Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Training for 40 mile ride question

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Training for 40 mile ride question

Old 07-04-21, 03:27 AM
  #26  
friday1970
Senior Member
 
friday1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Posts: 636

Bikes: Optima Baron LR, '14 Nishiki Maricopa,'87 Trek 330 Elance, '89 Miyata 1400, '85 Peugeot PGN10, '04 Fuji Ace, '06 Giant Rincon, '95 Giant Allegre, '83 Trek 620, '86 Schwinn High Sierra

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 96 Posts
Originally Posted by Nishiki89 View Post
Good point about conditioning for being in the saddle. Also Iíll make sure to stay on top of my infra-ride nutrition.

I ride an Ď89 Nishiki road bike. Itís not fancy or super lite but I love it. As for tires Iíve got 23mm Continental Ultra Sport 2ís.
A 1980's steel bike is perfect for a 40 mile ride. An older steel frame does very well in absorbing the road buzz. You find quite a few randonnuers riding older steel framed bikes because of the comfort steel provides on longer distance rides. Your 23mm Conti Ultra Sport 2 tires are decent. I have a pair of Conti Ultra Sport 27"x32mm tires on my older 1983 Trek 620 and they roll very well.
You have all you need. If I could be picky, I would suggest finding out what is the largest tire your bike can take. 23mm tires need to be pumped to higher pressures to avoid pinch flats, which means the ride could be a bit harsh. You would be surprised how much energy your body uses to counter shocks from road bumps, and larger tires with lower pressures helps alleviate this.
friday1970 is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 04:57 AM
  #27  
livedarklions
High Performance Noodler
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 13,649

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7124 Post(s)
Liked 7,248 Times in 4,069 Posts
Originally Posted by guachi View Post
All of this. My only other piece of advice is to stop at every aid station, even if it's just 30-60 seconds. Ask yourself if you're feeling okay. Ask yourself if the pace is good. Drink water. get a bite to eat. Get back on the bike.

If you've never ridden 41 miles before then literally whatever time you get will be your personal best. So don't overdo it only to crack at the 35-mile mark.
Originally Posted by Nishiki89 View Post
Good point about conditioning for being in the saddle. Also Iíll make sure to stay on top of my infra-ride nutrition.

I ride an Ď89 Nishiki road bike. Itís not fancy or super lite but I love it. As for tires Iíve got 23mm Continental Ultra Sport 2ís.

I don't think it's unusual not to need to eat during a 41 mile ride. I'm someone who rides 100-150 mile rides at age 60, and I've never understood what the basis for "don't wait until you're hungry" advice is. As I was building up distances, I never followed that, and I've never come close to a bonk. And my endurance speed is pretty fast. I have no idea whether you'll need food because I think that's highly individual, but I don't think you should worry if you don't feel like eating and your legs are still moving well.

I also find my need for water varies a lot with the weather --hot and/or headwinds increase my need. On a cool calm day, I can go 100 miles on a single bottle of water. On hot days, I may have to make more than one convenience store stops to refill my two bottles.

Long story short, I think you'll know if you need to eat or drink, and with that many stations, don't worry if you would rather just ride past one or two of them. Myself, I would actually find stopping every 8-10 miles distracting and a little frustrating, but I'm definitely not holding myself out as the norm. I'm just saying different people do this differently, so don't panic if you find that someone's advice doesn't seem to suit you. This really isn't a high risk for exhaustion activity.
livedarklions is offline  
Likes For livedarklions:
Old 07-04-21, 05:51 AM
  #28  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 2,302

Bikes: 2021 S-Works Turbo Creo SL, 2020 Specialized Roubaix Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 700 Post(s)
Liked 3,264 Times in 1,138 Posts
I’d go ahead and ride your ten mile route 4 times in one day as soon as possible. Take a 30 minute break after each ten mile ride. Slow your pace on the rides if you need to. Stay hydrated. Have a snack after each ten miles if you feel you need it. If you stretch, you can do that during each stop.

