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What Sort of Gearing Works Best for your Needs?

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What Sort of Gearing Works Best for your Needs?

Old 11-30-20, 06:57 AM
  #101  
63rickert
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
You are quite confused. Hydrolysis of ATP is just as much the energy source for type I fibers as it is for type II. If all ATP in a fiber were fully hydrolyzed, that fiber couldn't contract regardless of type.
Not confused at all. Fast twitch is a limited source of energy. The fast twitch tank empties quick.

You want to think the two types are more or less the same. They are not. Again, there is a reason we call them two and not one.
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Old 11-30-20, 07:11 AM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Right, different types of excersise will place emphasis on the two different types of muscle fibres. But both are involved.

Lately I've been focusing on a higher cadence, mainly due to wind everywhere I ride. So I'm sticking with the 40t chainring.

Im focusing on a cadence of around 75-80, which i take is still relatively low.

I'll try doing a 200m sprint and see how long it takes me just for fun 63rickert is it done on pavement? Or can I do it on a gravel 400m track?

I dont see much point in doing so, because the point of cycling is long distance endurance. But I do find myself using short bursts of energy often to keep up in traffic and what not.

Will have toget a video of me pedalling for you guys sometime soon.
Gravel is various. It depends. If we are talking about a normal running track it should make little difference if you have appropriate tires. There could be some slippage on acceleration, you will know if that happens.

Some here might remember the hillclimb course at Slatyfork. At top of main climb is a level ‘road’ which is rock outcropping and gravel. I did that at a steady 32mph, which would equate to about 14 seconds per 200 meters. Can’t even guess how long that section is, I was redlined, but longer than a sprint.

Long distance endurance is not the point of cycling. It is one thing you can do on a bike. Many things can be done on a bike.
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Old 11-30-20, 12:10 PM
  #103  
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I set my bike up for loaded alpine touring 40 years ago. The same gearing was fine for hilly commuting, and now, on near-flatland, I still use bottom and top gears once a year on a windy day.
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Old 11-30-20, 12:30 PM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Right, different types of excersise will place emphasis on the two different types of muscle fibres. But both are involved.

Lately I've been focusing on a higher cadence, mainly due to wind everywhere I ride. So I'm sticking with the 40t chainring.

Im focusing on a cadence of around 75-80, which i take is still relatively low.

I'll try doing a 200m sprint and see how long it takes me just for fun 63rickert is it done on pavement? Or can I do it on a gravel 400m track?

I dont see much point in doing so, because the point of cycling is long distance endurance. But I do find myself using short bursts of energy often to keep up in traffic and what not.

Will have toget a video of me pedalling for you guys sometime soon.
In track cycling, 4km is considered an endurance event.

And back when I was a Cat 5, I did plenty of 30 minute crit races. I don't think we covered "long distances."
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Old 11-30-20, 01:15 PM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
...... the point of cycling is long distance endurance.
The point of cycling is riding a bicycle.
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Old 11-30-20, 01:57 PM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
1. What sort of terrain do you ride on?
2. What sort of bike is it?
3. How hilly is the area you ride in
4. Whats your current ratio spread and how does it suit your needs?
5. How would you change it?
Road:
  1. mostly mountains w climbs ranging from 10min - 1.5 hr
  2. Specialized SWorks Tarmac
  3. Almost entirely up or down
  4. 52/36 - 10/32 12sp Campy Super Record
    1. only get into the 36-32 combo when the gradient is above 12% or so
  5. Feel like the spread between chainrings is big enough that there's little overlap on where I ride the chain on the cogs. If I'm on some terrain where I'm right in that overlap, I end up shifting the chainring back and forth a bit

Mtn
  1. entirely mountains
  2. Intense Tracer T275c
  3. Either up or down, w long (1-2.5hr climbs)
  4. 34 - 10/52 SRAM Eagle XX1
  5. only get into the 34 - 52 on the super steeps, like 18% +. I used to ride the same hills w a 34-42 combo, but I prefer a high cadence while climbing. The 52 doesn't work well for me on technical sections, as the amount of forward movement you get from half a pedal stroke is almost nothing, so I might have put a gear between the 52 and the next one down which is a 42

Last edited by stuff shredman; 11-30-20 at 03:14 PM. Reason: reformatting
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Old 11-30-20, 02:12 PM
  #107  
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I'm old-school. My regular road bike is 11-speed. I run a 53/39T crankset with a 12/25T cassette in order to have a straight block that jumps only one tooth from cog to cog (12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19-21-23-25), in order to have the best fine-tuning for the cadence I want. My cruising speed is between 30 and 40 km/h. For example a cruising speed of 33 km/h at 90 RPM requires a 53/18 combination. And the only way to have an 18 is with the 12/25 cassette.
Longer hill near my home is a 3-km @ 8% which is totally fine on 39/25. Most hils are short, steep pitches.
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Old 11-30-20, 02:58 PM
  #108  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Thought this might make for some interesting conversation.. lets say you can spec your bike with any sort of ratios you want. What are you picking?

