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New vs old bikes

Old 08-28-21, 08:03 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
By the time I change everything I may as well get a new or newer bike.
Bike rides should be enjoyable, not a chore. Setting the which bike is better argument aside.
Sometimes something new to you, can add to the enjoyment.

I vote to switch bikes. If you can get the fit on a newer bike. Then you can win and win.
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Old 08-28-21, 08:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
Bike rides should be enjoyable, not a chore. Setting the which bike is better argument aside.
Sometimes something new to you, can add to the enjoyment.

I vote to switch bikes. If you can get the fit on a newer bike. Then you can win and win.
Agree. Fit is paramount.

OTOH, I'm also of the opinion that a bike that was A Good Bike back in the 1980s, if properly maintained and bits replaced as needed, is STILL A Good Bike. But modern bikes have advantages, as I described above. I LOVE my 2020 Canyon Endurace, with it's light CF frame, the disc brakes, and the STIs and extra gears. I also LOVE my 1982 Lotus Supreme, with its lugged steel frame, the 6 limited gears shifted on the downtube, and the single pivot brakes.
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Old 08-28-21, 08:48 PM
  #28  
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As for the 2003 Trek 2300, there are those that tout 9 speed as Shimanoís pinnacle, but you are still buying and old bike that will come with itís own set of issues to address. The least of them, provided the shifters are still good, are no replacement hoods for those 6500 shifters.

When we get to a post-pandemic used bike market, hopefully there should be some used but close to new bikes at decent prices.

John
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Old 08-28-21, 09:10 PM
  #29  
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Thank you. I am trying to learn but itís more complicated than it used to be.
I donít use the drops on my bike now and am too old and fat tobwant more.
From reading I think an endurance bike would work better for me than a race style road bike.
I will be patient.
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Old 08-28-21, 09:14 PM
  #30  
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If the Raleigh were the right size, Iíd say itís a good candidate for conversion to single speed, but then say that about a lot of bikes. 😊 Bur since itís not an easy candidate for modern upgrade, maybe just keep it as a SS, if it fits?

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Old 08-28-21, 09:24 PM
  #31  
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As an SS?
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Old 08-28-21, 10:11 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
As an SS?
Depends on how flat it is where you live/ride. A single speed bike where I ride would be a bad joke, or a knee destroyer.
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Old 08-28-21, 10:14 PM
  #33  
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I just had a knee drained and cortisone added yesterday.
I rode 3.5 miles and walked 2 miles today with no discomfort, but I do have torn meniscus. I really donít want to aggravate it.
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Old 08-29-21, 06:28 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
I just had a knee drained and cortisone added yesterday.
I rode 3.5 miles and walked 2 miles today with no discomfort, but I do have torn meniscus. I really donít want to aggravate it.
Good to know. Probably not the time for a SS. Multiple gears lets you manage the workload better.

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Old 08-29-21, 06:50 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
In general very much a yes.

On specifics, it depends.

Most of it depends on your current Raleigh and how it has been maintained and if it has been upgraded over the years. If you are riding a 35 year old bike that has original parts and you haven’t been meticulous in maintaining it, then even a Tourney level modern bike might be an improvement.

If you happen to have a sub-20 lb (not sure any 80’s Raleighs are even in that realm) with with Dura Ace or Super Record in tip top shape, that Tourney level bike might not seem like an upgrade.

The problem will be what new bike you want to get. If you want to spend less than $1000, it will be better, but not the same better many people here might be thinking of.

John
Beat me to it. I'm guessing the OP has a bone stock 40 year old bike that really hasn't had much maintenance done to it. The bike itself could probably be made to run efficiently with a thorough tune-up (probably still has original cables also).

To the OP...I think even an entry level bike will be a massive upgrade from what you have now. If the old bike has sentimental value and you enjoy riding it, I recommend you take it to a local bike shop and have them give it a good look-over. New cables, some lube here and there, a wheel alignment....that might do the trick.

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Old 08-29-21, 08:05 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by pgjackson View Post
I recommend you take it to a local bike shop and have them give it a good look-over. New cables, some lube here and there, a wheel alignment....that might do the trick.
40 year old bike, new cassette, new chain, new cables (possibly new cable housing), new brake pads, true wheels, probably due for hub maintenance. Add in cost of labor......


Imo bad investment! the OP would be better off putting that money towards a newer bike.
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Old 08-29-21, 09:38 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
40 year old bike, new cassette, new chain, new cables (possibly new cable housing), new brake pads, true wheels, probably due for hub maintenance. Add in cost of labor......


