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Looking for advice for a Mid late 90s classic or 80s bike

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Looking for advice for a Mid late 90s classic or 80s bike

Old 02-16-21, 10:59 AM
  #76  
rekmeyata
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Originally Posted by DocJames View Post
Hadn't heard of this model, went and looked it up. My goodness! What a sweet looking ride. I love the classic lines with modern componentry. Sadly it's totally out of stock and sold out everywhere. But man, that's a lot of bike for $799. I'm seriously considering getting on their wait list.
Almost all bikes are out of stock except for real high-end stuff and real low-end stuff you would find at Walmart. Not sure when supplies will be coming back in, once the covid thing settles down I would think production would start to ramp up, my only fear is that when it does ramp up will there be an initial slam into the market place of bikes made half-ass just to rush them to market? I think it might be wise to be on the waiting list that's for sure.

There is another all steel bike including the fork, and it has Shimano 105 transmission, but it too is out of stock, but you can be put on a waiting list, see: https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...emio_elite.htm

I think the Motobecane would probably be the better deal, maybe someone else can check them out and let us know if that's the case just to verify. The Motobecane would be mail order only, and Bikes Direct can be sort of weird to deal with after you get your bike. If you go the Motobecane route I would take it to a bike shop and have them assemble it and go over it with a fine-tooth comb to make sure everything is properly lubed, like the headset and bottom bracket have adequate lube, etc, it might cost you $150 or so to have a shop do that but in the long run it would be worth it. I've heard of reports where the factory didn't lube stuff properly, or a chain-link was stiff jammed up and tore the derailleur apart, sure they replaced the parts but you still had to pay for someone else to install the parts. That kind of bad stuff that happened wasn't exclusively happening to the Motobecane, but over all the models of bikes they sell. You can read about a review that was done here:
https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear...-elite-review/
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Old 02-16-21, 11:03 AM
  #77  
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yes thats the problem

Two local bike shops cant even let me take anything as everything highend they have is already presold.

Hard to get parts in.

Ergo why facebook and craigslist ads are 30% more over priced for used.
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Old 02-16-21, 11:28 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
Almost all bikes are out of stock except for real high-end stuff and real low-end stuff you would find at Walmart. Not sure when supplies will be coming back in, once the covid thing settles down I would think production would start to ramp up, my only fear is that when it does ramp up will there be an initial slam into the market place of bikes made half-ass just to rush them to market? I think it might be wise to be on the waiting list that's for sure.
And this is the reason I've pretty much resigned myself to planning on making various upgrades and improvements to my small fleet of mostly older bikes -- some steel, some aluminum.

My main issues is I'm planning on gradually ramping up to doing progressively longer tours. I'm a big dude, 6'4", 260, and naturally most of my rides, save for my single speed and my mountain bikes, just don't have the clearance to put on the width of tire I should be using for that sorta stuff.

Seriously considering putting non knobbies and a trekking bar on one of the mountain bikes and trying that out for some of the trips. But I think I might do the C & O on my single.
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Old 02-16-21, 06:27 PM
  #79  
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If you search around on here, you’ll find far more posts, and even whole threads, about how many Tange, Ishiwata, Tru Temper, and Reynolds tunes frames are nearly as or as good as most Columbus tubes frames.

Lots of love for the Centurions with butted Tange tubes, in particular the “Iron Man” models.

I haven’t seen these before and wonder if they’re a Canadian Market Iron Man...

https://vancouver.craigslist.org/pml/bik/d/maple-ridge-centurion-time-machine/7258447563.html

^this guy’s less motivated to sell but also more informative than this guy ¥


https://abbotsford.craigslist.org/bik/d/abbotsford-southeast-centurion-12-speed/7265269546.html

The price to pay for most Columbus tubed complete bikes tends to hover around here...


https://vancouver.craigslist.org/pml...255982700.html

If you bought this^ and a Miyata 912 in near enough of the same Stack & Reach measurements and took those wheels and handlebars and swapped them back and forth between the two framesets a few times, I doubt your hands, butt, and feet could tell the difference.
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Old 02-16-21, 09:17 PM
  #80  
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You forgot Fuji VaLite quad butted tubing
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Old 02-21-21, 10:26 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by DocJames View Post
And this is the reason I've pretty much resigned myself to planning on making various upgrades and improvements to my small fleet of mostly older bikes -- some steel, some aluminum.

