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Not sure to keep my fx3

Old 11-10-20, 09:39 PM
  #1  
Awesomeguy
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Not sure to keep my fx3

Hello ,

im new to biking , other than when I was little kid, and just bought an fx3.
I ridden about 80 miles so far, but Iím trying to decide if I should get a domane endurance ride bike instead.
I currently do 8-10 miles per day , but I feel like I might do more (15-20) as I get more practice .

my issue is I only tried a high end domane due to bike shortage , albeit it was one size small, (56 instead of a 58) I enjoyed the hand position options and how it was neutral being in the hoods, but my worry is being hunched over might not be good for my neck and back in the long run , but on the fx3 I feel more pressure on my left hand for some reason otherwise is comfortable
should I keep the fx3 or exchange it for a domane?
I never had back injuries directly, just some issues from doing a sitting job in which I had a pinched nerve, not sure if it was back exactly but was ok after PT ,couple years ago, by doing press ups, I also had left frozen shoulder that lasted a year, which is ok now .
.
with that said please advise?

Last edited by Awesomeguy; 11-10-20 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 11-10-20, 09:44 PM
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Do what I did and buy a Domane but keep the FX3. Sometimes it’s fun to have choices.
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Old 11-10-20, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Mojo31 View Post
Do what I did and buy a Domane but keep the FX3. Sometimes itís fun to have choices.
how differenct is it riding a domane compared to fx3?
please describe the difference in feeling especially from back and neck perspective ?

itís really hard to tell since at bikes shops u can only really ride in the parking lot lol

Last edited by Awesomeguy; 11-10-20 at 09:52 PM.
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Old 11-10-20, 09:56 PM
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I don’t have a FX3, but have a Specialized Sirrus 4.0. Very comparable to the FX.

Domane position is a bit more stretched out, but not bad. Sirrus is a bit more upright. Domane is more compliant or vibration absorbing. It’s a bit faster ride, and more enjoyable on longer road rides. I like them both though, and switch between them.
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Old 11-10-20, 10:14 PM
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Youíd be surprised the similarities between both models. The FX series holds closely to the geometry and life style of the road bike but with the only difference being that it removes the drop bars. Most hybrid road bikes such as the Specialized Sirrus does that. Keeps the aggressive feel of the ride but keeps the rider more upright.

With that said, Trekís Domane I think understands that. Trek offers a lot of road bikes such as their Emonda and of course their ultimate Madone. Those two are downright racing machines that will leave your neck cramped for days if not use to it. However, the Domane does not. Itís an endurance bike. Intended for long rides in the saddle therefor geometry is moved around so youíre not leaned over so much. If anything, itís honestly a gravel bike. Itís clearance for wider tires, ISOspeed in front and rear and hefty carbon makes it an all practical machine for whatever you want.

Most shops offer a no questions asked return policy. Give it a go for a couple days!
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Old 11-11-20, 05:30 AM
  #6  
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A cheap and easy way to get more hand positions on your hybrid is to add bar extenders like these or these (there are many others out there.)

I did that on my old hybrid, was very useful for long rides to change hand positions or for going into headwinds where I wanted a bit more aero position.

I also had a road bike, having 2 bikes is great - I now have a Domane and love it, but if $$ are an issue, the bar extenders can help.
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Old 11-11-20, 05:37 AM
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What if you could only have one bike , whatís preferable?
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Old 11-11-20, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
What if you could only have one bike , whatís preferable?
The one that fits You best......
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Old 11-11-20, 06:34 AM
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This is just my opinion and it is not based on knowledge of the bikes in question nor am I an expert in proper riding position.

It this point the OP has 80 miles total riding miles, basically a beginner. The body is not used to riding a bike regardless of the riders position, so in my opinion the OP should expect to feel sore, discomfort, pains in various areas and so forth. There is a lot to consider, the age of the rider, the physical condition, on and on. Then there are the personal preferences and fitness goals. Finally there are the budget considerations. To ask complete strangers which bike to add to the collection or keep or get rid of is asking a lot. We have no idea just exactly how determined this individual is to achieve his goals.

