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Now's your chance to make a difference in the world & help this fat Dude find a bike

Old 03-29-21, 08:41 AM
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PoorFatBiker
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Now's your chance to make a difference in the world & help this fat Dude find a bike

Hi guys,
My first ever post on a Forum (thank you thank you)

I'm looking for a bike and the struggle is real. I'm 6 foot / 6 foot 1, 350 pounds.

I'm struggling trying to find a good bike (schwinn bonafind, merax....) or should I just buy a regular bike and get some heavy duty wheels and tires ?

I'm stuck and any help would be greatly apreciated, im in canada so preferably canadian dollars if you have any reccomendations.

Thanks a bunch in advance,
Cheers!
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Old 03-29-21, 09:21 AM
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You don't have classified ads in your area? Find a 1980s/90s steel rigid forked MTB. 26" wheels with 36 spokes. Your frame size will be 20 or 21" (in MTB parlance). There were plenty of brands with this product in that time period. 3 x 7 speed will be the gear set, with twist grip shifters, or if you're lucky, trigger shifters. V-brakes, but sometimes cantilevers. This bike is your ticket. When you find it, come back, and we'll help you fix it to your tastes.
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Old 03-29-21, 09:32 AM
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PoorFatBiker
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Phil_gretz Thank you so much for the time you took to reply ! really appreciate it. Let the hunting begin...
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Old 03-29-21, 09:36 AM
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Everything Phil said but I might add not to rule out disk brakes and 3x8 drive train. Stay away from suspension bikes. Good luck,
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Old 03-29-21, 12:13 PM
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You can post links (once you have 10 posts) to this board and we can give you our opinion as well.

Where are you located? Some of us like to search and make recommendations.
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Old 03-29-21, 12:57 PM
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You don't mention what part of Canada you are in, but if it is the part that is in "The Great White North" (AL, SK, MB, etc.) you might want to consider getting a fat tire bike that can be ridden year round, even when there is snow on the ground. I found mine to be a blast down here in tropical, sunny, warm Fargo North Dakota...

If you are over on the left coast, then that older mountain bike sounds like a good idea.
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Old 03-29-21, 01:12 PM
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Your other option is a steel touring bike with 36 spoke wheelsets. Fuji, Surly and Trek are examples of manufacturers that have produced steel LHT bikes for decades and would have gearing to carry weight.

You may want to check this thread on occasion:
eBay / CraigsList finds - "Are you looking for one of these!?" Part II

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Old 03-29-21, 01:37 PM
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If you go searching for a used bike, enlist the help of someone who is already an avid cyclist to help you sort out the trash from the treasures. There is a lot of overpriced crap on CL in my location. Most of the decent ones are $$$.

The fact that you even considered the Schwinn Bonafide tells me that you aren't familiar with what to look for. That bike comes in just one frame size. If someone offered to sell you clothing in "one size fits all" how good do you think it would fit you at 6'1" and 350 pounds? The other thing that screams out to me is the cheap front suspension on that bike. Stick with a bike that has a solid front fork and NO suspension. I'd rather see the manufacturer use better components on the rest of the bike than sell one with nearly worthless suspension. It's a sales gimmick.

If there is a bike club in your area, contact them and ask if there is anyone willing to help you make a good choice.
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Old 03-29-21, 03:58 PM
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Lots of good advice here. PoorFatBiker might also be interested in this subforum. ("Clydesdale" is a larger than-average cyclist.)
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Old 03-29-21, 08:34 PM
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Originally Posted by PoorFatBiker View Post
Hi guys,
My first ever post on a Forum (thank you thank you)

I'm looking for a bike and the struggle is real. I'm 6 foot / 6 foot 1, 350 pounds.

I'm struggling trying to find a good bike (schwinn bonafind, merax....) or should I just buy a regular bike and get some heavy duty wheels and tires ?

I'm stuck and any help would be greatly apreciated, im in canada so preferably canadian dollars if you have any reccomendations.

Thanks a bunch in advance,
Cheers!
Lennard Zinn understands big and tall folks being a tall folk himself. He built these as a cheaper alternative to his custom stuff. They aren't cheap bikes like Schwinn but are of quality and will last a long long long long long time.
https://bikeclydesdale.com

Unfortunately the bikes you listed wouldn't work well for your height and wouldn't last long for anyone but especially someone with some weight on them. Never heard of Bonafind but the other two brands are pretty low on the quality scale.

