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Replacement tires

Old 08-21-21, 12:51 PM
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Leisurebiker
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Replacement tires

Hello everyone. New to the site. Hope Iím in the right place. I have a Schwinn 12 speed aluminum comp mountain bike. Like lots of people, I suspect, I bought the bike for itís rugged look, as ALL of my riding is done on suburban roads and paved bike paths. I want to replace the 26Ē X 1.95 (559/53) knobby type tires with quieter, smoother riding /lower rolling resistance ones. The above tires are the original ones that came with the bike. Iím keeping the existing rims. Iím looking for a tire that gives less road surface feedback i.e, that buzzing or rubbing sound which I assume also impacts the rolling resistance somewhat. Iím not looking for a ďslickĒ or a road/racing tire but a fairly versatile one (hybrid?) that would run much quieter, smoother and seemingly ease pedaling effort, especially up moderate hills. I donít know if these are considered ďhybridsĒ but Iíve been looking at the Continental ďcontact plus travelĒ, Conti ďride tourĒ, the Conti ďtown and countryĒ or any of the Contiís similar to these that also offer a decent level of puncture resistance, and all tout a smooth quiet ride. Iím not necessarily wanting a hybrid tire, per se. Iím just wondering if these are categorized as such.

As I mentioned, Iím keeping the current rims, so I need to find a good performer that is compatible. Which leads to my question. In some cases, the tires Iíve been considering are available in the same 26 X 1.95 size. Some, however, are only offered in 26 X 2.0, 26 X 2.1 and 26 X 1.75. I already know that any of the alternative sizes should work, assuming that itís not necessarily best to stick with the exact same size as the original and also know full well, the inconsistencies of these numbers in the bike tire world. As mentioned above, my priorities are overall ride improvement, ( without being too harsh/uncomfortable over bumps), low rolling resistance and also, a decent degree of puncture resistance. Again, though a mountain bike, Iím using it strictly for riding on paved surfaces, though I would still expect whichever I choose, to have a decent grip in general.

Iíve done my research on the above mentioned tires and they all got decent reviews from users. Continental does seem to have an excessive amount of choices here, with a fair amount of redundancy in their attributes which makes choosing one all the more difficult, not to mention some quality control issues mentioned by quite a few people to compound the matter. And, mind you, Iím not averse to choosing a brand other than Continental. I just know them to be a reputable, well established player in the automotive world as well.

Thank you one and all for any feedback, and please feel free to offer up any other brands/options not mentioned here. Lastly, and please correct me if Iím wrong. Regarding choosing between the various tire widths mentioned above, is it true that a 26 X 1.75 tire will have a slightly harsher ride than what Iím currently used to with the knobby mtn bike tire, or any fatter tire for that matter? In other words, is a wider tire better, for that cushier ride or does that come at the expense of rolling resistance? Or does it really all depend on each manufacturer and the rubber compound that they use? Thanks again, everyone, for listening 😊👍👍
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Old 08-21-21, 01:21 PM
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CliffordK
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For the lowest rolling resistance tires, look at Compass/Rene Herse tires

For durability, I'd look at the Michelin Protek Cross Max

I've found the Protek tires have good traction and durability.

Several other brands have ruggedized commuting tires including Schwalbe Marathon Plus and Panaracer Tourguard.

I do have some favorite 700c tires, but not particularly relevant here
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Old 08-21-21, 03:19 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions. I considered the Schwalbe Marathon Plus as well. Heard many say they were tough to get on rim sometimes. Iíll check out the Michelin too. You consider either one of the above a better choice than any of the Contiís. I also looked at Specialized Hemisphere. Available in exact same size. Thoughts?
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Old 08-21-21, 03:51 PM
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My 26"x1.8" (actually more like 1.65") Compass/Rene Herse Naches Pass aren't harsh at all. Very smooth, fast, and comfortable on pavement. At my weight I use 32psi front, 40psi rear.

"Cry once."
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Old 08-21-21, 04:20 PM
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Kenda K838 Slick Wire Bead Bicycle Tire, Blackwall, 26-Inch x 1.95 Inch WILL BE THE BEST TIRE FOR RIDING A MOUNTAIN BIKE ON PAVED ROADS!!!

Don't laugh because "KENDA" manufactures this, as some folks wrongly equate Kenda with feces.
THIS IS A FANTASTIC TIRE THAT IS BOTH SUPREMELY COMFORTABLE AND REALLY FAST.