The first time I rode 25 miles in a single ride I thought that I had arrived. And here I am, 2 years later riding 150 miles a week, 50-60 mile rides, and I still get sore. Granted the recovery time is far less than it was, but it takes time and effort to achieve a degree of fitness. I'm not yelling at the OP, rather it would be my suggestion that the goals are well defined and other details made known. Having said that the previously mentioned solution, having more than 1 bike, is a good solution. Variety is the spice of life.
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Old 11-11-20, 06:43 AM
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Depends on your riding. If I was 100% doing road local rides, I would choose the Domane, not even close..

But I do about 25% of my riding on gravel or dirt roads, crushed stone rail trails, the occasional path in the woods. Another 10% of so my riding is multi-day tours, where I want to carry stuff - not camping, so not crazy heavy, but still need convenient mounting, sturdier wheels, etc. I used to use my hybrid (plus bar extenders) for that mix, with some commuting in the road mileage.

But, doing week long tours convinced me years ago to add a Trek 520 for road riding and touring and have 2 bikes. The Domane essentially replaced the 520 and then I replaced the hybrid with a I Jamis Renegade that I use for non-paved road rides and the shorter, lighter touring I do these days - so I am still at 2 bikes, vs. N+1!

If I had to choose between the two for that mix, I'd use the Jamis - I actually ride it a good deal on pure pavement rides and it is slower and less fun to ride. But really not that bad - changing the 40MM gravel tires to 35 MM Schwalbe Marathons eliminates much (certainly not all!) of the difference.

Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
What if you could only have one bike , whatís preferable?
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Old 11-11-20, 07:18 AM
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So, just for some Info and back ground, I am 225 lb and 35 years old, and 6 ft.

i have average athleticism at this time
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Old 11-11-20, 07:22 AM
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The FX3 is a nice bike, and you say you're new to cycling, so you probably just need to make some adjustments. Getting the saddle adjusted correctly and the handlebars where they feel most comfortable may take several tries before they feel just right. If you decide to add bar ends as mentioned in post 6, be careful. I believe the bars have an insert in them and if I'm correct (think I am), you need to get Trek specific bar ends, or change the handlebar so you can use "standard" bar ends. If you decide to change the bar, you have lots of options for how much sweep and rise you might like, that's a whole 'nother thread!
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Old 11-11-20, 08:07 AM
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Ride the FX3 for a while more. Don't make a switch when you are unsure---unless you have some sort of trade-in option, but with however many miles on the FX already, I can't imagine you'd get much as a trade-in ...

Generally, with endurance-geometry drop-bar bikes, you can approximate the riding position of a hybrid like the FX by riding on the bar tops, and also have the rest of the bars to grab. You can raise or lower the bars, and swap the stem ($20-$30 for a good stem, and easy to swap) to get a comfortable combination of postures.

Ride any bike for long enough and it will hurt. But a lot of that is fitting and set-up, and the rest is fitness.

If you have the bars too low or too far away, you will hurt your neck and upper back between the shoulders. If your lower back and stomach are not strong enough, your lower back will hurt. if your legs aren't strong enough, you will press on the bars and hurt your hands, or sit on the saddle too hard and hurt your buttocks. If you get tired of holding yourself up with your legs and core, you will lock your arms and hurt your elbows.

This goes for All bikes. I did a ton of commuting on a rigid MTB (essentially a hybrid) and a lot on drop-bar bikes. Your will feel pain if you are not fit and properly fitted to your bike, and if you ride too far for you body you will feel pain. Flat bar or drop bar, makes no difference.

I prefer drop bars, nowadays. I have a couple bikes set up for comfort and one specifically to be a little racy but all have drop bars. I like the variety of positions. I can sit almost bolt upright and hold the bar tops if I choose ... and if I ride too far and my lower back starts protesting, that's what I do. Same riding position as a flat-bar bike would offer.

However .... you are at the very beginning of your riding journey. And, I don't know your final destination or destinations.

Generically,. I would suggest getting the Domane ... it is a very versatile road bike which can handle tires wide enough for some gravel or dirt, and can still work for quick group rides, should that ever become your thing.

However, I also believe in variety. If you like the FX, keep it. If you get the Domane eventually and find you only ride one bike ... sell the other, or keep it as a back-up. That way you can ride with a bike-less friend, or have a ride if the main bike is in the shop or something. Also, you could set up the FX with really wide tires and racks and use it for mild off-road and shopping/commuting/light touring.