I think you’ll find you can ride 40 miles with no trouble…today.

For reference, my wife and I did a 25 mile ride last year. She wasn’t even riding once a week at the time and her average ride was about 12 miles. She was riding a 7 speed city bike. She’s 64. She was tired when we were done but had absolutely no problem. Oh, forgot to mention she crashed about three miles in and rashed her knee up pretty good.
MattTheHat is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 06:18 AM
  #29  
livedarklions
High Performance Noodler
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 13,649

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7124 Post(s)
Liked 7,248 Times in 4,069 Posts
Originally Posted by Random11 View Post
Somebody in these forums, some time ago, said you should be able to ride as far in a day as you typically ride in a week. At the time, I wanted to do a century and was riding only 15-20 miles a day, but almost every day and more than 100 miles a week. I tested out that idea and with no more training rode my century--107 miles. Also, I'm 71, so I have a few years on you.. I'm agreeing with everyone else who's added to this thread. I wouldn't try to discourage you from more training, but you are already in good shape to do the 40 miles.
That's really cool!
I think the key to your ability to make that jump may have been that your riding was approximately daily. TBH, I think the biggest barrier to expanding the distance is probably psychological, so this might come down to whether the OP is more comfortable doing this for the first time solo or in a group. More than anything, I think we should probably be reassuring that there's probably no wrong answer for how to prepare (other than prolonged couch sitting, maybe), and I think you've explained that nicely.

​​​​​​
livedarklions is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 06:27 AM
  #30  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,602
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 1,844 Times in 1,174 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I don't think it's unusual not to need to eat during a 41 mile ride. I'm someone who rides 100-150 mile rides at age 60, and I've never understood what the basis for "don't wait until you're hungry" advice is. As I was building up distances, I never followed that, and I've never come close to a bonk. And my endurance speed is pretty fast. I have no idea whether you'll need food because I think that's highly individual, but I don't think you should worry if you don't feel like eating and your legs are still moving well.

I also find my need for water varies a lot with the weather --hot and/or headwinds increase my need. On a cool calm day, I can go 100 miles on a single bottle of water. On hot days, I may have to make more than one convenience store stops to refill my two bottles.

Long story short, I think you'll know if you need to eat or drink, and with that many stations, don't worry if you would rather just ride past one or two of them. Myself, I would actually find stopping every 8-10 miles distracting and a little frustrating, but I'm definitely not holding myself out as the norm. I'm just saying different people do this differently, so don't panic if you find that someone's advice doesn't seem to suit you. This really isn't a high risk for exhaustion activity.
It all depends how hard you are riding, either by choice or terrain (mountains etc). For a 40 mile hilly ride at tempo I would typically drink 1 lite of energy/water mix and a couple of energy bars or gels. Just nibble and sip every 15 min or so throughout the ride and you shouldn't have any issues on that front. It's better to eat/drink little and often. As you are only conditioned to do 10 mile rides, you will probably benefit from a couple of short rest stops. But I wouldn't stop for long, just enough to stretch out and take a pee if required.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 01:27 PM
  #31  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 5,782

Bikes: RSO E-tire dropper fixie brifter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,986 Times in 1,326 Posts
In time, if you aim for a lot more miles in one ride, you'll likely find that dedicating the time to do it will be the most challenging thing; assuming you have a full-time job, typical life duties to tend to, a hobby more than just the bicycle...
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  
Old 07-04-21, 04:14 PM
  #32  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,341

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Liked 319 Times in 222 Posts
Originally Posted by Nishiki89 View Post
I just got back into riding after about a year off. I’ve been riding 10 mile rides at a crisp pace about 3-4 times a week for the past week and a half. I want to sign up for a 41 mile ride that’s about 4 weeks out. The terrain is similar to what I train on. Is it reasonable to train up to this distance in this short of a time frame?

