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Carbon with the feel of steel??

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Carbon with the feel of steel??

Old 09-08-21, 01:10 PM
  #51  
prj71
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Originally Posted by bruce19 View Post
Which is why all the pros ride 25 lb steel bikes?
Nobody here is a pro looking to shave seconds off their time for competitive race purposes.

With that said...one of the Tour de France riders on a 25lb steel bike would probably kick all of our asses in a race. So yes...it's the motor, not the bike.
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Old 09-08-21, 03:51 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
Nobody here is a pro looking to shave seconds off their time for competitive race purposes.

With that said...one of the Tour de France riders on a 25lb steel bike would probably kick all of our asses in a race. So yes...it's the motor, not the bike.
True but it's not the same issue. Said TdF rider who would kick our asses will be faster on a 17 lb bike than a 25 lb bike. So, some bikes will be "faster" than others for the same given "motor." That was what I was trying to say. If you don't think that's true, take the 17 and 25 lbs bikes on a long climb and see how you do.
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Old 09-08-21, 04:10 PM
  #53  
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I've never ridden a carbon frame that felt anything like steel. Which is why I've never bought one.
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Old 09-08-21, 05:30 PM
  #54  
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NO CARBON BIKE WILL EVER RIDE LIKE STEEL.!!!
and no matter what the Bikeforum experts say about "material doesn't matter" or talk up about all this highly theoretical concept of "carbon layup and design can be made to feel like anything... no matter what they say, in real life, reality, out in the real world, no carbon frames can ever come close to replicating the feel of steel. This is the reason why when pro racers retires and are not forced to ride carbon, they go for steel.
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Old 09-09-21, 07:00 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
This is the reason why when pro racers retires and are not forced to ride carbon, they go for steel.
They do? Cant say I have heard of this, or that Ive seen it in many pictures of retired pro riders.
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Old 09-09-21, 07:17 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
They do? Cant say I have heard of this, or that Ive seen it in many pictures of retired pro riders.
I wondered about that too. I'd love to see the facts behind that comment.
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Old 09-09-21, 07:43 AM
  #57  
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The problem with threads like his is the OP is looking for someone to change a generally negative opinion on carbon frames and/or reinforce his positive opinion on steel frames. Probably not gonna happen when the pro-carbon frame people get their hackles up for whatever reason.

I bought a Domane because my old aluminum bike was a bit harsh, a bit old and I wanted fancy new tech. I can afford it. Maybe a fancy custom steel bike would have been cycling nirvana. I wouldn't know. It was either carbon or Ti and I found the Domane in my size within driving distance.

I ride alone and for my own reasons, I do ask for hints and help on online forums as I don't know about some things, esp modern things. I am probably doing everything wrong but ya know what ..... I am riding .... alot.

To the OP , get an older carbon bike, stick with steel, buy Ti. Carbon people will tell you Carbon is great which doesn't fit your mind set.

A great example....I think my Domane is the best road bike I have ridden. Maybe I just don't know any better. All my steel bikes were in the 80s.
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Old 09-09-21, 08:09 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
This is the reason why when pro racers retires and are not forced to ride carbon, they go for steel.
I'm sure that many older retired pro racers ride steel; why not? Frame material matters little or nothing in how a bike rides, and they grew up idolizing earlier pros, who rode on steel almost exclusively. Weight doesn't matter if you're not racing.

Andy Hampsten rides titanium; so does Chris Horner. In Horner's case, he said in one of his videos that he chose titanium primarily because of its resistance to scratching, a big factor for him, since he travels a lot.

One counter-example is that of Miguel Indurain, who retired from the Banesto/Pinarello team before his contract ended. In a fit of misjudged pique, Pinarello demanded the return of his bikes. So he asked around the peleton for suggestions of what bike to buy. The bikes recommended most frequently were Colnago and Cannondale. He bought a Cannondale. (I mentioned having read this story to our Cannondale rep during a visit to the shop; he laughed and said, "We'd have given him one if he'd asked!")
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Old 09-09-21, 10:02 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
This is the reason why when pro racers retires and are not forced to ride carbon, they go for steel.
I know a few retired pro riders, and they all ride carbon bikes. And, every former pro I've encountered at Gran Fondos, charity events, etc. were all on carbon bikes.
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Old 09-09-21, 10:14 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by gregario View Post
Fair point. I want to know what I'm missing. Also, buying an off the shelf carbon bike would be easier, more resistant to corrosion, possibly lighter and stiffer. That's the short answer.
There's also such a thing as over-built, heavier than necessary carbon.
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Old 09-09-21, 10:23 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by gregario View Post
Good idea, but the Seven sizing is rather unusual. For example, the head tube is 25.5cm, top tube 58.1cm. Finding a stock sized bike close to that is tough, and those are usually "endurance" fit. I guess what I'll do it go with another custom steel, thinking Co-Motion.

This is where translating different fitting guidelines into Stack, Reach, and Setback can be useful. It cuts across a lot of the geometric special points that some manufacturers have, and helps you try to focus on "can I get my contact points where I like them (for example, using your Seven as a model) with the available or parts-on-hand range of bars, stems, seatposts, and saddles?"
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Old 09-09-21, 10:32 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
I have had a few steel bikes that rode with all the compliance and liveliness of an oak log. It shouldn't be too hard to make a carbon bike feel the same.
Clyde, you've just talked him out of buying my Schwinn Varsity! Thanks a lot, Brother!!! {{{{}}}}

Was working out the pitch that it's the Chicago version of a California Masi!
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Old 09-10-21, 09:02 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
Frame material matters little or nothing in how a bike rides,
That has not been my experience. I grew up on steel, my last one being a MAZA (not Masi) Prestige which was Columbus TSX. My current GURU Sidero (steel) is very different from any other steel bike I've owned. I currently ride that GURU and a CAAD 12. I love them both but they do have a different feel that I attribute to frame material.
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Old 09-10-21, 10:40 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by cyclezen View Post
If you like steel, stay with steel.
.
My Favorite? The Spec Tarmac Expert - awesome - would be the one bike, if I could only have one...
ri
I had the same impression of my S-Works Tarmac . Its more comfortable than steel, but when its time to put the hammer down, has virtually no discernible flex. That is a higher end carbon bicycle, to be sure. My experience with a lower priced Carbon Cannondale Synapse (the Shimano 105 grade version ) was not as favorable. That bike had the wooden feel a lot of others on here report
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