Mostly, I'd say keep riding and keep looking at bikes and when you know what you want you will know. Then come here and tell us.
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Old 11-11-20, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
So, just for some Info and back ground, I am 225 lb and 35 years old, and 6 ft.

i have average athleticism at this time
If you decide to get a Domane, make sure you try it on before buying. The Trek site fitting calculator told me that at 6' with a 32-33 inseam, the 58cm would be the bike for me. Tried it and found that I could barely reach the pedals or tops of the hoods, even with the saddle at its lowest position. 56cm is perfect. My Sirrus on the other hand is a 58cm and fits me perfectly.

If I had to give up the Sirrus 4.0 or the Domane SL5 today (and if money were not the issue), I would give up the Sirrus as the Domane is a better bike in a number of ways. But, the Domane was also more than twice the cost of the Sirrus. If they were priced equally, it would come down to which riding position I would want long term.
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Old 11-11-20, 09:14 AM
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One other note on fit - if you are looking at the Domane AL, it uses a different seat tube/post than the mast on the SL and SLR. It could allow the saddle to sit lower which could make the 58cm a good fit and result in a different fit than the SL/SLR.
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Old 11-11-20, 04:51 PM
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I would say you dont have enough time on your FX yet, but also, do you know if you have any issues with carpal tunnel? I discovered after getting hand buzzing and numbing that was the issue. I also had an accident a few years ago and had 5 operations on my shoulder, it took me a long time to get my arm and shoulder set to be able to ride comfortably.

As far as the FX, I had a Trek 7300, precursor to the FX series, and I had over 8K miles on that even after I got my road bikes. I used it as a commuter, just a beater bike for the weather, etc. I ended up selling it to a kid who had some issues and needed some transportation to school. Another question, have you had your current bike fit for you?

I recently got a Domane, love it, but, I found that I needed a size smaller that what I normally ride due to the geometry. I normally ride a 54, but the 52 fit me better.
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Old 11-11-20, 06:46 PM
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So many people I've known have started riding and soon after "upgraded" to a much nicer bike, only to find out a short time later that cycling wasn't for them. Their bikes became a place to hang clothes on in their bedrooms. If you are looking to improve, you will not get it with buying a better bike. You will get improvement by riding whatever you've got more.

If you want and can afford a Domane, by all means get it. I've got a 7.3 FX and Domane SL6-very different bikes. I can average 4 to 5 miles an hour more on the Domane. I love both bikes, and all the other bikes I've got too. That's part of why I've kept riding. I've got a lot of bikes to make my rides different experiences. The upright riding position of the FX is a welcome relief sometimes, but the drop bar Domane is great to ride too. If you have neck/back issues, the FX will be better, but the Domane is fun to ride. You want something you are gonna be comfortable on so you will ride. Good luck finding a Domane, or anything else for that matter right now.
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Old 11-11-20, 07:05 PM
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I put over 400 miles on a bike that I really didn't like, so I could learn what I did like. I took a Trek Marlin and converted it to something very similar to an FX. Try as I might, I never was able to turn it into a "good" road bike. Despite that, I took it on many 30 mile rides. I then purchased a bike with an endurance geometry (Fuji Gran Fondo) and was just shocked with how comfortable the bike is and how it just eats miles. My Marlin (aka FrankenMarlin) is a great gravel bike and I really enjoy it on rail-to-trail MUPs. I would not be comfortable putting my Gran Fondo on gravel. My point is that there isn't much overlap between the bikes and I'm glad to have both. If you don't ride gravel...then get a proper road bike. The FX is a fitness bike that is meant for road & gravel...but it doesn't do both great.
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Old 11-11-20, 09:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
What if you could only have one bike , whatís preferable?
I don't understand what you are saying?

On a serious note if I had to only have one single bike and I wasn't locked up in a mental institution for losing my absolute goddamn mind for such batpoop crazy thoughts, I would probably own a custom built bike out of titanium or steel. It would need to be as versatile as possible and made specifically to fit me by someone who knows what they are doing, with some seriously bling components that will work well and last. I would not be anything off the shelf for sure and would not be a cheap bike in the least.

If I were in your position I would just have two bikes, trust me you will want at least N+1 where N is the number of bikes you currently have.
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Old 11-11-20, 10:01 PM
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While both are excellent bikes, I have neither so I can't speak exactly on the topic, however I have a Marlin that's (usually) hybridized, as well as a road bike.

