you need to alert peds/other cyclists. Your choice, though. As for as looking “dorky,” some folks don’t judge, some folks think anyone even riding a bike is a dork, some folks think anyone riding without a bell is a dork … most folks don’t think that much or that deeply about other people at all. If you think you will use a bell, get a bell.

Best to start with flat pedals and pretty much any shoes. A stiffer sole is helpful on longer rides, but I have ridden thousands of miles in cheap foam sandals, sneakers, or whatever shoes I wore at work. You can get decent pedals (good grip, lightweight, big platforms to spread the stress) for $20 or $30 if you shop around.

Once you go clipless, you are into thte big-buck realm. I have never found worthwhile shoes for under $40 even at ridiculous sale prices, and thoses can cost ten times that much. Clipless pedals star around the sdame price and can be a few hundred for the best ones … and you need to learnt eh twechniques to gain any benefit and not get hurt. For just taking joy-rides downt he local MUP, you are probably safer being able to put a foot dwon without thinking, and get 98 percent of the performance benefits.

You can mount your phone on your bike or put it in a pocket or in the seat bag. I like to track my rides with RideWithGPS. Also, I suppose if you wreck or something having the option of dialing 911 might be handy …. Never needed it, but I know people who have called for a ride, and I have gotten rides after bad wrecks. Your call.

I have a mirror on one bike, and sometimes use a helmet mirror. If you are riding bike paths it would probably not be needed. Do learn to look and make sure you actually Look---I have rushed a peek now and then and missed something and almost regretted it.

Gloves can offer protection from weather, road rash, and some vibration. I prefer to wear gloves. Don’t buy the expensive brand-name stuff---even the best gloves are pretty low-tech,. I always wait for sales and closeouts/discontinued models on cycling sites.

After years of riding in sweatpants or cargo shorts or athletic shorts or whatever I happened to be wearing, I have switched to padded cycling shorts and would never go back. You can wear them inside normal shorts or sweats if you don’t like the spandex look.

Jerseys are good because of the rear pockets, but $5 wicking T-shirts from Walmart work too. I actually sew pockets onto wicking T-shirts—a simple rectangle cut form an old t-shirt, sewn along three sides, because I want my wallet and stuff With me. If I crash and get carted off in an ambulance, some guy might toss my wrecked bike in a dumpster …. Along with all my ID, credit cards, cash, and housekeys.

As for lube …. Don’t tell anyone, but you can get a big bottle of some common light oil like TriFlo and get 98 percent of the performance of the big-money brands. Keep the chain clean, learn to lube it properly, and all the hype around “super-lubes” which cost mega-bucks will seem silly. Unless you need the extra two percent performance …. Save your money. You gain more by keeping the chain well-maintained than the super-lubes give you.

That said, I wax most of my chains.
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Old 10-10-20, 03:33 PM
  #18  
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Yes, you want a helmet. You should also wear eye protection.

You want to carry a patch kit or spare tube (ideally both) and a way to reinflate.

I typically only wear gloves during warm weather when I’m racing. When I do, I wear unpadded gloves.

I put my phone in my jersey pocket, and I have a cycling specific computer on my bars.

Yes, get some bottle cages. You can spend $5 or $75 but they all do the same thing.

I don’t use a mirror. I turn my head

There’s a million different lubes, and every rider has a favorite. The most important thing is to apply it regularly, wipe off the excess, ride, and repeat.

I use clipless pedals because it’s important to me to keep my feet reliably attached. This isn’t the case for everyone. Platforms and regular shoes work for lots of riders.

The more you ride, the more you might benefit from a jersey and shorts. You can just wear regular clothes if you like. I do for commutes, errands, and casual rides.
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Old 10-10-20, 05:04 PM
  #19  
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Here's the stuff I carry. Since tires naturally bleed some air, they need to be topped off periodically, and that gets old with a mini pump. So I keep a floor pump at home, it was 5 bucks at St. Vinnie's. But a decent quality pump is kind of an investment -- something that will serve you through multiple bikes, especially if your whole family gets into cycling. It's basically part of your house.

You can get lost reading chain lube threads, but suffice to say that I keep a bottle handy.

Lock. You can get lost reading lock threads. I use a piece of steel chain wrapped in old innertube with a relatively low security combination padlock.

Lights. I do ride at night.

Helmet. I wear one. I'm in a category where a helmet probably improves my odds.

I figure, everything else bike related can take time to figure out. There would me no point to me listing everything I've accumulated over the years. I wouldn't go out and blow my budget on every possible thing. Ride for a while and figure out what works for you.



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Old 10-10-20, 05:21 PM
  #20  
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Bring your brain on every ride. That is, be mindful of potential hazards and assume you are not seen by others. Also bring your voice and do not be afraid to yell at cars that might be distracted on phones or do not look both ways long enough to see you when turning.
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Old 10-10-20, 06:41 PM
  #21  
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I put a tube of chap stick, asprain, salt tablet and $10 bill in my under seat tool bag. I put two bandanas in one of the three pouches on the back of my jersey. You will have to blow your nose from time to time. Lights for after dark riding and a blinking red light facing the rear for daytime road riding.

