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Why Dutch bikes are better(according to Not Just Bikes who lives in the Netherlands)

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Why Dutch bikes are better(according to Not Just Bikes who lives in the Netherlands)

Old 04-06-21, 09:44 AM
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satrain18
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Why Dutch bikes are better(according to Not Just Bikes who lives in the Netherlands)

In this video, Not Just Bikes outlines why you should ride Dutch upright bikes exclusively and why you shouldn't be riding hybrids or road bikes. Unsurprisingly, he gets called out in the comments section, mostly over the fact that the country he moved to from Canada, the Netherlands, is flat. His (typical)response to criticism is they should get a Dutch bike with internally geared hubs, which are still insufficient for hills. I want to know what's your opinion about this video, but in my opinion, he comes off as condescending.
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Old 04-06-21, 09:48 AM
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70sSanO
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They do make good “grovel” bikes.

John

Last edited by 70sSanO; 04-06-21 at 10:16 AM.
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Old 04-06-21, 09:52 AM
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Ogsarg
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Why get worked up about it? Basically a troll looking for reaction. It doesn't deserve viewing or comment.
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Old 04-06-21, 09:55 AM
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Reflector Guy
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We already examined this topic seven ways to Sunday.... Buying a Dutch style bike in the US?
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Old 04-06-21, 09:57 AM
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German soldiers sure thought so.

"Eerst mijn fiets terug"
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Old 04-06-21, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
In this video, Not Just Bikes outlines why you should ride Dutch upright bikes exclusively and why you shouldn't be riding hybrids or road bikes.
No, he doesn't claim you should ride "Dutch" bikes exclusively. He simply points out why they're useful if your bike is used strictly for transportation.
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Old 04-06-21, 06:32 PM
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I don't find him at all condescending. My ebike is like a a Dutch bike, with rack, panniers, internal hub gears, step-through and swept-back bars. It functions as my station wagon, as I don't own a car.

All my other bikes have lots of gears because unlike a Dutch commuter, I almost always ride more than 3km at a time in hot, humid and hilly conditions. For the same reasons, when riding non-electrically, I dress for the for the journey rather than the destination. And when I get to the destination, you better believe I need to have a wash and a change of clothes!
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Old 04-06-21, 07:22 PM
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Lol that channel is literally just "you can ride bikes for things other than sport and this is great." That being said those bikes look slow as ****, and unless you need the comfort I would take a sleek hybrid with a rack/basket/panniers for general use any day
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Old 04-06-21, 08:41 PM
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satrain18
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz View Post
Lol that channel is literally just "you can ride bikes for things other than sport and this is great." That being said those bikes look slow as ****, and unless you need the comfort I would take a sleek hybrid with a rack/basket/panniers for general use any day
Keep in mind that he now lives in the Netherlands, where riding a non-upright bike(road bikes, especially) is considered taboo. The Dutch generally have negative attitudes towards road cyclists, even having a pejorative for them—wielrenner.

Last edited by satrain18; 04-06-21 at 08:44 PM. Reason: Typo
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Old 04-06-21, 09:10 PM
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My impression is that he's just enthusiastic about his bike and the experience of riding in the world's most bike friendly city. The traditional Dutch bike is a great example of a technology that has evolved to a high state of refinement within a particular niche, that itself has undergone continuous refinement.

A friend of mine from the Netherlands told me that the Dutch are as style conscious about their bikes as anybody, but the traditional bike is the one that doesn't call attention to itself.

My commuting bike isn't radically different from his, just built from locally available components and adapted to my local terrain. It's certainly no less reliable.
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Old 04-06-21, 10:11 PM
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I already put a bunch of comments in that video. LOL. Using deraileurs there for commuting is of course completely STUPID, and rare. I would still definitely say I want more than 1 speed. Far better to have a startup gear and then shift at 10 mph. This is how my SA 3 works now, 48/ 65/ 86 it is I think. You are stuck going with the flow there anyway, bending over would be laughable.
I rode this 85.5 miles RT to the lake out west on the hilliest route here. I surprisingly had very little problem, just overall slower of course. I guess I waggled some of the hills.

I just bought a roadster with a Nexus 7 and roller brakes, to use the frame with my SA XL-RD5w and XL-FDD wheels.
The roller brakes kind of work, but they are still a stupid drag. The 7 speed and 5w are the same kettle of fish, the 7 just has 2 more. LOL.
I have been using both with 34 to 84/ 86 GI. I would absolutely say the Nexus 7 could do commutes in 98% of the USA just fine.
Same GIs gets the same results, minus extra weight I suppose. Nothing but SA drum brakes for me though.
Way better at hills than the way I had it with 46 to 117 GI. In May I'll compare highway results with diff range GIs.
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Old 04-06-21, 10:43 PM
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Dutch bikes are awesome! Ilove my Dutch bike.


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Old 04-07-21, 04:15 AM
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I will stick with my Norco Scene 1 bike for daily use.
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Old 04-07-21, 04:35 AM
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Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
Keep in mind that he now lives in the Netherlands, where riding a non-upright bike(road bikes, especially) is considered taboo. The Dutch generally have negative attitudes towards road cyclists, even having a pejorative for them—wielrenner.
Next to Belgium, the Dutch have the highest number of Pro cyclists per capita so they can’t be too negative towards road cyclists.
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Old 04-07-21, 05:13 AM
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I think it's unfair to call him condescending (OP). I didn't feel there was gratuitous bashing. He did have a pretty limited set of assumptions about the purpose of the bike and the riding environment. He didn't explore when those might not apply and how it could turn some of those pros into cons. But it was almost self-evident.

