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-   -   Where is it likely a hole in the wall used bike shop gets their inventory? (https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/1241751-where-likely-hole-wall-used-bike-shop-gets-their-inventory.html)

Sy Reene 11-10-21 06:11 AM


Originally Posted by Rolla (Post 22302101)
And most will quickly realize that to actually litigate a liability case against someone who sold them a used bike is expensive, time-consuming, and seldom yields the outcome they fantasize about. Typically, purchases of used goods from private parties are "as is," and the buyer assumes all responsibility. Any shop selling bikes, whether new or used, is probably smart enough to carry commercial general and/or product liability insurance; it isn't very expensive.

Yeah, not sure. You buy a bike from an ebay seller with 500+ ratings (doesn't even have to be all or mostly bike sales). Is that seller a private party or a business?
Random example, this bike:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/36361643670...YAAOSwIuNhi0p3

Rolla 11-10-21 10:30 AM


Originally Posted by Sy Reene (Post 22302345)
You buy a bike from an ebay seller with 500+ ratings (doesn't even have to be all or mostly bike sales). Is that seller a private party or a business?

Whether or not you are a "business" isn't determined by the number of sales you make. It's usually determined by whether you are selling items you have purchased for the purpose of reselling, or making items in order to sell them. If you are a business under those circumstances you should buy product liability insurance.

But Ironfish653, the poster you warned of possible lawsuits, stated that he "just sells the occasional bike from time to time," which makes him a private party selling "as is," and thus the buyer assumes responsibility.

Sy Reene 11-10-21 10:35 AM


Originally Posted by Rolla (Post 22302638)
Whether or not you are a "business" isn't determined by the number of sales you make. It's usually determined by whether you are selling items you have purchased for the purpose of reselling, or making items in order to sell them. If you are a business under those circumstances you should buy product liability insurance.

But Ironfish653, the poster you warned of possible lawsuits, stated that he "just sells the occasional bike from time to time," which makes him a private party selling "as is," and thus the buyer assumes responsibility.

Not sure. He uses the phrase 'flipping' and doing so to raise funds for other ventures. That sounds like a profit-making enterprise. Is this a business? I have no idea how this would be viewed in court if one of those flipped bikes had the brakes fail and the buyer ends up in traction for 6 months. All of course hypothetical -- all I'm suggesting is to be wary.

Rolla 11-10-21 10:43 AM


Originally Posted by Sy Reene (Post 22302648)
Not sure. He uses the phrase 'flipping' and doing so to raise funds for other ventures. That sounds like a profit-making enterprise. Is this a business? I have no idea how this would be viewed in court if one of those flipped bikes had the brakes fail and the buyer ends up in traction for 6 months. All of course hypothetical -- all I'm suggesting is to be wary.

And all I'm suggesting is that it's a lot easier to file a lawsuit than it is to win one.

ClydeClydeson 11-10-21 10:50 AM

Rent a storefront and put a sign that says 'USED BIKES' above the door, and you will quickly have many people bringing you their unwanted bikes to sell. Some might be stolen, but second hand/thrift shops often have some policy in place to prevent this, such as requiring IDs for people selling their bikes, or working with local police to find bikes that have been reported stolen. Other stores may have lots of stolen bikes in stock and the owners are perfectly happy existing as evil sleazebags.

Another place to get used bikes is police auctions, although buying a lot of 25 bikes from a police auction may or may not get you a single ridable bike - most wind up in the custody of police after they are abandoned, and ridable bikes are seldom abandoned. Most bodies of water near cities will also give up untold numbers of bikes if dredged, and you definitely don't want a bike retrieved from the bottom of the ocean.

2old 11-10-21 10:58 AM

There'a a co-op in my burg that has a ton of used bikes for sale as well as new and old parts. They have about four or so mechanics working there at all times too. AFAIK, everything used is donated. Some bikes are repaired and sold, some broken down and sold as parts. Wouldn't take much to get a store like that going IMO.

Calsun 11-10-21 01:34 PM

There were many such shops until Wal-Mart entered the market with cheap bikes from China. Most of the people I have dealt with are extremely reluctant to sell anything on Craigslist and have strangers come to their house. Others cannot be bothered and will sell it to a used bike shop or gift it to a charity. We have millions of Americans who can barely afford rent and food much less the expense of an automobile and cheap bicycles are very much a necessity for them and not a hobby.


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