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A couple of things I dont understand

Old 09-14-21, 07:21 PM
  #51  
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As I get older My

"Pre-Flight Check List"

gets longer. Yes, I check and double check my tires air pressure. Not only do I give them a squeeze but I also check squeeze my spokes or give um a ping. My tool kit is smaller than it used to be but I am able to carry more tools. Thank goodness for some of the multi-tool gizmos and of course my Park MT-1. Also, I have always been interested in what others carry in their kits. Most often my tool kit use has been for the benefit of others who did not bother bringing thier own.
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Old 09-14-21, 10:53 PM
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I don’t get the whole “I Carry Every Tool I Own “
I don’t do unsupported touring in the backcountry, so I don’t need to do major repairs by the side of the road. Usually what I’m more concerned with is a crash, and things like brake levers and stems are typically handled with a 5mm hex key.

You only need to have on gear and one brake to have a rideable bike, so it’s more about getting any broken parts out of the way than making it ‘perfect.’


About the only spares I carry are a chain tool and a quick link if I have to lop off a busted RD and make it a single speed to get home.
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Old 09-15-21, 04:44 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Random11 View Post
I pump up my tires once a week. Put 80 psi in them, and a week later they are down to 70 psi when I pump them back up to 80. I do squeeze them before I ride to make sure they're OK. If I have a flat, I'll walk the bike home and deal with it there. I know that's what I'd do if I flatted... because I've done it many times.
What's the upper hand in walking back for miles dragging a flatted bike, when at home you'd have to spend the exact same time to fix the same issue you can fix roadside? Apart from being able to wash hands sooner I suppose?
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Old 09-15-21, 05:12 AM
  #54  
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I carry the minimum amount of tools that allow me to fix 99% of the flats/mechanicals I've had in the last 3 decades. Those tools include:-

Micro multi-tool (inc. chain link breaker and tyre lever)
Spare chain links
Spare valve cores
Dynaplug Racer tubeless repair tool
Mini-pump
Spare tube, patches and boot
Disposable gloves

All goes in my jersey pockets and a tiny saddle pack.
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Old 09-15-21, 06:28 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by gigadeath View Post
What's the upper hand in walking back for miles dragging a flatted bike, when at home you'd have to spend the exact same time to fix the same issue you can fix roadside? Apart from being able to wash hands sooner I suppose?
Maybe he flats so infrequently that walking back once every few years is preferable to always carrying an extra three pounds of tools.
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Old 09-15-21, 06:34 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Maybe he flats so infrequently that walking back once every few years is preferable to always carrying an extra three pounds of tools.
Also, if he rides within a short radius from home, this really isn't a big deal.

This calculation is going to be different for everyone. I couldn't do it because my distances are too great to plausibly walk in a day..
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Old 09-15-21, 06:50 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
I don’t get the whole “I Carry Every Tool I Own “
I don’t do unsupported touring in the backcountry, so I don’t need to do major repairs by the side of the road. Usually what I’m more concerned with is a crash, and things like brake levers and stems are typically handled with a 5mm hex key.

You only need to have on gear and one brake to have a rideable bike, so it’s more about getting any broken parts out of the way than making it ‘perfect.’

About the only spares I carry are a chain tool and a quick link if I have to lop off a busted RD and make it a single speed to get home.
A few quick links, a multi-tool with all the popular allen wrenches and some box wrenches, flat and phillips an sometimes Torx .... a couple tubes, tire levers, boots ..... As you say, we don't usually need to do major repairs.
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Old 09-15-21, 07:37 AM
  #58  
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Yep, I check pressure before most rides.

I also carry a lot of tools, because that is what I want on my long and remote rides, and I have little inclination to thin it out on short rides. Easier just to leave it all in there. Also, I often ride with folks who have mechanicals.

As far as the cell phone replacing tools..... that's just weak. "Hi, can you drop what you are doing and take an hour or two out of your day to come pick me up? I know this is inconvenient, but it saves me from carrying 6 oz worth of tools in a saddle bag"

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Old 09-15-21, 07:39 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Maybe he flats so infrequently that walking back once every few years is preferable to always carrying an extra three pounds of tools.
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Also, if he rides within a short radius from home, this really isn't a big deal.