My brother in law, rode an old slightly modified Nishiki mountain bike with these exact tires to a podium finish in a sprint triathlon a few years ago. Yes, he likely would have won it if he was on his normal triathlon race bike, but it just shows that even riding equipment that shouldn't get you close to a podium finish if you're extremely strong and the competition is only average. I think he thinks that is a greater accomplishment than winning several other tri's on his proper triathlon race bike against formidable competitors. Anyway those KENDA K838 tires are superb!

https://www.amazon.com/Kenda-Bicycle...dp/B002DX1DWG/

I think that the same exact item is also often seen listed as Kenda 163026 Big City Slick Wire Bead 26 x 1.95


You should also search for these K838 KENDA Slicks 26 x 1.95 on EBAY as superb online bicycle-shop retailers like trailthis and others usually carry these at great prices when they do have them in stock.
Buy them from wherever you do get the best deal and best shipping.........The online retailer should be able to ship them without twisting them......just covering them with plastic that looks like a giant showercap and a shipping label....
Don't make the mistake of overlooking these great tires just because your bonehead local bike shop buddies don't carry Kendas and joke about them as being just POS. You've gotta remember those doofus boneheads at the LBS just wanna sell you something and they don't really care as long as their cash register rings up a sale because most road-bike oriented local bike shops don't really give a hit about mountain bikes or general beach cruisers........
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Old 08-21-21, 04:53 PM
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HI, I use the Schwalbe Marathon / Marathon Plus combo in front / rear configuration. You might want to try just the Marathons and see how you like them. They have low rolling resistance. Tough to get on and off? Hmmm, maybe a little more than some other tire / rim combos. But, technique helps too. Some tires just seem to fall off! Not sure how much I like that either. These Schwalbes wear well.
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Old 08-21-21, 05:27 PM
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You shouldn't have a problem find a 26" x XX tire for pavement use. Common sizes range from 26 c 1.5 to 2.0, larger and smaller exist. TRy a local bike shop, or even a cruiser bike shop (plenty of 26" bikes in those, so plenty of 26" tires, too). I've never been too concerned with brand, but more with puncture resistance, a little bit of tread, and that they are easy to put on/remove from my bike's rims (you don't want to be struggling fixing a flat on the side of the road).
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Old 08-21-21, 05:44 PM
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+1 to considering the Kenda K838 X 1.95 city slick tire. These used to sell for $18. I used them often to refurbish MTB bikes for kids. I liked the smoother ride enough that I replaced the knobbies on my Cannondale MTB with them. Much less annoying than the knobbies for use on roads or smooth trails. If you want a narrower tire with similar characteristics consider the K193 26x1.50. Both will fit your rim.

Kenda Kwest K193 26x1.5 $25 with free shipping https://www.ebay.com/itm/303770796195

Kenda Kwest K838 26x1.95 $27 with free shipping https://www.ebay.com/itm/282510778434


Lots of people like Schwalbe tires. Like most things from Germany (formerly owned 2 BMW motorcycles) they are premium priced. I've tried several different models in different wheel sizes and decided they are not worth the premium.
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Old 08-21-21, 07:05 PM
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I wore out a set of Compass RTPs on my 26er. I ride mostly smooth trails and a bit of road. They are easy rolling but such a pain to put on and take off. I donít know, but suspect it may be a byproduct of being ďtubeless readyĒ.

Anyway, I now run Continental Contact Speed 26x2.0 for the warmer, dryer season. Almost as good at rolling as RTP and 1000 times easier to deal with. I run Continental Race King Protection 26x2.2 on the wheels I run in winter when trails are saturated and either frozen or muddy.

Otto

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Old 08-21-21, 10:54 PM
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Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions! Youíve all given me plenty to mull over as far as brands and styles! One more question. As far as the width measurement - X 1.95, X 2.0, X1.75 etc. should I just stick with the 26Ē X 1.95 OR move an increment or two in either direction, assuming of course itís even possible to obtain low rolling resistance, quiet and smooth ride and decent traction all in one particular variant? Thx again!😀
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Old 08-22-21, 03:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Iíve been looking at the Continental ďcontact plus travelĒ, Conti ďride tourĒ, the Conti ďtown and countryĒ or any of the Contiís similar to these that also offer a decent level of puncture resistance, and all tout a smooth quiet ride.
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
For the lowest rolling resistance tires, look at Compass/Rene Herse tires

For durability, I'd look at the Michelin Protek Cross Max

I've found the Protek tires have good traction and durability.

Several other brands have ruggedized commuting tires including Schwalbe Marathon Plus and Panaracer Tourguard.

