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Bike Shoes that recede and turn into sneakers

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Bike Shoes that recede and turn into sneakers

Old 04-10-21, 04:46 AM
  #26  
Kapusta
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Originally Posted by Trevtassie View Post
You are the one who started talking about hiking boots.
I had a pair of 510 SPD sneakers, they were rubbish, one of the insoles broke in half mid tour, If you want flex, try riding in a shoe with the insole gaffer taped together. That and falling on my butt every time the grass was wet on a hill turned me off "sneaker" style bike shoes with out lugs. OK if you only walk on flat grippy surfaces, but anything slippery and sloping and you're into roller skate territory.
You are so busy arguing with everyone you can that youíre getting us confused.

No, I am NOT the one who started talking about heavy weight hiking boots. In our discussion, that was you.

And regarding deep lugs... read what I wrote. I was talking about use with flat pedals. And for that you do not want deep lugs. You actually want a very minimal tread. There is a reason that shoes designed for flat pedal use have minimal tread. Look at any pair of 5-10s or Ride Concept shoes. People have been using these to push bikes up steep dirt trails for a long time. Apparently pretty much everyone who rides mtb in flat pedals has a different take on this than you do. Iíve never once slipped and fallen in my Ride Concepts.

I own a pair of stiff hiking boots like you describe. They kind of suck to ride in IMO.

Personally, Iíll give up a little bit of grip walking on wet grass to gain a massive amount of grip on my pedals.

Last edited by Kapusta; 04-10-21 at 04:50 AM.
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Old 04-10-21, 04:34 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
I was talking about lighter weight hiking shoes, not heavy weight boots. Like my Tevas, Azolo, and Solomons.

Hiking boots for heavy loads or off trail hiking are not what the OP is looking for or what would fill the niche of sneakers..Or what I want to ride in.
I agree with what you've said and will just add that most hikers are getting away from heavy hiking boots and are transitioning to light weight trail running shoes. Unless you're hiking in the winter, they may get wet, but they also dry out quickly due to their mostly mesh uppers.
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Old 05-05-21, 02:00 PM
  #28  
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We have some Bontrager cycling shoes that I'd like to find again! They are set up for 2 bolt SPD cleats, and recessed for walking. They have the BOA system laces, with one velcro strap. Super stiff, like a typical road shoe, but with the recessed SPDs they are great for walking about when touring. I have two pairs of mountain bike type lugged spd shoes, but they are more flexible and a bit harder to clip in on. Can't fine the Bontragers any more, any suggestions?
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Old 05-07-21, 08:29 AM
  #29  
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I just picked up a pair of Giro Rumble VR shoes for my upcoming European tour. Super comfortable right out of the box, and off the bike they feel exactly like lightweight hiking shoes.

Giro Rumble VR
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Old 05-07-21, 01:22 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by redcon1 View Post
I just picked up a pair of Giro Rumble VR shoes for my upcoming European tour. Super comfortable right out of the box, and off the bike they feel exactly like lightweight hiking shoes.
Giro Rumble VR
Just for reference;
  • The Giro Rumble VR shoes weigh in at 850g for the pair
  • My Merrell Alverstone Hiking Shoes weigh 764g
  • The Scott MTB Comp Boa shoes I picked after trying lots of different MTB and XC shoes is 740g
  • The very light Shimano RX8 Gravel shoe weighs in at just 530g
Unless one is racing, then comfort probably takes priority over grams. Still, "comfort" depends in part of what type of pedal is used in combination with the stiffness of the shoe. For example, Shimano's current MTB shoes - the MT3, MT5, and MT7 - only have a stiffness index of "4" on Shimano's own 0-12 scale. Shimano recommends wide, caged SPD pedals for that stiffness level. You have to get up to a Shimano shoe stiffness index of "6" before they recommend use with a bare SPD pedal like the PD-M520, M540, or M8100.
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Old 05-07-21, 03:05 PM
  #31  
Bill in VA
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Originally Posted by ridelikeaturtle View Post
But lord do I hate toeclips. Can't get in them, can't get out of them. I'm not even sure they really work.
Failure to master a technology does not mean it does not work. Toe clips and straps were part of the professional peloton for many, many years until the clipless introduction and are still used in Keirin racing in Japan. I used toe clips and straps for 40 years, both with slotted cleats and with flat cycling shoes as well as sneakers, and hiking shoes for casual riding, longer rides, and short hops. Toe clips come is sizes and depths. Proper selection of clip length and depth for your foot and shoe design, and strap tightness (depending on need) determines the ease of use.