Imo bad investment! the OP would be better off putting that money towards a newer bike.
I did say if the bike had sentimental value. The OP said it was his dad's old bike. Might be well worth the money to get it fixed up.
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Old 08-29-21, 09:48 AM
  #38  
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Iím not sentimental about it.
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Old 08-29-21, 09:50 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
There is little you can do with an bonded aluminum frame and 126mm dropouts.
Not true at all. You can screw a 7 sp freewheel on there and change to 7sp brifters. That and swap the brakes for dual pivot brakes and you have something that is very useable.
That is exactly how I set up my Centurion Ironman and itís perfectly rideable.
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Old 08-29-21, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
Iím not sentimental about it.
Then it's probably not worth fixing up. A good tune-up will probably cost about $300...likely more for that bike as I assume they will need to replace a lot of stuff.
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Old 08-29-21, 04:05 PM
  #41  
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On a bike that old, there's so many "ifs" that it's hard to say exactly what
it's going to need. A bike that's been abandoned in a shed for a decade or two is going to need different things than one that has tens of thousands of miles of constant use.
Either way, having a shop do the work, to say nothing of a major update, or a bar/control swap; puts the cost within shouting distance of a new or nearly-new entry level hybrid, that would probably suit the OP's needs better.

If he's so inclined, that old Raleigh probably is still a good bike, and 70s/80s bikes like that would be a good trainer if the OP wanted to learn how to fix it up himself.

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Old 08-29-21, 04:22 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Also .... I hate saying this over and over, and last time I looked, prices were rising .... but look at Bikes Direct. BD will ship a mostly assembled bike to your home. You shouldn't even need specialty tools to assemble it ... but you might want to make cable adjustments (check out the millions of how-to videos on YouTube.) These are no-name frames with decent parts, and they are new, which means you won't accidentally buy a bike which needs a few hundred dollars of work. Also, if the bike completely doesn't work, you can send it back for a nominal fee .... but if you go to a couple bike shops to get a better idea of what you want .... then you can buy it for less online, possibly.
The internet only model for buying bicycles is not the best choice for everyone. Some people will do well to purchase a bicycle at a shop where it can be properly fitted and maintained. Internet bikes do not come with service and not everyone has the skills and tools to properly assemble, repair and maintain a bike no matter how many videos they watch. Finally, it is not fair to waste the time of the bike shops when you never intend to purchase from them in the first place as you suggest.
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Old 08-29-21, 04:28 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by pepperbelly View Post
Would there be a noticeable difference between a bike from the Ď80s and s new bike?
I donít understand a lot about frame geometry but that seems to be really important.
I ride a Raleigh from the mid Ď80s and sometimes I feel as if I am fighting the bike.
Would there be a noticeable difference between a bike from the Ď80s and s new bike?
Yes, yes, yes in terms of comfort due to much better ergonomics and generally lighter weight.
I donít understand a lot about frame geometry but that seems to be really important.
Again, yes you should test a few different styles and sizes of bikes to see what you like based on where and how much you plan to ride.
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Old 08-29-21, 04:30 PM
  #44  
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Upgrading a 80's bike just isn't worth it.

Restoring it is. Going through the process of restoring your old road bike and riding the hell out of it makes the upgrade process that much more rewarding when you do finally get around to it.

My old 1980 norco was bent everywhere, paint falling off, horrible rust spots, but durable as hell. I ended up restoring everything and even upgrading bits of it here and there.

Was it worth the effort to restore it? Even though I dumped it shortly after, still got some great use out of it and a learning experience. Was it worth upgrading? Absolutely no. Not even if this is your only bike. Just don't waste your time.

Even todays entry level bikes are better than any of those old 80's bikes at least from a frame performance perspective, maybe not parts durability. But the starting point will always be what you currently have as well as your own physical conditioning
.
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Old 08-29-21, 05:31 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Upgrading a 80's bike just isn't worth it.

Even todays entry level bikes are better than any of those old 80's bikes at least from a frame performance perspective, maybe not parts durability. But the starting point will always be what you currently have as well as your own physical conditioning
.
That is just such bad info. So many quality frames made in the 80's in fact most consider that the pinnacle of steel bike frames.

Lost count of how many modern bikes I dropped riding this updated 80's frame.


87 with Campagnolo 11 speed groupset and Zonda wheels.

A few more samples


Or this 87 Paramount with 9 speed Dura Ace, handbuilt wheels, etc. 19 lbs even as in the picture.

85 Martelly built with tasteful upgrades too, well under 20 lbs and a flat out rocket.


I could go on and on. Not that this approach is for everyone. But a quality frame from any era is not going to hold a rider back more than the rider's fitness will unless maybe you're in the upper 1 percent of all riders.

In fact, I'm sort of in the process of proving this. I'm riding all my 20+ bikes over a similar route with a goal of hitting at least 19 mph avg on each one. 10 done so far and these bikes ages are at least 20 years apart. Steel, aluminum, carbon fiber, it doesn't matter. The bikes are not holding me back. The limit is me, the engine. In fact one of my fastest climbing bikes is also one of my heaviest steel bikes, 30 years old, and running a simple 8 speed double setup. And..., the C&V forum is full of examples of 80's bikes performing as well as or even better than a lot of today's carbon wonder bikes. Don't buy into the hype. :-)
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Old 08-29-21, 07:22 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
That is just such bad info. So many quality frames made in the 80's in fact most consider that the pinnacle of steel bike frames.