I do have some favorite 700c tires, but not particularly relevant here
Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Thanks for the suggestions. I considered the Schwalbe Marathon Plus as well. Heard many say they were tough to get on rim sometimes. Iíll check out the Michelin too. You consider either one of the above a better choice than any of the Contiís. I also looked at Specialized Hemisphere. Available in exact same size. Thoughts?
I like the Continental Gator Hardshells, but I don't believe they're available in 26. I haven't tried the other Continentals above, but they sound similar to the Protek, Marathon Plus, and Tourguard tires.

There was a recent discussion of Inverted Tread Tires Here. (Your Continental Town and Country above). Somewhat of a unique styling. A center bead by design, and in theory quicker rolling.

The Gator Hardshells are light, but with a tough rubber (which is a little slick). I think the other puncture resistant commuter tires have a softer rubber, giving better traction, and I would assume that also applies to the Continentals.

The Compass/Rene Herse tires are in a class of their own for lightweight, supple tires. If you want the "fastest" tire, for your bike, those are probably the ones.

I don't have any personal experience with durability of those tires, but it is probably a little less than some of the heavyweight touring tires.
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Old 08-22-21, 05:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Ö.One more question. As far as the width measurement - X 1.95, X 2.0, X1.75 etc. should I just stick with the 26Ē X 1.95 OR move an increment or two in either direction, assuming of course itís even possible to obtain low rolling resistance, quiet and smooth ride and decent traction all in one particular variant? Thx again!😀
Iím not familiar with that bicycle, but a key factor is distance between the stays. On my old mountain bike I can fit 2Ē of some tires but not others. The tireís marked width is not precise, even between models from the same brand. Either order with generous clearance or be prepared to return them.
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Old 08-22-21, 06:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions! Youíve all given me plenty to mull over as far as brands and styles! One more question. As far as the width measurement - X 1.95, X 2.0, X1.75 etc. should I just stick with the 26Ē X 1.95 OR move an increment or two in either direction, assuming of course itís even possible to obtain low rolling resistance, quiet and smooth ride and decent traction all in one particular variant? Thx again!😀
A small increment change in size shouldn't matter. Look at your current tires (front and back**) and see if they have extra clearance if you want to go with a bigger width. 1.5 - 2.0 are pretty common sizes.

** = its not unusual for an MTB to have different width tires on the front and rear.
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Old 08-22-21, 07:26 AM
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As much as I like Rene Herse tires they’re not cheap and might cost more than the bike did. I’d checkout some wire bead Schwalbe Big Apple tires, you can probably pick them up for ~25 each
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Old 08-22-21, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
As much as I like Rene Herse tires theyíre not cheap and might cost more than the bike did. Iíd checkout some wire bead Schwalbe Big Apple tires, you can probably pick them up for ~25 each
Big Apple and Big Ben are also good choices. A good bit heavier and a bit slower than Contact Speed, but more rubber, more wear, and more tread.

Otto
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Old 08-22-21, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by flangehead View Post
Iím not familiar with that bicycle, but a key factor is distance between the stays. On my old mountain bike I can fit 2Ē of some tires but not others. The tireís marked width is not precise, even between models from the same brand. Either order with generous clearance or be prepared to return them.
totally true. Thereís some clearance, but I think Iíd rather not risk it. Plenty of the recommendations that you and everyone else have suggested are available in my exact configuration and even accounting for the inconsistencies among the brands and sizing figures that are listed, Iím more comfortable not experimenting and having to go through the hassle of returns possibly multiple times. Unless there is some clear benefit to going slightly wider or slightly narrower with any particular brand/model, Iíll stick with the 26Ē X 1.95 or equivalent. Thanks
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Old 08-22-21, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
As much as I like Rene Herse tires theyíre not cheap and might cost more than the bike did. Iíd checkout some wire bead Schwalbe Big Apple tires, you can probably pick them up for ~25 each
No, definitively not cheap! Iím sure theyíre solid performers, which Iíll rule out for now, because I wasnít looking to spend that much. But I have been considering many of other models from Schwalbe and Iíll definitely take a look at the ones you mentioned. Thanks
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Old 08-22-21, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
As much as I like Rene Herse tires theyíre not cheap and might cost more than the bike did.
They certainly did in my case, but what can you do when the bike was a $20 purchase from a college auction?
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Old 10-14-21, 07:02 AM
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fwiw - not 26" but I used regular Proteks for a while. they were not difficult to mount. the larger sizes run wider than advertised the 700x40mm measure 43mm at 90 psi
see post #16 here
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Old 10-14-21, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by jameswheeler07 View Post
Steps to Changing a Road Bike Tire: It is important to get the size of your wheels and measure your old tires. The first step to take in this process is removing the bike wheels. You must loosen the brakes, then locate the quick-release levers for easy removal. The next step is to take the tire away from the rim. To remove it quickly, you must completely deflate the tires first. Then, you can use tire levers to separate the tire and the rim. The fifth step is to pull out the tube from the inside of the tire. At this point, you can change a road bike tire: First, lay the new tube flat and inflate the tube moderately. Next, let the tube slide slowly into the tire and line up the tire tube valve to the rimís valve hole. Finally, install the road bike tire onto the rim. The eighth step is to install the wheel back on the bike. Then, you are done.
Did you post this in the wrong thread?
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Old 10-14-21, 10:16 AM
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^ Possibly a bot.
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Old 10-14-21, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions! Youíve all given me plenty to mull over as far as brands and styles! One more question. As far as the width measurement - X 1.95, X 2.0, X1.75 etc. should I just stick with the 26Ē X 1.95 OR move an increment or two in either direction, assuming of course itís even possible to obtain low rolling resistance, quiet and smooth ride and decent traction all in one particular variant? Thx again!😀
Just look at your bike. How much space do you have between the tire and the chainstay. You don't have to measure it, unless it is really close.