This calculation is going to be different for everyone. I couldn't do it because my distances are too great to plausibly walk in a day..
At like average walking speed (with a bike) of 2.5 miles per hours, it's impossible to have meaningful time on a bike and still stay within 2 hours of walking, when/if flatting. Unless the bike is only used to buy bread at the corner shop

But I know you all are joking, since I consider tube+co2+inflator the minimal, MINIMAL carriage for any cyclist. It's like what, 10 ounces?

Have respect for your wives - brothers - friends
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Old 09-15-21, 08:02 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by gigadeath View Post
At like average walking speed (with a bike) of 2.5 miles per hours, it's impossible to have meaningful time on a bike and still stay within 2 hours of walking, when/if flatting. Unless the bike is only used to buy bread at the corner shop

But I know you all are joking, since I consider tube+co2+inflator the minimal, MINIMAL carriage for any cyclist. It's like what, 10 ounces?

Have respect for your wives - brothers - friends
No, not joking. You just don't seem to have the ability to see beyond your own circumstances and sensibilities.

While *I* wouldn't go without minimal tools to address common problems, I regularly get out for long rides far from home, I can see how someone could get along without.

I happen to live less than half a mile from a lake with a bike path. Lots of people seem happy to cruise that ~3 mile loop a handful of times. Others get more adventurous and include the one or two of the adjacent and connected lake paths. Those even more adventurous can take advantage of the full length of the Grand Rounds chain of paths, which is 50+ miles. Once on the paths, there's exceptionally little concern of debris that might cause a puncture and it's probably be tough to be more than 10 miles from your start point at any given time.

Again, your sensibilities are not universal and your conditions are not universal so why wouldn't methods in which someone addresses a problem suit them instead of suiting you?
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Old 09-15-21, 08:09 AM
  #61  
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AAA will come out and pick you up and your bike - up to 100 miles away
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Old 09-15-21, 08:26 AM
  #62  
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Passed a guy on my ride yesterday fixing a flat, very wooded part of the MUP, he was gonna be awhile, most of his time was being spent swatting mosquitoes. Me, I would have carried the bike the half mile to the road, and respecting my wives-brother-friends, it was early, called Uber. I can use my multi-tool to quickly strip my bike, so as to fit in any Uber vehicle.
Actually I enjoy a call, to help out a cycling friend. A laugh and some beer is always good!

Back to the point, I always check tire pressure before every ride, but cell phone and a multi-tool for kit, is about it. Although would carry appropriate spares if cell phone coverage in doubt, but my normal route, no issues.
I ride in pretty nice areas, one flat in the last 5 years, not that worried about it.
I’m sure most on this forum do what works for them, depending on where and how they ride, why get bent out of shape over it, who really cares!
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Old 09-15-21, 08:50 AM
  #63  
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I ride 3-4 days per week sometimes 5 between my mountain bike and road bike. I check tire pressures about every 3 weeks. I always carry tools and tube/pump in case of flat.
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Old 09-15-21, 08:53 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by gigadeath View Post
At like average walking speed (with a bike) of 2.5 miles per hours, it's impossible to have meaningful time on a bike and still stay within 2 hours of walking, when/if flatting. Unless the bike is only used to buy bread at the corner shop

But I know you all are joking, since I consider tube+co2+inflator the minimal, MINIMAL carriage for any cyclist. It's like what, 10 ounces?

Have respect for your wives - brothers - friends

You're actually quite wrong about the impossibility thing. The people who set long distance riding records (x miles in a year for example) often do it by riding a fairly tight circle (diameter of, say, 4 miles) around their homes. It's an extremely efficient way of piling up miles (it makes all sorts of pit stops/bail outs very easy). A few people have posted on BF describing how they do this to ride an otherwise incredible number of miles. It would, however, drive me absolutely nuts with the monotony. I consider myself a pretty slow walker, and I can definitely cover at least 3 miles in an hour, so they're never more than an hour walk from their homes on such a route.

I ride equipped, my long routes are typically a fairly straight line for 50 miles out, and then come back the same way. I think most people have figured out what's appropriate for them, at least after the first time they flat en route.