If you are looking to go cheaper find a larger sized bike and get someone to build some custom wheels for them for your weight and what you are doing with it. Try and find a touring bike or similar that can handle lots of weight.
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Old 03-29-21, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by DangerousDanR View Post
You don't mention what part of Canada you are in, but if it is the part that is in "The Great White North" (AL, SK, MB, etc.) you might want to consider getting a fat tire bike that can be ridden year round, even when there is snow on the ground. I found mine to be a blast down here in tropical, sunny, warm Fargo North Dakota...
If you are over on the left coast, then that older mountain bike sounds like a good idea.
Hey, I'm over here on the left hand coast and I still found the semi-fat 3" tires to be a good bike with zero suspension. I carried a 60# pack on my back along with a 20" Stihl, panniers front and rear with survival gear, radio equipment as well as wilderness first aid kit when doing search and rescue. We had Motobecanes with hyd disk brakes and they rode beautiful both up and down the mountains and they weren't very expensive.
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Old 03-29-21, 08:57 PM
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You are in Canada like me so I will suggest a local store selling the Opus bike brand. This brand is quite popular here north of the border and has a style for just about every rider. But at 350 pounds you may break a spoke or two during use, does not matter which brand they all have similar issues with heavier riders.
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Old 03-29-21, 09:54 PM
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Hi and welcome! As was mentioned, you may want to check out the Clydesdales/Athenas sub-forum for those of us over 200lbs. There are also several of us have lost or are in the process of losing weight, if you're interested in discussing that. I'll also answer questions if I can.

If it helps, in May, 2018 I weighed 440lbs. I'm currently at 212lbs (6'2" man). If you have any questions about the process let me know.

As for bikes at your weight and height, I'll defer to others. I waited until I was under 250lbs to finally buy a bike. Before that I spent quite a bit of time on an exercise bike (mostly at a gym, pre-pandemic) and a lot of hiking/walking.
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Old 03-29-21, 10:23 PM
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There are people making electric bicycles using motor bike wheels. I think it would be a good business if someone made a pedal version. These would be good for heavy people, cargo bikes, and those who wanted to ride in really rough conditions.
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Old 03-30-21, 02:48 AM
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Originally Posted by PoorFatBiker View Post
I'm looking for a bike and the struggle is real. I'm 6 foot / 6 foot 1, 350 pounds.
As said before, jump in the Clyde subforum. But alas, welcome to BFn.

I am close to your size and can echo what some have said...you might want to consider getting a steel mountain bike frame and building that up. My bike shop built this out of parts they had around the shop that probably wouldn't have gotten sold otherwise.



They started with a simple formula:
-steel MTB frame
-cruiser handlebar
-26x2.1 tires
-1x10 drivetrain
-mechanical disc brakes

I added:
-Brooks B17 saddle
-handlebar riser
-ESI Chunky handlebar grips

It has logged around 3100 miles and only left me high and dry twice.
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Old 03-30-21, 02:07 PM
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Just throwing this out there. I'm not sure of the brand but a gentleman in my town who was 350-400 pounds bought a electric bike. Just getting his body moving everyday with the help of the electric bike he dropped over 100lbs and some say 150lbs over the course of the riding season. The bike looked a little bit like a motorcycle to be honest and it had some beefy fat tires on it. If you can afford it I think it's something to consider.
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Old 03-30-21, 08:29 PM
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You guys are great ! I'm in Montreal Canada (east coast).
i started looking and found a lot of 1990s MTB on facebook marketplace.
Ranging from 150 to 250$ which I think is very reasonable. I'm going to try to make post post so I can share links and pictures.

I'm really happy with everyones feedback especially the tip of "staying away fro suspensions" since it's a sales gimmick. It's tough because I find those big suspensions so beautiful.

Another off the rack bike was the "Mongoose Malus" 7 speed fat bike any thoughts on that? (Alot of videos about up grades to it to make it better)

I was hoping to put under 1000$ on this bike and mainly use it in National parks here to lose weight and get my heart rate up.

thanks again guys really appreciate everyones help!
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Old 03-30-21, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
You can post links (once you have 10 posts) to this board and we can give you our opinion as well.

Where are you located? Some of us like to search and make recommendations.
I'm in Montreal, quebec Canada.

I don't mind if I need to drivtoup to 150 km away to pick up a bike.
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Old 03-30-21, 11:28 PM
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Originally Posted by PoorFatBiker View Post
I'm in Montreal, quebec Canada.

I don't mind if I need to drivtoup to 150 km away to pick up a bike.
Welcome, and since others mentioned the Clydesdales section of the forum, I don't have a lot to contribute. I will recommend finding a bike with a high spoke count, 32 or 36 spokes. I run 36 spoke wheels. I would also suggest a steel framed bike, and the suggestion of an older mountain bike is a good one if you are looking used. I ride a Surly Long Haul Trucker touring bike. It would be a great option if you are buying new, as are the other touring bikes mentioned.