My main issues is I'm planning on gradually ramping up to doing progressively longer tours. I'm a big dude, 6'4", 260, and naturally most of my rides, save for my single speed and my mountain bikes, just don't have the clearance to put on the width of tire I should be using for that sorta stuff.

Seriously considering putting non knobbies and a trekking bar on one of the mountain bikes and trying that out for some of the trips. But I think I might do the C & O on my single.
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Old 02-21-21, 10:55 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by DocJames View Post
And this is the reason I've pretty much resigned myself to planning on making various upgrades and improvements to my small fleet of mostly older bikes -- some steel, some aluminum.


My main issues is I'm planning on gradually ramping up to doing progressively longer tours. I'm a big dude, 6'4", 260, and naturally most of my rides, save for my single speed and my mountain bikes, just don't have the clearance to put on the width of tire I should be using for that sorta stuff.


Seriously considering putting non knobbies and a trekking bar on one of the mountain bikes and trying that out for some of the trips. But I think I might do the C & O on my single.

I'm 6'5" at 260 lbs and ride older steel 10 speed bicycles from the 1970's and 80's. I have found that lower line bicycles usually were made for allowing fender installation. This means that there is plenty of room for bigger tires without the fender. I also downsize from the 27" wheels to 700c and these two changes allows me to run 32mm to 40mm tires depending on the make and model. As an example I have a 1980 Nishiki Sebring in a 68cm size frame. The original wheels were 27" but I run 700c now. The bike was a lower line bicycle and could run fenders. I now run 32mm tires on it and probably could fit 35mm if I wanted. The main triangle was straight chrome moly tubing and the rear and front forks were made of hi tensile strength steel, not chrome moly. This means the bike is heavier than a double butted chrome moly tube frame with same front and rear forks. I'm not racing so this does not bother me. I was looking for bigger tire clearances in a rideable, cheap, older steel bike. That bike is pictured above and is a pleasure to ride.

Last edited by tallbikeman; 02-21-21 at 10:57 PM. Reason: adding picture and text
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Old 03-01-21, 07:58 PM
  #83  
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Just wanted to thank you all for helping. Ive been riding the 2014 Masi and its quick. I am averaging a good 24 KM/h which is about 22km/h more than my old 1982 Raleigh.

I do want a classic bike to add, and the group inspired me to maybe fix up my Lotus too.

If anyone is here around Vancouver - Coquitlam. etc and knows a good Bike Mechanic, Can you email me. longhitv@gmail.com

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Old 03-13-21, 06:57 PM
  #84  
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Question on geometry

Should I head to my local bike place to see if I am sitting where I should, saddle adjustment and such



Ive been using Strava, just to calculate speed.
Im 6'3
230 lbs, trying to get back to 210.

On the 20km rides (thats what im doing about 20k) flat, no hills, Im averaging about 24 25 km/h with a top speed about 34 km/h.

This morning 3 guys zipped by my going like 35kmh and when I caught them 10 minutes later at coffee, they were all like 180lbs in weight. I guess I have 50 lbs on them and that is a lot. But Im wondering if maybe my bars are too low or my seat pitch is off.

Either way and thoughts????

I have regular pedals. I dont want clip in. I could buy baskets.
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Old 03-13-21, 11:15 PM
  #85  
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[QUOTE=longhitv;21966067I guess I have 50 lbs on them and that is a lot. But Im wondering if maybe my bars are too low or my seat pitch is off.

Either way and thoughts????