But to the OP, my SPD mountain bike shoes were very walkable for any walking I would do during a bike ride or a bike meander. The recessed SPD cleats never clicked on any smooth tiled floors. The heel lugs made walking easy. I would not choose them for a 5 mile walk, but for walking during a ride for a break or meal was natural. Some of the other models like the Bontrager would probably be even more sneaker-like, but stiff for riding and clipping in.

I moved away from the SPD pedals, and back to toeclips and straps using flat, stiff, lace-up mountain bike shoes designed for pinned platform pedals. I did this so a quick hop in sneakers or hiking shoes was possible without putting on SPD or other dedicated cycling shoes. I avoided pinned platform pedals to avoid tearing up my legs. These flat bike shoes look like sneakers. 5-10 and Shimano make them as do others in many colors. Additionally, it felt more natural to me after so many years in TC&S.
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Old 05-08-21, 05:51 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post
... I avoided pinned platform pedals to avoid tearing up my legs....
Wow, you can't pedal a bicycle without "tearing up" your legs? Failed to "master the technology" of flat pedals? Damn.

(That "passive aggressive" BS works both ways.)
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Old 05-09-21, 10:55 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
An alternate suggestion is go with flats with a big platform. That eliminates the need for stiffness under the ball of the foot.
This is the way Iíve been riding the last five years or so. I use big platform pedals and typically wear knit running shoes until it gets below 40 degrees F. Below that I use low cut hiking shoes. Itís working great. I will say that my feet do get a workout, but Iíve had absolutely no comfort issues over that time.

Otto
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Old 05-09-21, 10:59 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post
I avoided pinned platform pedals to avoid tearing up my legs.
Iíve preferred the cheap plastic pedals with molded nubs instead of metal pins. They are probably a bit less scratchy. It definitely hasnít been an issue.

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Old 05-09-21, 11:20 AM
  #35  
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For the average cyclists studies have shown virtually no advantage to clipped in pedals. Very few cyclists actually pull on the upstroke.
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Old 05-09-21, 12:23 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
For the average cyclists studies have shown virtually no advantage to clipped in pedals. Very few cyclists actually pull on the upstroke.
For steady-state, moderate-effort cycling, as tested in most of the studies, that's accurate. For sprinting and high-effort hill climbing, less so. On the rare occasions that I ride using toe clips and cleatless shoes, I have to remind myself to keep my foot on the pedal or else I repeatedly pull my foot out of the toe clip, especially when standing and climbing or accelerating. I'm not even aware that I pull back and up with my clipless pedals until I ride a bike without them.
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Old 05-09-21, 01:16 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
For the average cyclists studies have shown virtually no advantage to clipped in pedals. Very few cyclists actually pull on the upstroke.
My understanding is that it is biomechanically impossible to exert maximal force down with one leg and up with the other while in the sitting position you're in on a bike.

I'm not sure if it's completely impossible, or if it's just less efficient to do. Winningvracers unweight the pedal on the upside but don't pull up any more than that.

Edit: here's an article on it:
https://www.cyclefit.co.uk/journal/correct-pedalling-technique

Last edited by PaulRivers; 05-09-21 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 05-09-21, 01:58 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
For steady-state, moderate-effort cycling, as tested in most of the studies, that's accurate. For sprinting and high-effort hill climbing, less so. On the rare occasions that I ride using toe clips and cleatless shoes, I have to remind myself to keep my foot on the pedal or else I repeatedly pull my foot out of the toe clip, especially when standing and climbing or accelerating. I'm not even aware that I pull back and up with my clipless pedals until I ride a bike without them.
Usually when I'm trying to get quickly moving from a low speed, instaforce + clipless = rear wheel lifts.
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Old 05-09-21, 02:14 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by ridelikeaturtle View Post
Adidas VeloSamba, if you can find them. Nicer than most of my regular shoes.

Thanks! I signed up on the Adidas website to be notified when these are in stock again. The introduced these a few month ago and theyíre sold out already. A few reslers asking 2x the retail price.
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