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Old 09-15-21, 09:00 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Not many cyclists seem to realize that the cell phone is a master mechanics' device, capable of dealing with almost every bicycle-related situation -- apparently.
Uh---------------------apparently you think the person you call should drop everything and come to your rescue, because you are not responsible enough to carry at least a minimum of tubes and tools.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:02 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
I don’t get the whole “I Carry Every Tool I Own “
I don’t do unsupported touring in the backcountry, so I don’t need to do major repairs by the side of the road. Usually what I’m more concerned with is a crash, and things like brake levers and stems are typically handled with a 5mm hex key.
I don’t carry “every tool I own”. I just carry the tools that I find I need. I have 9 bikes and they have a plethora of bolt sizes and types. I have stems that need 5, 4, and even 3mm allen keys for the stems and seat posts. I have brake levers and shift levers that use torx bolts while others use allen bolts. Even the allen bolts can be different sizes with some using 4mm and some using 5mm. Since I don’t know which bike I might use until I leave the house on any given ride, I carry tools to cover the range rather than have to pack a different tool kit for each bike. The only bike that gets its own tool kit is my fast road bike which I often (but not always) ride without a Camelbak.

You only need to have on gear and one brake to have a rideable bike, so it’s more about getting any broken parts out of the way than making it ‘perfect.’
Yup. But just getting those broken parts out of the way takes a fair number of tools. For example, turning a bike into a single speed requires a chain tool (part of my kit), a quick link, and, probably, a quick link plier to open and close the link. All the tools and other items shown in my picture I have had need “just to get the bike home” at one point or another...with the exception of the chain tool. I’ve never used it on the road.


About the only spares I carry are a chain tool and a quick link if I have to lop off a busted RD and make it a single speed to get home.
The only spare parts I carry are tubes and some bolts. I’ve seldom had a bolt come loose but it has happened. Even when I tour in remote areas, I don’t carry any more spare parts than that. Never found a need for carrying a cable or a spare tire.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:04 AM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by rsbob View Post
Is the OP’s question sincere? Or, is it a PSA on what he feels is the ‘right’ thing to do?

I don’t know how he knows if people do or do not air their tires.

How does he not know that many people keep their tools in a small wrap that they fit in a jersey pocket - so is virtually invisible?

Because you are on this forum, the chances are good you do at least one of the recommendations.

Believe the recommendation above to not care what others do, or don’t do, is spot on.

Perhaps he is being sincere, but if that’s the case, there is so much to question about why humans choose to do one thing over another, believe in one thing, or chose to be mean versus helpful, the questions could go on forever.
Uh---------------------------I know this from what I see on videos, and the countless times I have stopped and helped people that carry nothing.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:08 AM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
The next thread will be about why some cyclists don't eat anything when they ride, all because the OP doesn't see any food in cycling videos.
I observe the people riding, and I can assure you they dont need extra food. Care to talk about recumbent cyclist with beards and aero bellies.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
As I get older My

"Pre-Flight Check List"

gets longer. Yes, I check and double check my tires air pressure. Not only do I give them a squeeze but I also check squeeze my spokes or give um a ping. My tool kit is smaller than it used to be but I am able to carry more tools. Thank goodness for some of the multi-tool gizmos and of course my Park MT-1. Also, I have always been interested in what others carry in their kits. Most often my tool kit use has been for the benefit of others who did not bother bringing thier own.
Great points. And maybe too that since I used to be a pilot, we ALWAYS did a pre-flight.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by gigadeath View Post
What's the upper hand in walking back for miles dragging a flatted bike, when at home you'd have to spend the exact same time to fix the same issue you can fix roadside? Apart from being able to wash hands sooner I suppose?
BTW I even carry a small bottle of alcohol to wash my hands if I get grease on them. The complete cyclist!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 09-15-21, 09:18 AM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Yep, I check pressure before most rides.

I also carry a lot of tools, because that is what I want on my long and remote rides, and I have little inclination to thin it out on short rides. Easier just to leave it all in there. Also, I often ride with folks who have mechanicals.