1. What sort of terrain do you ride on?
2. What sort of bike is it?
3. How hilly is the area you ride in
4. Whats your current ratio spread and how does it suit your needs?
5. How would you change it?
.
1. Rolling hills and flats paved MUP and local paved streets
2 hybrid style Specialized Turbo Vado 4 SL e-bike
3. Frequent shallow grade hills
4. Stock 48t front, 11/42 Cassette
5. not sure of specific changes, but would like less low end and another high end gear as I never use the lowest speed and occasionally run out at the high end. Sometimes the shift to 5he highest gear is more of a jump - not as smooth as the other gear changes.
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Old 11-30-20, 03:08 PM
  #109  
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1. Paved
2. Carbon road bike
3. All hills (big ups, big downs, little flat)
4. 50/34, 11-28
5. I would keep the chainrings the same, but a closely spaced cassette with an extra bailout gear would be perfect (like a 14-30)
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Old 11-30-20, 06:36 PM
  #110  
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Pavement. Road bikes, last two are flat bar road bikes.

53/39 11-25 10spd
53/39 12-26 10 spd
52/36 12-25 11 spd
52/36 12-25 11 spd
52/36 12-25 11 spd
50/34 12-27 10 spd
50/34 12-25 11 spd

52/36 12-25 11 spd
50/24 12-25 10 spd

Not hard to find hills here but they aren't long climbs. If I'm not the first one up the hill, I'm pissed. And I like a narrow gear range.
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Old 11-30-20, 07:02 PM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
The point of cycling is riding a bicycle.
Thank you.

For me, the point of cycling (minus the fitness and commuting aspect) is maintaining a steady average cadence, whatever the terrain or your pace of choice may be. That could still use up your fast twitch fibres.

Doesn't change the fact that everybodys muscle structure is dispositioned with a different level of muscle fibres, and will choose to pedal at different cadences as such.
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Old 11-30-20, 07:04 PM
  #112  
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Anyone like having such a close ratio spacing on their road bike?

Literally 1 tooth count difference per cog. Its insane. Im sure it makes sense if you dont live in a hilly area though.

40t/34t being the lowest gear for me comes in super handy on a tough climb. I wouldn't want to have less gearing than that for hills.

How is it to have super close ratio spacing with 8,9,10,11 gears? I don't think that will work for everybody.
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Old 11-30-20, 09:20 PM
  #113  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
+1. My latest (cargo) bike adds a 22T to the front of that!! Nothing it can't climb, and it keeps up with the Hipsters (I'm 61) on the level. My road bike has 50/39 x 11-28 but I rarely take it to the big ring. I'm about to preach the gospel of the granny gear and warn those who will hear, about the evils of overgeared production roadbikes. They are a great evil loosed upon the land. Resist them with all thine resistance. When you are old enough to find the "Over Fifty" forum interesting you will see the sad, sad, testimonies of those who were rocking the 88" fixed gears in their mis-spent youth but now have no knee cartilage. A word to the wise is sufficient.
73 Myself and still push most hills in the large (53 or 50 depending upon the bike) chainring to keep the racing muscles. No knee problems in the 45 years I've competed. Also keeps you on the rivet.
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Old 12-01-20, 06:27 AM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by sewupnut View Post
73 Myself and still push most hills in the large (53 or 50 depending upon the bike) chainring to keep the racing muscles. No knee problems in the 45 years I've competed. Also keeps you on the rivet.
Using which gear in the rear? Must not be a very steep hill
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Old 12-01-20, 11:39 AM
  #115  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Anyone like having such a close ratio spacing on their road bike? Literally 1 tooth count difference per cog.
I haven't seen a real corn cob cassette in a long time. Does anyone make an 11-21 11-spd or 12-21 10-spd cassette?
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Old 12-01-20, 11:45 AM
  #116  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
I haven't seen a real corn cob cassette in a long time. Does anyone make an 11-21 11-spd or 12-21 10-spd cassette?
I've seen a 13/19t 7 speed by suntour on ebay. Not sure how useful that would be.
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Old 12-01-20, 11:52 AM
  #117  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
I've seen a 13/19t 7 speed by suntour on ebay. Not sure how useful that would be.
7-spd is more than 30 years old. It's not very relevant for a present-day discussion of gear spacing.
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Old 12-01-20, 11:55 AM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
7-spd is more than 30 years old. It's not very relevant for a present-day discussion of gear spacing.
I wouldn't say its irrelevant either.