I have regular pedals. I dont want clip in. I could buy baskets.[/QUOTE]

First things first. The guys you guessed to be 180 could have been even lighter. Many speedy cyclists are. I'm 6'4", currently 249, down from a high of 295. I assure you, 50 pounds is HIGHLY significant in the effect it was on speed all things being equal.

As far as fit, seat angle, handlebars etc, are you feeling uncomfortably contorted, painful lower back, too much pressure in the harms and hands or excessive discomfort in the saddle? If not, then adjustments might not be your primary deficiency here. Low bars don't make you slower if you're leaned into a tuck using them. On the contrary, they make you faster -- much faster.

Keep in mind the single biggest denier of speed on a bike a drag. The larger your frontal area (i.e. more upright you are) the harder it's going to be to go faster. This is an exteme oversimplification, but the principle holds true.

My prescription after ensuring proper fit is to focus on getting to your ideal weight for your body type, work on drills like hill repeats, sprints etc to build more power. Maybe even some weight training like squats to get some more muscle in your legs. Other than that, miles, miles, and more miles. Speed takes time and continous effort and practice.

Hope that helps

Doc James
(Disclaimer, I'm employed by a local bike shop)
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Old 03-13-21, 11:18 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by longhitv View Post
Should I head to my local bike place to see if I am sitting where I should, saddle adjustment and such
You could. But the fit that most bike shops give when they sell a bike isn't really anything that you can't do yourself.

What have you done so far to fit the bike to yourself?

I have regular pedals. I dont want clip in. I could buy baskets.
What's your criteria? Why are you open to baskets but don't want clip-in?
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Old 03-13-21, 11:39 PM
  #87  
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Clip ins

What's your criteria? Why are you open to baskets but don't want clip-in?[/QUOTE]


The only issue with clip in, is the city I am in, bike lanes are very tight if at all and traffic doesn't love cyclists. I only try and pick light traffic days and just feel that clip ins could present an issue and Im not experienced enough as a cyclist
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Old 03-14-21, 01:11 AM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by longhitv View Post
The only issue with clip in, is the city I am in, bike lanes are very tight if at all and traffic doesn't love cyclists. I only try and pick light traffic days and just feel that clip ins could present an issue and Im not experienced enough as a cyclist


I have clipless (aka clip-in) pedals on my all of my bikes and like them. That said, don't get hung up on clipless pedals. They have their advantages and also their disadvantages. I don't believe for the average recreational rider they provide a huge, night and day difference in efficiency. I like them because I like my foot attached to the pedal. But I'd also say that, even the treaded, walkable shoes that are used with smaller mountain bike type pedals aren't the best to walk in. And there's the chance of not getting out of the pedal and falling down when you stop and want to get a foot down. I think that if you have a good flat pedal that grips your shoe with pins, you will be fine. BMX and a lot of mountain bikers use them very happily. As for the quality of those pedals, everything from $25 to $300 is available, so it's not like you're being thrifty (unless you want to!)

PS: that's a real nice looking bike.
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Old 03-14-21, 01:18 AM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
I don't believe for the average recreational rider they provide a huge, night and day difference in efficiency.
This much has been proven in multiple tests and observations. Clipless are great, I like them. Across my current 8 bikes some have them some don't. But we're talking about gaining maybe a few seconds using them. Despite common perceptions among many, they really don't make you go all that faster at all.

I highly doubt the reason OP got smoked by those riders was because of style of pedals.
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Old 03-14-21, 08:29 AM
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Pace line time vs. Solo?
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Old 03-14-21, 10:53 AM
  #91  
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I think the term you're looking for is 'toe clips', not 'baskets'.
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Old 03-14-21, 11:18 AM
  #92  
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Toe Clips. Yes

Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
I think the term you're looking for is 'toe clips', not 'baskets'.
Yes Toe Clips.
I am the original Poster and thread starter

Im going to see at the store if they can adjust how Im sitting.
Maybe im off..

And Im a big guy so those three guys were light weights And yes drafting played a big role I can imagine.