Cycling around Amsterdam is a joy. I first went there on a group trip as part of a school thing. Most folks wanted to go to the cafes. I wanted to get on a bike and ride until I saw a windmill.
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Old 04-07-21, 06:03 AM
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After watching the video I don't want a dutch bike, I want their cycling infrastructure in more cities.
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Old 04-07-21, 06:33 AM
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Amsterdam is dead flat. Those bikes work great there. I'm not sure I would really want to be pushing 40 pounds of expensive lead pipe up and down the hills between our house and work.
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Old 04-07-21, 07:00 AM
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I'm strong, but pretty sure I couldn't keep up on an A group ride on one of those.

As always, ride what you want.
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Old 04-07-21, 07:10 AM
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I own a Dutch bike. Lekker is a Dutch business based in Australia. As for hub gears not being efficient to get up hills, mine certainly gets me up the hill to my home without any issue.


Lekker Amsterdam M2
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Old 04-07-21, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Aussie_Cyclist View Post
I own a Dutch bike. Lekker is a Dutch business based in Australia. As for hub gears not being efficient to get up hills, mine certainly gets me up the hill to my home without any issue.
That's not a typical Dutch bike which usually have 3 speed hubs, steel rims, fenders, chainguard and drum brakes. The video in the OP was talking about Omafeits, not a modern bike with a carbon fork and a belt drive. I have a Dutch bike, it had been modified with a Rohloff. Still too heavy for the hills around here, even with decent gear ratios. I think the hub cost more than the rest of the bike did. I didn't get that part, unfortunately.

If anyone is in Winnipeg and is interested in a more traditional Dutch bike, the Plain Bicycle Project just got 500 refurbed Dutch bikes. https://www.plainbicycle.org/
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Old 04-07-21, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
In this video, Not Just Bikes outlines why you should ride Dutch upright bikes exclusively and why you shouldn't be riding hybrids or road bikes.
He doesn't say that at all. He says that for urban commuting, the omafiets is more practical and better suited to the task. He then goes through the features of the bike to bolster his case. I think he has a point.

His bigger point that the Dutch see bikes as everyday, all weather transportation is even more interesting as this is fundamentally different to how the majority of North Americans see bikes. There are many other interesting videos about that topic.

Last edited by Hiro11; 04-07-21 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 04-07-21, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
Keep in mind that he now lives in the Netherlands, where riding a non-upright bike(road bikes, especially) is considered taboo. The Dutch generally have negative attitudes towards road cyclists, even having a pejorative for them—wielrenner.
Is 'wheel runner' really some condescending term or does it just describe the difference between people using upright transportation bicycles and people using sporting/exercise bicycles?

For road bikes to be taboo, the Dutch sure do have gobs of professional 'wheel runners'. They have world elite cyclocross and road riders.
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Old 04-07-21, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
He doesn't say that at all. He says that for urban commuting, the omafiets is more practical and better suited to the task. He then goes through the features of the bike to bolster his case. I think he has a point.

His bigger point that the Dutch see bikes as everyday, all weather transportation is even more interesting as this is fundamentally different to how the majority of North Americans see bikes. There are many other interesting videos about that topic.
Without disagreeing, I'd put it a bit differently, which is that the Dutch see their bikes as part of a transportation system that doesn't exist in North America. Given the differences in our transportation systems, I'm not surprised that Americans emphasize the recreational aspect of cycling. Also, as a culture, we have a peculiar lack of differentiation between business and pleasure. We wear casual clothing to the office. Bike commuting is a mixture of utility and recreation for many of us. I own a bike that would not seem out of place in Amsterdam, save for aspects that are purely aesthetic. But I also own a sporty bike, and see no reason to deprive myself of riding it to work for sheer enjoyment.

It's interesting to think about the "evolution" of the Dutch bike. Evolution suggests a relatively consistent and stable environment, long enough for adaptation to occur. Amsterdam is such a place, "North America" is not, so the comparison is apples and oranges. When niche environments establish themselves in the US, it turns out that bike technology adapts itself to prevailing local conditions. An example is any large university campus, where the preferred bike is "anything with wheels, zero maintenance, abandoned upon graduation." The bikes parked in the racks at the big ten university near my house are anything but sporty, and are in fact treated as everyday transportation.

Clothing adapts itself too. Instead of calling it bike-specific clothing, we could call it climate-specific clothing. San Diego weather won't arrive in Amsterdam for another couple decades at least, and when it does, the Dutch will certainly adapt.
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Old 04-07-21, 11:20 AM
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When the kids were little, I used to ride my wife's dutch bike with them around the park. It was the best bike for that situation. Low speed, lots of stopping and short distances. And of course I had to carry the kids' sand toys and extra clothes, etc etc.
Nowadays I ride 6 miles each way to the office. Not a long distance, but it would be miserable to have to ride a dutch bike that far.
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Old 04-07-21, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
For road bikes to be taboo, the Dutch sure do have gobs of professional 'wheel runners'. They have world elite cyclocross and road riders.
When I was in the Netherlands a couple of decades ago, the only bike I remember seeing was a guy on a racing bike. With lycra shorts printed to look like jeans. So that is a matter of embarrassment for him now, no doubt. I may have seen teenagers on bikes, don't remember that very well. The place we stayed was built on reclaimed land, so it was really flat. Perfect place to ride a bike for transportation most of the time.
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