For a long while my road bike was my only ride (after another hybridized mountain bike was stolen) and I liked it well enough, I used it for longish commutes (15 mi each way) but it really was probably just a bit much bike for me.

While I now ride my road bike a couple thousand miles a year, I also spend a bit of time on my hybridish bike towing kids, riding with friends and family etc.

The upright seating on the hybrid seems somewhat less offensive to other casual riders just going out for a ride, it tackles a lot, and is still generally fast.

If I were in your position, I would keep the FX and ride the snot out of it, I wouldn't hesitate to take something like it out for 40-60 mile rides on pavement, limestone or even a little bit of gravel. If longer rides start becoming more regular or you find yourself itching to get in on faster group rides, the Domane looks like a great, versatile bike. As suggested above, maybe you could have both. Having a second decent bike around is a great way to get someone into cycling as well, or rides with family and guests etc.
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Old 11-12-20, 05:07 AM
  #21  
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Yes, so after your guys feedback, and thinking things over, I think I will keep the fx3
Ive read reviews where people prefer riding their fx compared their domane for comfort reasons , so to each their own, and each bike has its own issues. Seems like road bike is better in the hands for multiple positions but little more taxing on the back and neck and sight seeing, while hybrid is more hard on the hands for longer rides.

my rides are under an hour (less than 10-15 miles), if I start approaching 1.5-2 hours casually I will see how it feels doing 25-30 miles, and rethink. But my passion is at not at that level yet, usually Iím just going for cardio and outdoor activity .

generally I do feel great on the bike and switching to another bike I might have other issues.., granted my store has 30 day return policy, it is a headache to go through the hassle if uncertain .
also finding a bike right now is hard due to pandemic and canít try much , I think for a road bike itís more important to try various sizes and bikes since geometry becomes more important.

my bike is a size large, so itís definitly right size for me since Iím 6ft, the medium is for someone under 5Ē8.

Now my next thread is going to be about what clothes to get for the winter riding

thank you for your feedback!

Last edited by Awesomeguy; 11-12-20 at 05:21 AM.
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Old 11-12-20, 05:46 AM
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The issue is that you are out of shape. At 35 being sore after 8 - 10 miles has nothing to do with the bike.

No bike will help this situation. Eat better, lift weights, run and bike more.

Case closed
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Old 11-12-20, 08:18 AM
  #23  
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don't get rid of it. Put fenders on it and use it as a rain bike. Then add another bike of your choosing
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Old 11-12-20, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
Yes, so after your guys feedback, and thinking things over, I think I will keep the fx3
Ive read reviews where people prefer riding their fx compared their domane for comfort reasons , so to each their own, and each bike has its own issues. Seems like road bike is better in the hands for multiple positions but little more taxing on the back and neck and sight seeing, while hybrid is more hard on the hands for longer rides.

my rides are under an hour (less than 10-15 miles), if I start approaching 1.5-2 hours casually I will see how it feels doing 25-30 miles, and rethink. But my passion is at not at that level yet, usually Iím just going for cardio and outdoor activity .

generally I do feel great on the bike and switching to another bike I might have other issues.., granted my store has 30 day return policy, it is a headache to go through the hassle if uncertain .
also finding a bike right now is hard due to pandemic and canít try much , I think for a road bike itís more important to try various sizes and bikes since geometry becomes more important.

my bike is a size large, so itís definitly right size for me since Iím 6ft, the medium is for someone under 5Ē8.

Now my next thread is going to be about what clothes to get for the winter riding

thank you for your feedback!
That's not a bad call. I find my Sirrus is a good bike for 10-15 mile rides, both exercise and casual. I use it a lot for after work rides where that is about all I can get in due to time.

I got the Domane because I wanted to do much longer fast rides on weekends. I find it great for that.
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Old 11-12-20, 02:29 PM
  #25  
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In 2014 I bought Trek Neko SL (they call them DS now) and last December I bought 2020 Trek Domane SL5. On a good weather I ride exclusively Domane, this bike made me fall in love with riding again. Iíve never ridden so many kilometers in one season. Itís fast, comfortable and puts smile on my face. However, my Trek hybrid is a very good autumn/spring bike and although itís not as enjoyable as Domane I still like it too much to sell it.
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