Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Best to worst components on modern bikes ?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Best to worst components on modern bikes ?

Old 05-05-21, 08:24 AM
  #26  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 7,163

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2792 Post(s)
Liked 1,425 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by utku1985 View Post
would that be comfy never drive one. ?
Hybrids are a cross between a mountain bike and a road bike. Why I could never figure out.

Those are two entirely different types of riding and one bike will never do either well. IMO of course.

When I see people on hybrids that claim them comfortable then they have usually pushed the saddle back as far as it'll go or gotten a seat post with a large set back. When they do that, they are putting their saddle pretty much in the position that a cruiser style bike will be at with it's seat tube at a more acute angle.

Cruisers also tend to come with what to me is a more comfortable swept back handlebar. Hybrids have flat bars that work well for riding off road in rugged terrain, but not so much for riding paved surfaces. Which are you going to do the most riding on? That is what your bike should be.

If you are going to do both off road and road biking. Get two bikes. If you want to ride comfortably on paved surfaces but not go all out like many of us high intensity freaks, then get a cruiser style bike. Trek actually has some good ones out that are very inexpensive and with at least 7 cogs on the rear. Some models have more cogs for more dollars.

Last edited by Iride01; 05-05-21 at 08:28 AM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 05-05-21, 09:09 AM
  #27  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 199 Times in 139 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Hybrids are a cross between a mountain bike and a road bike. Why I could never figure out.

Those are two entirely different types of riding and one bike will never do either well. IMO of course.

When I see people on hybrids that claim them comfortable then they have usually pushed the saddle back as far as it'll go or gotten a seat post with a large set back. When they do that, they are putting their saddle pretty much in the position that a cruiser style bike will be at with it's seat tube at a more acute angle.

Cruisers also tend to come with what to me is a more comfortable swept back handlebar. Hybrids have flat bars that work well for riding off road in rugged terrain, but not so much for riding paved surfaces. Which are you going to do the most riding on? That is what your bike should be.

If you are going to do both off road and road biking. Get two bikes. If you want to ride comfortably on paved surfaces but not go all out like many of us high intensity freaks, then get a cruiser style bike. Trek actually has some good ones out that are very inexpensive and with at least 7 cogs on the rear. Some models have more cogs for more dollars.
I don't think OP is looking for off road, which is a good thing since hybrids aren't great for anything rougher than crushed limestone or hard packed dirt. You are correct about flat handlebars, which seem like something the bike brands should consider getting rid of, since they aren't great for many riders who buy hybrids.
While cruisers often come with swept back handlebars, you can certainly spec your bike with whatever style handlebar suits your riding style and is most comfortable, such as a North roads bar. There are even alt handlebars that have 2 or even 3 positions, such as the Surly Moloko bar, the Velo Orange Casey bar, Jones H bar, or Trekking bars. And, a hybrid is, or can be lighter and more responsive than a relatively heavy beach cruiser. Now, some of these are workarounds to fix a problem people have with flat bars, such as the uncomfortable position a flat bar puts the wrist in, and the lack of hand positions, but then again, these days, there are so many variations of drop bars people can pick as well.

Last edited by MRT2; 05-05-21 at 09:18 AM.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 05-05-21, 09:24 AM
  #28  
UCantTouchThis
Senior Member
 
UCantTouchThis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 545 Post(s)
Liked 1,147 Times in 548 Posts
Originally Posted by jaxgtr View Post
I found this FX 4 Carbon for my wife recently in the used market and swapped the wheels out with some Trek Aeolus Pro 37's, put a 14-28 cassette and Xpedo Spry platform pedals on it. She loves it.


Sorry, I have absolutely nothing to offer to this topic other than, that is one sweet looking bike!
UCantTouchThis is offline  
Likes For UCantTouchThis:
Old 05-07-21, 08:10 PM
  #29  
Dirt Farmer
Senior Member
 
Dirt Farmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Madison, Wi.
Posts: 1,169

Bikes: Jamis Quest Elite; Fuji Sagres; Trek Fuel EX 8

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 48 Posts
Vintage!

Suntour!
Dirt Farmer is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.