Lost count of how many modern bikes I dropped riding this updated 80's frame.


87 with Campagnolo 11 speed groupset and Zonda wheels.

A few more samples


Or this 87 Paramount with 9 speed Dura Ace, handbuilt wheels, etc. 19 lbs even as in the picture.

85 Martelly built with tasteful upgrades too, well under 20 lbs and a flat out rocket.


I could go on and on. Not that this approach is for everyone. But a quality frame from any era is not going to hold a rider back more than the rider's fitness will unless maybe you're in the upper 1 percent of all riders.

In fact, I'm sort of in the process of proving this. I'm riding all my 20+ bikes over a similar route with a goal of hitting at least 19 mph avg on each one. 10 done so far and these bikes ages are at least 20 years apart. Steel, aluminum, carbon fiber, it doesn't matter. The bikes are not holding me back. The limit is me, the engine. In fact one of my fastest climbing bikes is also one of my heaviest steel bikes, 30 years old, and running a simple 8 speed double setup. And..., the C&V forum is full of examples of 80's bikes performing as well as or even better than a lot of today's carbon wonder bikes. Don't buy into the hype. :-)
Truly great bikes. The quality of steel back then was far better than the quality of nearly all materials used for bikes today. But not the butting and hydroforming practices.

Its just.. gas pipe tubing is not ideal for bike frames. Its really not much of a problem until you reach the 25+" frames. Then, you will want a newer design frame.
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Old 08-29-21, 07:35 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Truly great bikes. The quality of steel back then was far better than the quality of nearly all materials used for bikes today. But not the butting and hydroforming practices.

Its just.. gas pipe tubing is not ideal for bike frames. Its really not much of a problem until you reach the 25+" frames. Then, you will want a newer design frame.
What???
Have you ridden 953 or 853 Reynolds tubing or Columbus XCr...There is a lot of really high quality steel tubing out there. Old technology is fine and a nice Reynolds 531 frame is a classic but it won't beat a modern frame. Having had a mix of modern and vintage steel frames and still have many of them I can say the modern stuff is nicer. I still love my vintage stuff but to say the quality was better is just silly. Certainly bigger brand steel frames might be a bit better in the vintage category than modern but a higher end custom frame is more likely to be better these days if made by a good builder.
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Old 08-29-21, 07:43 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
That is just such bad info. So many quality frames made in the 80's in fact most consider that the pinnacle of steel bike frames.

Lost count of how many modern bikes I dropped riding this updated 80's frame.


87 with Campagnolo 11 speed groupset and Zonda wheels.

A few more samples


Or this 87 Paramount with 9 speed Dura Ace, handbuilt wheels, etc. 19 lbs even as in the picture.

85 Martelly built with tasteful upgrades too, well under 20 lbs and a flat out rocket.


I could go on and on. Not that this approach is for everyone. But a quality frame from any era is not going to hold a rider back more than the rider's fitness will unless maybe you're in the upper 1 percent of all riders.

In fact, I'm sort of in the process of proving this. I'm riding all my 20+ bikes over a similar route with a goal of hitting at least 19 mph avg on each one. 10 done so far and these bikes ages are at least 20 years apart. Steel, aluminum, carbon fiber, it doesn't matter. The bikes are not holding me back. The limit is me, the engine. In fact one of my fastest climbing bikes is also one of my heaviest steel bikes, 30 years old, and running a simple 8 speed double setup. And..., the C&V forum is full of examples of 80's bikes performing as well as or even better than a lot of today's carbon wonder bikes. Don't buy into the hype. :-)
I doubt the OP wants to invest that kind of money into a build. Especially on a Raleigh frame.

I'd also like bring up the question that many who argue 80's are good. Their 80's bike is not their only bike?
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Old 08-29-21, 07:50 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
I'd also like bring up the question that many who argue 80's are good. Their 80's bike is not their only bike?
Hmm... my 80s road bike isn't bad, but my modern road bike and my 70's road bike are better.
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Old 08-29-21, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
I doubt the OP wants to invest that kind of money into a build. Especially on a Raleigh frame.

I'd also like bring up the question that many who argue 80's are good. Their 80's bike is not their only bike?
True, hence my comments at the end. The OP is restricted but a 126mm rear end on an aluminum frame. No coldsetting that to run modern gear. Plus it's cost prohibitive if you don't have the skills to do the work yourself.

As to your final point. I can't speak to anyone else but if I could only keep one of my bikes it really would be the 1985 Opus III. It's just magical out on the road and just as fast any anything else I have when propelled by my legs. 24.95 mile on it the other day at 1:18:07 for a 19.2 mph avg. DT shifters, 6 cogs in the back, 30 year old tubular rims, etc. Easily on par with anything else I have. Maybe I'm weird, LOL!
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