Other important details are:
I’m 32 years old, not overweight, I’m in reasonable shape but not endurance athlete shape, the ride will have hydration stations every 8-10 miles. Terrain is gentle rolling hills with an average rise of 35’ per mile.
As a rule of thumb, you can comfortably ride your usual weekly average all at once if you pace yourself appropriately. You're already doing that.

As a rule of thumb, you want to avoid unpleasant surprises with things like fit by not riding more than 50% farther than your longest ride to date. Rounding, it would be prudent to try a 15 mile ride than a 25 mile ride before jumping straight to 40.

Note however that you'll need to ride much less intensely. E.g. in decent shape my average heart rate might be 155 bpm for a fast hour ride, 140 for four hours, or 110 all day.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Likes For Drew Eckhardt:
Old 07-10-21, 07:32 AM
  #33  
Metieval
Senior Member
 
Metieval's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,772

Bikes: Road bike, Hybrid, Gravel, Drop bar SS, hard tail MTB

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1172 Post(s)
Liked 273 Times in 191 Posts
Originally Posted by Nishiki89 View Post
I just got back into riding after about a year off. Iíve been riding 10 mile rides at a crisp pace about 3-4 times a week for the past week and a half. I want to sign up for a 41 mile ride thatís about 4 weeks out. The terrain is similar to what I train on. Is it reasonable to train up to this distance in this short of a time frame?

Other important details are:
Iím 32 years old, not overweight, Iím in reasonable shape but not endurance athlete shape, the ride will have hydration stations every 8-10 miles. Terrain is gentle rolling hills with an average rise of 35í per mile.
Easy, just take your "at a crisp pace" speed, ride just under that by 1-2 mph and you'll be fine.

I was doing 20's and turned it into a century riding with that effort level in mind.
Metieval is offline  
Old 08-01-21, 11:32 AM
  #34  
Nishiki89
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 3 Posts
*Update*

Good advice all. Yesterday I completed the ride. Strava measured it to be 42 miles. I also hit a personal best in average speed at 18.7 mph. Thatís nothing for many folks here, but that was a big improvement for me.

For training, I committed to 1 to 2 long rides a week, working up to 36 miles about 10 days out from the ride. I also did some interval sessions on a spin bike that we have at home. I kept those short and hard. Outdoors, I tried to keep all rides crisp and make the most of every moment. If it was a long flat I treated it as a time trial. If it was a MUT I worked on cadence and cornering (paying attention to the safety of pedestrians of course). Also of course I worked on climbing/descending with the short rolling hills I had.

Honestly I felt I could have done a metric century if I backed off the pace a bit. I was pretty smoked by the end of the ride, but I was more the pace than the distance.

Thanks everyone for the advice. Iím super glad I asked yíall. It opened my mind to what was possible and what I was already capable of. Iím now setting marks on a metric century in October.
Nishiki89 is offline  
Old 08-01-21, 01:34 PM
  #35  
Random11
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: North Florida
Posts: 373

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Diverge, 2021 Cervelo Caledonia

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 193 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 264 Times in 134 Posts
Originally Posted by Nishiki89 View Post
*Update*... Yesterday I completed the ride....
Excellent! Sounds like you're doing everything right. Send another update when you do that metric century.
Random11 is offline  
Old 08-07-21, 11:12 PM
  #36  
Mista Sparkle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Aurora, IL
Posts: 109

Bikes: 2007 Fuji Roubaix, 2018 Trek Marlin 5, Huffy Baron (Retired), Schwinn Twinn (On Deck)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Hey, great news!

I gotta say, if you're pulling off a 40 mile ride at 18.7MPH solo, you are likely underestimating yourself. Go out and find a full century, or a good moderate pace group ride. The big difference between what you are doing now and a century is likely not much other than eating, so eat every 20 miles or so and have fun.
Mista Sparkle is offline  
Old 08-08-21, 07:41 PM
  #37  
Nishiki89
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Mista Sparkle View Post
Hey, great news!