Best of luck and whatever you find, enjoy riding!
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Old 03-31-21, 12:40 AM
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I think full suspension is good for heavy riders. You break less wheels. You just need a suspension you can adjust to take your weight.
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Old 03-31-21, 12:43 AM
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Unless you go for something heavy duty, I have found my fat bike to be stronger than regular mountain bikes. I am amazed I have not broken a wheel. I am heavy, and ride rough tracks.
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Old 03-31-21, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
Unless you go for something heavy duty, I have found my fat bike to be stronger than regular mountain bikes. I am amazed I have not broken a wheel. I am heavy, and ride rough tracks.
what fat bike are you riding and how much do you weight?
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Old 03-31-21, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by PoorFatBiker View Post
what fat bike are you riding and how much do you weight?
My bike is an X-treme 26x4.0 fat bike. It has 36 spoke wheels. I believe it was manufactured in Taiwan. I bought it in S E Asia. It has a steel frame. I cannot find pictures of this model on the internet. A lot of X-treme bikes on the internet are electric. I don't know if it is available in Canada. Just look for a decent steel framed fat bike.

Last year I weighed 130 kg (287 lb). I am now down to 111kg (245 lb). When I have time, I may start a topic on how I lose weight. I ride on a lot of very rough tracks, so my bike gets much rougher treatment than those who ride on smooth surfaces. I have broken the rear axle in the back wheel on this bike, but not spokes. I have broken spokes in other bikes.

I am the same height as you. Be aware that a regular sized mountain bike or fat bike is too small. I have raised the handlebars. I also have a long seat post and a large seat. A regular seat is just too uncomfortable for me.

If you will only ever ride on hard surfaces, a regular mountain bike may be ideal (particularly if you get one with heavy duty wheels). For mud, sand and snow, the fat bike leaves the others behind.

I also buy things based on value for money. If you come across a good fat bike at a good price, buy it. If you come across a good mountain bike at a good price buy it.

Others have said don't get suspension. I like suspension, but you need suspension that can be adjusted up to take your weight.

If you find that you break spokes, I suggest looking for stronger spokes to replace each one when it breaks. I like to learn and do this type of thing myself. If you break a spoke and don't replace it, the wheel becomes weaker, and it is not long before another one breaks, then another, and the wheel becomes unusable.

If you read some of my other posts, you may realize I often do things differently. I have mentioned using motorbike mirrors on my bicycle, and motorbike tubes, and these are only the things I have had time to write about. In the future, I am thinking of experimenting with motorbike spokes in bicycle wheels. I have not done this yet. It is just an idea I have been thinking about.

Last edited by alo; 03-31-21 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 03-31-21, 08:50 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
My bike is an X-treme 26x4.0 fat bike. It has 36 spoke wheels. I believe it was manufactured in Taiwan. I bought it in S E Asia. It has a steel frame. I cannot find pictures of this model on the internet. A lot of X-treme bikes on the internet are electric. I don't know if it is available in Canada. Just look for a decent steel framed fat bike.

Last year I weighed 130 kg (287 lb). I am now down to 111kg (245 lb). When I have time, I may start a topic on how I lose weight. I ride on a lot of very rough tracks, so my bike gets much rougher treatment than those who ride on smooth surfaces. I have broken the rear axle in the back wheel on this bike, but not spokes. I have broken spokes in other bikes.

I am the same height as you. Be aware that a regular sized mountain bike or fat bike is too small. I have raised the handlebars. I also have a long seat post and a large seat. A regular seat is just too uncomfortable for me.

If you will only ever ride on hard surfaces, a regular mountain bike may be ideal (particularly if you get one with heavy duty wheels). For mud, sand and snow, the fat bike leaves the others behind.

I also buy things based on value for money. If you come across a good fat bike at a good price, buy it. If you come across a good mountain bike at a good price buy it.

Others have said don't get suspension. I like suspension, but you need suspension that can be adjusted up to take your weight.

If you find that you break spokes, I suggest looking for stronger spokes to replace each one when it breaks. I like to learn and do this type of thing myself. If you break a spoke and don't replace it, the wheel becomes weaker, and it is not long before another one breaks, then another, and the wheel becomes unusable.

If you read some of my other posts, you may realize I often do things differently. I have mentioned using motorbike mirrors on my bicycle, and motorbike tubes, and these are only the things I have had time to write about. In the future, I am thinking of experimenting with motorbike spokes in bicycle wheels. I have not done this yet. It is just an idea I have been thinking about.
Thank you very much for taking the time to write !
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Old 03-31-21, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by DangerousDanR View Post
You don't mention what part of Canada you are in, but if it is the part that is in "The Great White North" (AL, SK, MB, etc.) you might want to consider getting a fat tire bike that can be ridden year round, even when there is snow on the ground. I found mine to be a blast down here in tropical, sunny, warm Fargo North Dakota...

If you are over on the left coast, then that older mountain bike sounds like a good idea.
Interesting...
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