Last edited by longhitv; 03-14-21 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 03-14-21, 11:35 AM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by longhitv View Post
Should I head to my local bike place to see if I am sitting where I should, saddle adjustment and such



Ive been using Strava, just to calculate speed.
Im 6'3
230 lbs, trying to get back to 210.

On the 20km rides (thats what im doing about 20k) flat, no hills, Im averaging about 24 25 km/h with a top speed about 34 km/h.

This morning 3 guys zipped by my going like 35kmh and when I caught them 10 minutes later at coffee, they were all like 180lbs in weight. I guess I have 50 lbs on them and that is a lot. But Im wondering if maybe my bars are too low or my seat pitch is off.

Either way and thoughts????

I have regular pedals. I dont want clip in. I could buy baskets.
Having toe clips or clipless pedals will improve your speed. Right now you are pushing down with one leg at a time, but with clipless you are also pulling up with the other leg. Personally though IMHO avg 24km/h for 20k is really respectable. The weight difference will slow you down but not as much as you think. You will find that difference here is training. The other guys have probably been training for a while and having a buddy that's faster then you will speed you up.
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Old 03-14-21, 12:07 PM
  #94  
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Toe clips

Originally Posted by cbrstar View Post
Personally though IMHO avg 24km/h for 20k is really respectable.
Thanks. It is KM not miles, But my top speed pushing according to Strava is around 34 35 km/h
I still have an extra gear, to go into. The goal is 40km/h top speed on a flat.
If I can push that with that $800 mrsp (usd) masi Im pretty damn happy.

The big thing is the 500 calories I burn !!!

Last edited by longhitv; 03-14-21 at 12:21 PM.
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Old 03-14-21, 12:56 PM
  #95  
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Originally Posted by longhitv View Post
Should I head to my local bike place to see if I am sitting where I should, saddle adjustment and such



Ive been using Strava, just to calculate speed.
Im 6'3
230 lbs, trying to get back to 210.

On the 20km rides (thats what im doing about 20k) flat, no hills, Im averaging about 24 25 km/h with a top speed about 34 km/h.

This morning 3 guys zipped by my going like 35kmh and when I caught them 10 minutes later at coffee, they were all like 180lbs in weight. I guess I have 50 lbs on them and that is a lot. But Im wondering if maybe my bars are too low or my seat pitch is off.

Either way and thoughts????

I have regular pedals. I dont want clip in. I could buy baskets.
Your saddle looks relatively level and the bars don't look extremely high or low.
If you have pain somewhere, then perhaps your fit needs to change.
If you just want to be faster, then ride more. That builds muscle, drops weight, and you can work on speed specific drills while riding if you really want to geek out.

It doesn't make sense to mess with fit if you don't hurt.

If you are averaging 15.5mph solo each ride right now, you are doing fine.
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Old 03-14-21, 01:45 PM
  #96  
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Originally Posted by longhitv View Post
Thanks. It is KM not miles, But my top speed pushing according to Strava is around 34 35 km/h

I still have an extra gear, to go into. The goal is 40km/h top speed on a flat.

If I can push that with that $800 mrsp (usd) masi Im pretty damn happy.


The big thing is the 500 calories I burn !!!

There's different types of cyclists though. When I was a teenager me and my friend raced BMX, and we could easily out sprint a roadie...For a few blocks / or about 10 mins then we would get passed as we burned out. We were essentially great sprinters but lousy long distance riders. When I got my road bike learning to keep a high avg speed over a long distance was a different set of skills. You need to learn to be more aero, and you have to watch your diet. You also need to increase your lactate threshold by doing interval training. I've never used stradia but having a decent cycling computer that measures cadence and heart rate is good for this. I think some of the better ones like the Garmin 520 has programmable interval workout plans.
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Old 03-15-21, 10:40 AM
  #97  
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Originally Posted by cbrstar View Post
Having toe clips or clipless pedals will improve your speed. Right now you are pushing down with one leg at a time, but with clipless you are also pulling up with the other leg. Personally though IMHO avg 24km/h for 20k is really respectable. The weight difference will slow you down but not as much as you think. You will find that difference here is training. The other guys have probably been training for a while and having a buddy that's faster then you will speed you up.