I gotta say, if you're pulling off a 40 mile ride at 18.7MPH solo, you are likely underestimating yourself. Go out and find a full century, or a good moderate pace group ride. The big difference between what you are doing now and a century is likely not much other than eating, so eat every 20 miles or so and have fun.

Thanks for the encouraging words! Iíll have to see whatís still available this season, but I will definitely set my sights on some bigger rides!
Nishiki89 is offline  
Old 08-11-21, 12:43 PM
  #38  
JayKay3000
Senior Member
 
JayKay3000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 50 Posts
I don't think distance is a the best aim really. People talk about it a lot because it sounds cool.

Use time as your measurement because distance is more about endurance than anything so if you can ride for 6 to 8 hours in a day with breaks and enough food then you can work out your limits. You might not be able to go as far as someone else in that 6 to 8 hours, but you can work on that aspect.

Distance is also a lot about learning to pace yourself to keep energy reserve and not go all out. You can probably climb faster if you're doing distance, but you might need that reserve for later.

Also I find it's good to pick a point of interest so you have something to ride to rather than just doing the numbers.
JayKay3000 is offline  
Old 08-13-21, 06:50 AM
  #39  
bikehoco
Slow But Steady
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 43 Posts
Riding 40 miles shouldnít be difficult for you. The only question is how you feel after the ride.
bikehoco is offline  
Old 08-13-21, 10:27 AM
  #40  
rwmct
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
For me, the limits have more to do with how long I can stand staying on the seat than how many miles the ride is. My butt gives out before my legs do.
rwmct is offline  
Old 08-16-21, 10:05 AM
  #41  
tkamd73 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400T, 1977 Trek TX900, 1982 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1986 Trek 400 Elance, 1991 Waterford PDG OS Paramount, 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 1985 Trek 670

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 536 Post(s)
Liked 777 Times in 419 Posts
If itís a ride and not a race, and no mountains involved, I can train for that in a bar. Itís only 40 miles, but Iím only 66 yrs old, and probably wonít average over 17mph.
Tim
tkamd73 is online now  
Old 08-16-21, 11:54 AM
  #42  
sayn3ver
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 139

Bikes: 1989 Bianchi Giro

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
To the OP:

I'm 35 and like 30lbs over weight. I started riding about a month a 1/2 ago after not riding a for over a decade (did other things like erging and the gym and kayak fishing.

I started out doing a few 5-10 mile rides then once my butt was a customed to my new saddle after two to three weeks miles started getting tacked on.

My personal struggle has always been saddle discomfort. Running cross country in highschool and crew in college, the endurance part for the engine and legs has never been a struggle for me. But saddle soarness and the occasional shoulder soarness certainly can take the pep out of my peddle on longer rides. The saddle discomfort was a large factor why I stopped years ago.

Anyways, my point being I went from 10 mile rides to 30mile rides several times a week in short order.

I could do 40 miles for a single outing and I have no doubt you could as well.

That's one bottle of sports drink and one bottle of water.

It's not a race so I wouldn't worry about hammering it for 40 miles. I would mentally think of it like two 20mile rides but that kind of mental stuff is different for everyone. If you have ever done interval training it's kind of how you have to prepare mentally in the off parts of the intervals...just focusing on the small manageable bits that you tackle one at a time.

With your description I would be surprised if you couldn't go out today and with a moderate pace for yourself just go ride it.

People in my area seem to hop on their mountain bikes, hybrids, a friend of a friends bike and do the city to shore ride (philly to ac so 50-75 miles depending on your start location) without fatality. Plenty train for it but I'd say at your age 40miles is a wake up one Saturday and do it sort of distance if you aren't worried about racing/placing/personal besting/etc.

Figure the average person can comfortably walk 3-4 miles per hour. That's 10 hours of walking for 40 miles. Most people would then go "that's too long I can't do that" yet they'll walk an amusement park like disney for 12 hours or more with their kids.

Last edited by sayn3ver; 08-16-21 at 11:57 AM.
sayn3ver is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.