If you try to save money by going cheap it will end up costing more. Not many on this forum including me ever want to be critical of inexpensive department store bikes, the so-called BSO (Bicycle Shaped Object) but today I was out on my local MUP which was jam packed with riders, walkers and adventure seekers of all ages and stopped to offer assistance to a disabled cyclists. He was riding a WalMart kind of Mongoose full suspension contraption and even on a flat as a pancake MUP he broke off the non-drive side crank arm. There is no trail side repair to limp home on that one.

If you don't want to wear a pair of spandex cycling shorts because you are worried that people will confuse you with Lance, then a simple solution is to put on a pair of those baggy kneel length sports shorts $10 at WalMart over the cycling shorts. In colder weather substitute the baggy shorts with $12 WalMart sweat pants.

When we were kids it was easy, our parents took us to Sears and we picked out a bike, then rode it all over. Thing is in reality "all over" was really just a mile or two not a 30 mile cruise into the hinterlands. As adults we want to get on the bike, pedal a while, arrive at the destination without any drama or unnecessary physical discomfort. Having said that if you push yourself you will experience discomfort but some of that is necessary. Clothing and the associated Bric-a-brac usually serves a purpose, a good purpose. You might not appreciate it a month from now but if you ride a lot you will get on board. Not saying buy the top shelf stuff but stay away from the bottom shelf.
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Old 10-11-20, 03:02 AM
  #22  
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Again, all very helpful responses. This a dumb noob question, but do I need a mount for the patch pouch that goes under the seat? Or does it come with some kind of straps? Same question about the mini pump. I assume I need a mount for that?

Also, no offense to Lance or anyone else who wears spandex. It's just for me. I think I'll go with biking shorts under regular shorts or my long workout pants
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Old 10-11-20, 03:28 AM
  #23  
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Most saddle bags come with straps or clips for mounting. Most mini-pumps come with mounts which attach under the water-bottle cage. I would not buy a pump that didn't come with a carrier.
@GREsp15 shows a picture of a mini-punp in post #19 . it looks like a Lezyne Sport-Drive HP with flex hose (based on what is written on mine.) (https://ride.lezyne.com/products/1-mp-spdhp-v1m04)

I have a lot of pumps---one per bike and couple rejects---and I can recommend this pump highly. It has a hose to attach it to the valve instead of just clipping on, which makes damaging the valve while pumping a lot less likely. I have no trouble getting very high pressure very quickly and without a lot of muscle. it comes with a mounting rack.

You can pick one up for about $20 plus shipping if you shop around.
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Old 10-11-20, 03:37 AM
  #24  
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As for saddle bags, I discount a lot of what I read in bike mags and websites---we all know that the mags write good reviews in order to get sponsored gear. However---The Best Bicycle Saddle Bags of 2019 [With Buying Guide ([url]https://toptenbestlists.com/best-bicycle-saddle-bags-review) has some ideas.

Again, I have many---one per bike plus some rejects---and can recommend the Topeak model they suggest. it comes with either strap mounts (which are sufficiently secure) or a very convenient clip-on quick-release mount.

I vastly prefer the quick-release version because I can swap one bag from bike to bike, and easily take the bag off if I park in a sketchy neighborhood and don't want to leave it.

Again, $20-$30 is all you should ever pay.

I have also bought and used some of the no-name or obscure/made in china stuff, and frankly, all of it did the job. The technology is so settled that Anyone can make a good saddle bag. I wouldn't buy a $5 bag, --I think the least I ever paid was $10 for a very small bag on sale a while ago---and I don't think I have ever paid more than $25---and that was because i wanted a specific bag, the Topeak, in x-large, with a clip, so I had a small (Summer) and extra-large (Winter) bag for my bikes.
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Old 10-11-20, 07:27 AM
  #25  
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What is your intent and vision for your bike?

In Dec. 2013, I found a bike in GW with intent of general use and exercise. Not much interest in accessirizing. By next summer I was ready to commute and have been doing so since. I also have little economy, so have been catching as catch can I want my old mtb to do everything.

From front to rear:
Small brake boss rack AND low rider racks.
Plastic half fenders.
Ergon GP2 grips.
AirZound horn.
Cygolite.Metro 360.
Old, used, Bontrager Trip 4w computer.
Salsa side load cage (fits 40 oz bottle).
Regular Topeak bottle cage.
Topeak medium saddle bag. (Outfitted for tube and minor repairs).
Aldi $7 airpump in baton pouch (strapped to seat tube on right side).
Med kit in old game bag (stuffed in front of rear fender).
Topeak mtx trunk bag on explorer rear rack.
Cygolite Hot Shot rear light.
Pair of Axiom Storm Front bags up front.
Pair of Blackburn cordura bags on back.
And just did a simple convert of a small golf novelty bag for the upper front rack.

On me:
POC mips helmet. Added face shield.
A collection of bike jerseys (short, long sleeve and jackets) and cycling shorts (all thrift finds) because they wick sweat well.
Temp bike leggings (sales & thrift).
Half and full finger gloves.
Fleece skull cap and neck fuller for winter.

Very necessary: Lights, helmet and gloves. Tire patching and pump (unless you don't mind walking).
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