As far as the cell phone replacing tools..... that's just weak. "Hi, can you drop what you are doing and take an hour or two out of your day to come pick me up? I know this is inconvenient, but it saves me from carrying 6 oz worth of tools in a saddle bag"
Back when I started the modern era of touring (2003 but I toured extensively in the early 80s), people always asked me how I could go touring without a cell phone. “But what if something happens while you are out there?”, was a variant of the questions that were asked of me. I can imagine how such a phone call would go:

”Honey, I’m broken down. Can you come get me?”

”Where are you?”

”I’m about 70 miles north of Bluefield, WV.”

”So you are saying you want me to drive 1500 miles to pick you up?”

“Yea.”

”CLICK!”

”Honey? Honey?”

I did once call when my daughter and I underestimated the time, food, and water needed for a remote mountain bike ride. We were cold, tired, and hungry as well as looking at the possibility of spending a night on the side of a mountain. But my call…when we got a signal… was only to have her call the authorities if she didn’t hear from us by a certain time. Thankfully, we worked our way out of the woods before she had to call them.
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Old 09-15-21, 09:34 AM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I don’t carry “every tool I own”. I just carry the tools that I find I need.
Do you carry a crock pot on long trips so you can re-wax your chain?
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Old 09-15-21, 09:54 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
Do you carry a crock pot on long trips so you can re-wax your chain?
Toting the mini crock of the easy bit, it's getting the wax up to temp with the dynamo that's a pain.
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Old 09-15-21, 11:02 AM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Uh---------------------apparently you think the person you call should drop everything and come to your rescue, because you are not responsible enough to carry at least a minimum of tubes and tools.
Rydabent ..... I wish you had not been one of the people to pile on. I used to respect you despite the fact that you don't ride a real bicycle ......

Imagine if you had bothered to read the thread?

Post #57
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
A few quick links, a multi-tool with all the popular allen wrenches and some box wrenches, flat and phillips an sometimes Torx .... a couple tubes, tire levers, boots ..... As you say, we don't usually need to do major repairs.
Post #14 (As in, Fourteen---apparently you posted and then skipped to the end and took your cheap shot)

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Pretty much every time I get a bike off the rack I bounce it a little to see what rattles, and press the tubes with a thumb or finger. If I have ridden it the day before, that it all, as a rule. If it has been on the rack for some time I do a safety routine---squeeze the brakes, bounce front, rear, and whole bike, shake the bars, shake the cranks, maybe wobble the wheels, and squeeze the tires. I don't tend to lose enough air overnight to have to add any every day ... not sure I could tell 93 psi from 95 psi.

Since I don't have a support staff, I carry tubes, tools, food, pump, anything which might help me get home in about 95% of situations. I have had to walk home a few times, but surprisingly few .... and since I don't have a go-to "Call of shame" recipient I definitely would rather fix it roadside.
As for the rest who have posted disparaging remarks because you failed both to read the thread and understand obvious (at least, obvious to people who had bothered to read the thread) sarcasm …. Yeah, you all meet the BF Standard. Not sure if I can congratulate you for that …..
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Old 09-15-21, 11:03 AM
  #75  
kahn
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Join Date: May 2005
Location: northWET washington
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Yep, I check pressure before most rides.

I also carry a lot of tools, because that is what I want on my long and remote rides, and I have little inclination to thin it out on short rides. Easier just to leave it all in there. Also, I often ride with folks who have mechanicals.

As far as the cell phone replacing tools..... that's just weak. "Hi, can you drop what you are doing and take an hour or two out of your day to come pick me up? I know this is inconvenient, but it saves me from carrying 6 oz worth of tools in a saddle bag"
Although, I did just that about two weeks ago. The last person or Olympic weight lifter who tightened my rear through-axle did a fantastic job. I got a gashed tire (I might have been able to boot it) but could not get the through-axle loosened. I cursed, prodded and bent a tire level in futile attempts to get the thing loose. I even took off my bike shoe and tried using it as a hammer. It required a decent sized rubber mallet's 2-3 good hits to move it.

I now understand AAA might come to the rescue. Or the appropriate Lyft/Uber car???
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