Scientific study has been done on this very topic. Is being tied to your pedals so you can pull up, stabilize your foot, stop unwanted movement of your feet on the pedals better than just plain old platform style pedals. The short answer is that having clipless pedals and shoes and proper training to use them produces no more power than just mashing on some platform pedals with a couple of exceptions. There is a great video of two European pros testing this with power meters on the same super bikes but just changing the pedals. The only time the clipless beat the unclipped was on rapid accelerations and sprints and stand up pedaling. Their video has them riding uphill side by side, one bike clipless the other platform, at a steady power output. They then summarize the power meter results and different issues associated with this topic. I guess this can be an argument point amongst bicyclists but the science does not back up the clipless as being a better generator of power than non clipless pedals with exceptions. There are other reasons for clipless pedals that have to do with keeping your feet on the pedals and in a proper pedaling position while riding.. This video gives a good overview of the subject: Clipless Pedals Vs Flat Pedals - Which Is Faster? | GCN Does Science.
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Old 03-15-21, 11:01 AM
  #98  
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Originally Posted by tallbikeman View Post
Scientific study has been done on this very topic. Is being tied to your pedals so you can pull up, stabilize your foot, stop unwanted movement of your feet on the pedals better than just plain old platform style pedals. The short answer is that having clipless pedals and shoes and proper training to use them produces no more power than just mashing on some platform pedals with a couple of exceptions. There is a great video of two European pros testing this with power meters on the same super bikes but just changing the pedals. The only time the clipless beat the unclipped was on rapid accelerations and sprints and stand up pedaling. Their video has them riding uphill side by side, one bike clipless the other platform, at a steady power output. They then summarize the power meter results and different issues associated with this topic. I guess this can be an argument point amongst bicyclists but the science does not back up the clipless as being a better generator of power than non clipless pedals with exceptions. There are other reasons for clipless pedals that have to do with keeping your feet on the pedals and in a proper pedaling position while riding.. This video gives a good overview of the subject: Clipless Pedals Vs Flat Pedals - Which Is Faster? | GCN Does Science.

Do you mean this video?
On the sprint the one guy saw a 15% savings and the other a 30%. On the hill climb they saw marginal gains but they mention slipping off the flats. As a guy who likes to race BMX I can tell you one of the hardest changes for me to accept was the change from flats to clipless in BMX racing. But I can see why some might opt for flats as they have come a long way from what they were in the 80's/90's. You might not put more power on the ground but using clipless does distribute the workload across a broader range of muscles.
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Old 03-15-21, 12:25 PM
  #99  
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As was noted at beginning of the video these two gentlemen alluded to a study done at a university lab, maybe in Switzerland, on this subject in which it was noted there is no power output difference between the two styles of pedals. There may be power differences in sprinting and stand up pedaling. However both of these gentlemen admitted to not being very familiar with pedaling flat out on non clipless pedals. I road raced in the 1970's and used toe clips and straps to hold my cleated shoes on. But I also raced off road in the 1980's without toe clips and straps. I loved racing with and without toe clips. Later I bought SPD's but have found I much more enjoy riding platform pedals even on my fast bikes. I don't race anymore and that probably has something to do with it.
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Old 03-15-21, 02:45 PM
  #100  
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This!!!!
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
your saddle looks relatively level and the bars don't look extremely high or low.
If you have pain somewhere, then perhaps your fit needs to change.
If you just want to be faster, then ride more. That builds muscle, drops weight, and you can work on speed specific drills while riding if you really want to geek out.

It doesn't make sense to mess with fit if you don't hurt.

If you are averaging 15.5mph solo each ride right now, you are doing fine.
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