Generally a larger tire will be more comfortable. A larger tire may or may not be faster or slower as there are just too many variables to consider between brands, rolling resistance, weight, durability, etc.

John
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Old 10-16-21, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
As much as I like Rene Herse tires theyíre not cheap and might cost more than the bike
I gave my Contact Speed tires to my son for his campus bike. Now running a Race King on the front and a Speed King on the back until itís so muddy I need both Race Kings. They are super fast. These are both current Black Chili versions of these tires.

I wore out a pair of Compass RTPs and the Speed King rides slightly more stable as a rear tire on trails and just as fast as the RTP, and the Race King is scarcely slower on the front and way more stable on softer trail sections.

Perhaps just as importantly, they are both at least 1000 times easier to deal with. I can take the Speed King on and off without tire levers and the Race King is super easy. The RTPs were obnoxiously hard to put on and take off, even after thousands of miles of riding.

Otto
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Old 10-17-21, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by ofajen View Post
I gave my Contact Speed tires to my son for his campus bike. Now running a Race King on the front and a Speed King on the back until it’s so muddy I need both Race Kings. They are super fast. These are both current Black Chili versions of these tires.

I wore out a pair of Compass RTPs and the Speed King rides slightly more stable as a rear tire on trails and just as fast as the RTP, and the Race King is scarcely slower on the front and way more stable on softer trail sections.

Perhaps just as importantly, they are both at least 1000 times easier to deal with. I can take the Speed King on and off without tire levers and the Race King is super easy. The RTPs were obnoxiously hard to put on and take off, even after thousands of miles of riding.

Otto
hard to get on and off is a wheel thing more than a tire thing, I have a set of Snoqualmie Pass tires on DT TK 540,s and Hurricane Ridges on Mavic Open Elites and they thumb on and off but you’re not the first person to complain about them being hard to put on. I recently had an issue getting a set of Schwalbe Racing Rays on WTB i25s they were a pain to mount and the tires needed to sit for almost a week at 90psi for the bead to seat even using soap water to lube them. I’m actually a bit nervous to ride the bike to far from help because they’re so hard to mount.

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Old 10-17-21, 06:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisurebiker View Post
Hello everyone. New to the site. Hope Iím in the right place. I have a Schwinn 12 speed aluminum comp mountain bike. Like lots of people, I suspect, I bought the bike for itís rugged look, as ALL of my riding is done on suburban roads and paved bike paths. I want to replace the 26Ē X 1.95 (559/53) knobby type tires with quieter, smoother riding /lower rolling resistance ones. The above tires are the original ones that came with the bike. Iím keeping the existing rims. Iím looking for a tire that gives less road surface feedback i.e, that buzzing or rubbing sound which I assume also impacts the rolling resistance somewhat. Iím not looking for a ďslickĒ or a road/racing tire but a fairly versatile one (hybrid?) that would run much quieter, smoother and seemingly ease pedaling effort, especially up moderate hills. I donít know if these are considered ďhybridsĒ but Iíve been looking at the Continental ďcontact plus travelĒ, Conti ďride tourĒ, the Conti ďtown and countryĒ or any of the Contiís similar to these that also offer a decent level of puncture resistance, and all tout a smooth quiet ride. Iím not necessarily wanting a hybrid tire, per se. Iím just wondering if these are categorized as such.

...snip...

👍👍

I once installed Conti Ride Tour tires on one of my road bikes. These tires turned my relatively smooth & efficient road bike into jarring, noisy, and harder to pedal bike. I suggest you avoid them if you are seeking a smooth and efficient tire for road riding. (The only thing positive I can say about them is that they were bulletproof, even off road.)
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