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Tire pressure for MTB 29 , 2.25

Old 12-09-20, 03:14 PM
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neeraj66
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Tire pressure for MTB 29 , 2.25

Hi,
On my MTB, I have wtb Ranger tires, 29, 2.25.
Tire says pressure range, 35-55 psi.
What is the ideal psi for riding it on road and trails ?

Currently i am using 40,40 for both tires. Please suggest.
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Old 12-09-20, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by neeraj66 View Post
Hi,
On my MTB, I have wtb Ranger tires, 29, 2.25.
Tire says pressure range, 35-55 psi.
What is the ideal psi for riding it on road and trails ?

Currently i am using 40,40 for both tires. Please suggest.
Sounds too high, IMO. I'd start with 20 psi front, 25 psi rear with those size tires and I weigh 230 lbs. It depends on your weight, riding style, tire make, etc. For me it's a trial and error process, and given my experiences and weight, 20 - 25 would be my starting point.

You can go to youtube and search for "mountain bike tire pressure" to get more tips.
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Old 12-09-20, 04:40 PM
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https://axs.sram.com/guides/tire/pressure

https://www.schwalbe.com/en/pressureprof
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Old 12-09-20, 04:43 PM
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Or this, https://info.silca.cc/silca-professi...ure-calculator
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Old 12-09-20, 05:02 PM
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I don't know why manufactures bother with pressure recommendations like that. If you're riding trails, 40 is waaaay too high unless you're quite heavy. I'd think something in the 20s would be appropriate for most riders. You will feel benefits of lower pressure of you're set up tubeless.
for reference, I'm 160 pounds and using 29x2.3 tires (tubeless, naturally) on rocky terrain. Usually 20psi front and 24 or so rear, and mine are on the high side.
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Old 12-09-20, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by neeraj66 View Post
Hi,
On my MTB, I have wtb Ranger tires, 29, 2.25.
Tire says pressure range, 35-55 psi.
What is the ideal psi for riding it on road and trails ?

Currently i am using 40,40 for both tires. Please suggest.
Only because it hasn't been said yet; the pressures you use for 'roads' are likely going to be higher than the pressures you use for 'trails'.

I'll elaborate. I consider roads to either be concrete, asphalt, or well packed crushed limestone you'll find on some MUPs. They're generally smooth. The idea of a higher tire pressure is to minimize the tire's rolling resistance, or the amount the tire deforms before rotating over the surface. On trails, rough gravel, and very poor roads, a lower pressure makes for a more comfortable faster ride than with higher pressure, because the obstacles on the trail can't deflect the tire as much when the tire is absorbing some of the deflection. For this reason, you'll likely have a pressure for cruising on pavement and smooth trails, while using a lower pressure for XC, dirt, gravel, etc.

I wouldn't go as low as tyrion suggested, but I'm using 26" clinchers. Tubeless setups can allow you to go lower because you don't have the risk of 'snakebite' punctures on obstacles. I find 42/45 sufficient for smooth rolling on pavement, and 33/35 has plenty of grip and float off road. Lots of guides recommend trial and error for off road pressures, dropping pressure until you can achieve the balance of suspension and grip you're looking for.
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Old 12-11-20, 05:30 PM
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Thanks for suggestions.
I had some idea about tire pressures and to keep it low on trails than on the road but was getting confused as the manufacturer mentioned on tire, do not ride out of the recommended range on tire.
which is on the higher side. 35-55.
Thats why i was keeping it around 40 on road.
But didn't knw whats best on trails. I guess in the range of 35/38 shud b good on trails. Will try it out.
I am 175 pounds. 5'11
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Old 12-11-20, 06:52 PM
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With tubes I used to run 35 psi on 26" wheels, with 2.1 tires. That was likely too high. On a 29" wheel with tubeless I run 22 F - 25 R. I'm 230 lbs.
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Old 12-12-20, 05:58 AM
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Are you running tubes or tubeless? And did I miss How much road vs trail riding your doing? Also, are your riding hard pack dirt trails or technical trails? All this factors will make a difference. I currently ride at 22 front/ 25 rear on my full suspension bike, thatís with a 2.4 front tire and 2.3 rear. If I was running a 2.25 all around and running tubes I might bump it up.

perhaps a good option for your mixed riding is to bring a small hand pump and adjust pressures to the trail your on.
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Old 12-12-20, 09:13 AM
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I am running tubes. Bike is hardtail. Trails mostly on hard surfaces, but planning to go for more dirt trails nxt yr.
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Old 12-14-20, 07:04 AM
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Originally Posted by neeraj66 View Post
I am running tubes. Bike is hardtail. Trails mostly on hard surfaces, but planning to go for more dirt trails nxt yr.

if itís mostly hard trails I would keep running 40 at this time to reduce friction. You might bump them down to 32-35 on the trails for added traction. Just watch out for pinch flats.
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Old 12-14-20, 09:54 AM
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Riding on roads and riding on trails are two different things. That's why there are so many different kinds of bikes and bike tires. "Trails" isn't really a very descriptive term either. There is a world of difference between a crushed limestone rail-trail conversion and hilly single track.

To me, part of the fun is figuring out for myself what the best combination of tires and air pressure is for wherever I happen to be riding. Technical single track = the lowest air pressure you can manage without getting repeated pinch flats. On paved roads, knobby tires need relatively high air pressure or they "squirm" and feel unsettling every time that you make a turn.
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Old 12-14-20, 01:45 PM
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I am the same weight as you.

2.25Ē tires with tubes, on dirt I would try around 26 front, 30 rear. And then gradually lower until younger a pinch flat, then go up 2psi and call it good.

if you canít deal with fixing. Flat to know how low you can go, then stick with 26/30.

For just pavement, iíd go 5-10 psi higher.

Last edited by Kapusta; 12-14-20 at 01:54 PM.
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Old 12-14-20, 04:14 PM
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If I really like riding at say 25 psi but I got the occasional pinch flat I wouldn't raise the pressure to avoid those flats. I'm not going to ruin my ride quality and sacrifice traction to avoid something that might happen once or twice a year. If I rode where it's really rocky and pinch flats are a constant problem I'd go to bigger tires and/or tubeless. It's part of the game. You either have hard tires, ****ty ride quality, and not as much traction... or you have what you like. Flats happen, accept it and enjoy riding.
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