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Is my saddle height too low?

Old 11-21-20, 06:41 AM
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Awesomeguy
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Is my saddle height too low?

So I had originally used the heel method and was noticing way too much weight on my hand , so I starting searching online and really liked the 109 method , where you take your inseam multipliy by 1.09, and that is the distance your saddle should be from peddle spindle when peddle is at ~5:30 positioned aligned with your seat post and seat tube and crank

i Noticed immediate difference , and felt better , for my hands and I did move back the saddle couple mm back of center so it was more comfortable for my knees.
Also I did not slide from the saddle as much .

My knee discomfort is better and almost gone that I get post rides momentarily , my hands feel better. Also when I ride out of the saddle my feet seem positioned better and my bottom stays in the saddle better.
Iím using flat peddles and I notice when I now rise to rise out of the saddle my feet at much better aligned .

NOW, thatís all good, But only thing is I noticed I feel it more in my quads than before, when riding at a decent gear nothing extreme ,could just be in my mind since Might be same when I was using the heel method
Is this normal, and to be expected in biking or should soreness be everywhere ?
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Old 11-21-20, 07:05 AM
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Ride it for awhile. If you used a legitimate fit method and something doesn't immediately hurt while riding, you need some time in the saddle. Your muscles are accustomed to whatever it was you were doing before cycling. They may react differently to your new activity.
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Old 11-21-20, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Ride it for awhile. If you used a legitimate fit method and something doesn't immediately hurt while riding, you need some time in the saddle. Your muscles are accustomed to whatever it was you were doing before cycling. They may react differently to your new activity.
I guess the better question is , is having more quad soreness more than other other parts of the leg if any, normal in cycling ?

is having soreness ONLY in the quads and nowhere else albeit very little , normal?
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Old 11-21-20, 07:54 AM
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When I restart riding after time off (injury, illness, schedule) or when I decide to take my performance up a notch (faster than walking) I notice it in my quads mostly. Lower back after much longer rides.

When I decide to push on hills, i feel it mostly in the upper outside quad muscle. My calves feel it also because I try to spin more, which uses my feet, but it is the quads where the soreness is worst.

Because ... those are the right muscles to use for most cycling. If your saddle was too high and too far forward ... well the triathletes often position the saddle so they use the hamstrings more, so they can save their quads for the run, where they tend to win or lose the event. Possibly you were not engaging the quads sufficiently, not getting the best use of the hamstrings with the too-tall seat.

Sounds like you have everything right, now. Just keep paying attention. I know as my fitness changes (more or fewer miles) I sometimes need to make micro-adjustments as my capacities change.
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Old 11-21-20, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Awesomeguy View Post
So I had originally used the heel method and was noticing way too much weight on my hand , so I starting searching online and really liked the 109 method , where you take your inseam multipliy by 1.09, and that is the distance your saddle should be from peddle spindle when peddle is at ~5:30 positioned aligned with your seat post and seat tube and crank

i Noticed immediate difference , and felt better , for my hands and I did move back the saddle couple mm back of center so it was more comfortable for my knees.
Also I did not slide from the saddle as much .

My knee discomfort is better and almost gone that I get post rides momentarily , my hands feel better. Also when I ride out of the saddle my feet seem positioned better and my bottom stays in the saddle better.
Iím using flat peddles and I notice when I now rise to rise out of the saddle my feet at much better aligned .

NOW, thatís all good, But only thing is I noticed I feel it more in my quads than before, when riding at a decent gear nothing extreme ,could just be in my mind since Might be same when I was using the heel method
Is this normal, and to be expected in biking or should soreness be everywhere ?
The 109% method was always good. Based on British experiments in the 1960s. I have been at this so long I remember when the results were reported as news.

First, you did it right. Too many times someone hears about this and measures to BB instead of pedal at bottom. Of course that gives a ridiculous high saddle. Then same someone talks about it a lot and the 109 gets discredited.

The original study was done using huge increments. Canít remember everything, it was something like they had riders try it at 100%, 105%, 109%, 113%. Of the few choices 109 was the clear winner. So you are allowed to fine tune at your own discretion. Also bear in mind that measuring leg length is never completely exact.

Sounds like you are either very close or maybe you are done. If you like the result, thatís it, you are done. If it were me I would try putting the seat up a little, down a little. Certainly canít tell from here if the first trial would be up or down, that is up to you.
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Old 11-21-20, 05:17 PM
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Fine tune at your own discretion is probably the best advice. It could be that what feels great one day may be uncomfortable another. I once read that Eddy Merckx adjusted his seat height so often that he carried a spare seat post binder bolt because they would fatigue.
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Old 11-22-20, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Pratt View Post
Fine tune at your own discretion is probably the best advice. It could be that what feels great one day may be uncomfortable another. I once read that Eddy Merckx adjusted his seat height so often that he carried a spare seat post binder bolt because they would fatigue.
That was the old Campagnolo binder bolt that was brittle and fragile. Merckx adjusted frequently because of his unresolved hip injury. Up and down all the time. He also changed saddle angle and even fore and aft while riding. Lots of us took the Campy saddle wrench on rides and tried to replicate this. It was all about comfort, fine tuning never slowed him down.
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Old 11-22-20, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
That was the old Campagnolo binder bolt that was brittle and fragile.
I broke one half way through a 45 mile ride. Rode about 5 miles out of the saddle to a hardware store. The owner hooked me up with a nut and bolt so I could get home.
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Old 11-22-20, 07:20 PM
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Seat bolts break because they BEND. It stresses one side of the bolt. Not so with collars.
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