Its a good amount of spacing for the vast majority of riding needs.
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Old 12-01-20, 12:04 PM
  #119  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Using which gear in the rear? Must not be a very steep hill
Still able to get up Lookout Mountain with no less than 53x23, a 60 mile out and back from my house. Entire 5 miles is 5% average with some 7- 8 % switchbacks. A lot more fun than weigh training.
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Old 12-01-20, 05:37 PM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Thought this might make for some interesting conversation.. lets say you can spec your bike with any sort of ratios you want. What are you picking?

1. What sort of terrain do you ride on?
2. What sort of bike is it?
3. How hilly is the area you ride in
4. Whats your current ratio spread and how does it suit your needs?
5. How would you change it?

- Mostly pavement, some gravel and dirt paths
- Road bike
- Mostly flat, some long hills, nothing crazy steep
- 40/52t front, 14-34t rear (2x5)
- 36/52t, 11-34t (2x8)

While my current gearing is totally sufficient for my needs and actually quite useful, I find myself being in top gear (52/14) all the time on flat terrain in non windy conditions. I'd like for slightly lower and slightly higher gearing on both ends of the spectrum. Something like 2x7 or 2x8 would offer some ideal spacing in terms of snatching through the gears while accelerating from a stand still.

Interestingly enough, I found a Biopace Mountain LX crankset made by shimano (28/38/48) . Never seen that sort of spacing before. Typically lower end mountain bikes come with 22/32/44. Woukd be interesting to give this unique ratio spread a try.
Wow. A 34! That's pretty hard to find outside of a touring bike. I agree a 14 just doesn't do it. A change to a 13 doesn't seem like much but it does make a big difference. I typically run a 23 or 24 up front and get by with a 32 in back on my loaded touring bikes. I'm happy enough with a 48/13 on the high end. With the right tires you should be able to climb telephone poles with a 22/34. People with zip by you when walking though. I hate it when that happens! 🙄
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Old 12-01-20, 05:59 PM
  #121  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Right , OK, will see how the bike feels after I switch out the left crank arm.

I feel quite efficient on this bike. There really is practically no bouncing, especially compared to other bikes I have been riding.
I don't get the bouncing. Maybe tighten up the sprung seatpost? I use a sprung seatpost on my favorite touring bike but it doesn't flex unless I hit a bump. I liked a oval ring on the granny for awhile particularly when I hit really steep hills with all my gear. It seemed to hurry me through the non-power part of the stroke. Sprint training got me to 200 rpm and allowed me to dust some of the competition at the line 40 years ago. Now I couldn't get far without getting out of the saddle from time to time just to keep a reasonable cadence on the 42/23 low on my racing bike. I probably should go looking for a 13-26 freewheel. Yeah, I said freewheel.🤓
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Old 12-01-20, 10:14 PM
  #122  
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All my cassettes and cranks are stock.
Th Specialized is 52/36 with 11-30 I've climbed some longer passes and hills on it. Cayuse Pass and Sunrise Road.
The LeMond is 52/42/30 with 12-25 Same as above and also Doi Suthep in Thailand. Haven't tried Doi Inthanon yet. This bike lives in Thailand now.
The Fuji is 52/36 with 11-28 Haven't climbed any big or major hills. Mostly short steep hills.

I really like the 11-30 setup. So far I have been able to climb just about anything. If I were to switch out a cassette I would go with a 11-34. Ya know, just in case!
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Old 12-03-20, 11:49 AM
  #123  
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Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Wow. A 34! That's pretty hard to find outside of a touring bike. I agree a 14 just doesn't do it. A change to a 13 doesn't seem like much but it does make a big difference. I typically run a 23 or 24 up front and get by with a 32 in back on my loaded touring bikes. I'm happy enough with a 48/13 on the high end. With the right tires you should be able to climb telephone poles with a 22/34. People with zip by you when walking though. I hate it when that happens! 🙄
Its classified as a "sport touring" bike... Im quite thankful for the 34 gear.

I dont see anything wrong with the 14 gears. It works when you have this many teeth in the front chainring.. not only is the spacing in the freewheel improved, which helps for a smoother transition between ratios, but 14 is a more useful gear than 11 for the majority of average circumstances.
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Old 12-03-20, 08:44 PM
  #124  
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Does anyone here use those clip in pedals?

I've gradually increased my cycling cadence to around 84 RPM now. Changing the left crank arm back to 170 also seemed to help.

being able to lift one pedal up with your foot while pushing down with the other works noticeably more effective in a lower gear at a higher pedalling cadence. The Biopace crank seems a tiny bit pulsey with these clip in pedals though. I think it felt a bit better with round chainrings. I will maybe try to re orient the chainrings and see how that feels.

now I'm spinning faster at a lower gear and it feels great. I am curious to see how the gearing will change with larger crankarms.
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Old 12-03-20, 08:46 PM
  #125  
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With the clip in pedals I notice the biopace cranks are particularly demanding with nailing your power stroke correctly and not overshoting the 6 o clock position.

I did try these pedals very briefly on a bike equipped with round chainrings and I think it felt a bit more natural.
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