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Best kind of Weight lifting for Cycling?

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Best kind of Weight lifting for Cycling?

Old 07-30-21, 05:50 AM
  #26  
shelbyfv
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Folks, as usual, OP has thrown this in the punch bowl and disappeared.
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Old 07-30-21, 06:15 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
The more I work out and the harder I work out, the less energy and time I have to devote to long-distance biking. So I want to balance it out and it seems a bit tricky.
This is the part that made me think it was just a simple fatigue issue. The balancing it out part is to do less of one thing and more of another, while not pushing beyond your total combined capacity. Rest and recovery is very important too. The easiest way to manage all this is to follow a simple structured training schedule with periods of maintenance, build and recovery.
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Old 07-30-21, 06:18 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Folks, as usual, OP has thrown this in the punch bowl and disappeared.
Good point. No further point unless the OP responds.
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Old 07-30-21, 07:10 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Folks, as usual, OP has thrown this in the punch bowl and disappeared.
He is too busy riding his bike and pumping iron and has no time to respond, while the rest of us is sitting at home and arguing about what's best for OP
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Old 08-01-21, 09:43 PM
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I'll surmise that cycling is very good at developing the main muscles needed for cycling quite well, and is also good at not ignoring supporting muscles to the levels required to support the main muscles. Most forms of cycling except track, usually need endurance more than ultimate strength. Most forms of road cycling racing or time trialing doesn't require the strength and power that weight training could give because most high output situations require mostly endurance and not short bursts of high power. That's why sprinters usually don't win tours or time trials.

Would you get some benefit from weight repetitions of main cycling muscles pushing them beyond the loads they are subjected to in intense cycling training? I would guess that every training manager of a road cycling team has a clear opinion on this, and that this isn't a mystery to them. Somebody has already tested this and all teams know the answer. One factor is recovery, When are you going to place an even greater load than training is already putting on these muscles that are already getting pushed hard from the cycling? Are you going to waste a day of cycling training for a weight training day and then another day for recovery?

Maybe there is some benefit to working some of the supporting muscles for injury prevention or potentially increasing total strength by making periphery muscles stronger. There may also be some advantage to building strength of main cycling muscles outside of the range that cycling works them.

I'll guess training cycling muscles to the strength required to win road races or time trials isn't as difficult as training them to the level of endurance required, and that endurance is the main focus.
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Old 08-02-21, 04:39 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Lakerat View Post
I'll surmise that cycling is very good at developing the main muscles needed for cycling quite well, and is also good at not ignoring supporting muscles to the levels required to support the main muscles. Most forms of cycling except track, usually need endurance more than ultimate strength. Most forms of road cycling racing or time trialing doesn't require the strength and power that weight training could give because most high output situations require mostly endurance and not short bursts of high power. That's why sprinters usually don't win tours or time trials.

Would you get some benefit from weight repetitions of main cycling muscles pushing them beyond the loads they are subjected to in intense cycling training? I would guess that every training manager of a road cycling team has a clear opinion on this, and that this isn't a mystery to them. Somebody has already tested this and all teams know the answer. One factor is recovery, When are you going to place an even greater load than training is already putting on these muscles that are already getting pushed hard from the cycling? Are you going to waste a day of cycling training for a weight training day and then another day for recovery?

Maybe there is some benefit to working some of the supporting muscles for injury prevention or potentially increasing total strength by making periphery muscles stronger. There may also be some advantage to building strength of main cycling muscles outside of the range that cycling works them.

I'll guess training cycling muscles to the strength required to win road races or time trials isn't as difficult as training them to the level of endurance required, and that endurance is the main focus.
Andrew Coggan/Hunter Allen briefly discuss slow, heavy weight lifting in their book "Training & Racing with a Power Meter". Their conclusion from both analysis and scientific studies was that it is NOT beneficial to most cyclists and can actually be detrimental to their performance. Perhaps a little more surprisingly, they also conclude that strength endurance training (e.g. low cadence "big gear" training) is also pretty ineffective - despite many coaches still advocating it. Maybe there are psychological benefits to their athletes?

They pretty much agree with everything you said in the above post i.e. strength plays very little part in cycling power output. It sounds slightly counter-intuitive but makes sense once you realise that pedal forces are very low compared to an individual's maximal strength, even when sprinting.

But this is all relative to pure cycling performance, not general fitness and health and in other activities where maximal strength may be much more important.

Personally I just follow a very simple light strength/mobility regime to compliment my cycling. The usual planks, squats, lunges, kettlebell swings and a bit of basic yoga.
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Old 08-02-21, 03:49 PM
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Old 08-02-21, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Andrew Coggan/Hunter Allen ... also conclude that strength endurance training (e.g. low cadence "big gear" training) is also pretty ineffective - despite many coaches still advocating it.
I don't know what qualifies as "strength endurance", but I've found that intentionally pushing a big gear up short climbs has given me the ability to get up grades of 14% or more.

Several weeks ago, before I started doing "big gear hill training", I was stalling out on the steep stuff. Recently, it has gotten easier.

My legs now look a bit less chicken-like, also.
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