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Will my new bike take my weight or should I return it ?

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Will my new bike take my weight or should I return it ?

Old 12-18-21, 10:49 AM
  #26  
cyclezen
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Great Bike! Really Fine setup, looks just right for your longterm adventure!
What everyone has said so far - I'll add one thing
Your Butt will likely hurt quite a bit for a week or two after your first few days/rides.
Normal !!!
It's takes from day 3/4 until about day 10/12 for your butt to adjust to doing this new service...
you will prolly come back here, asking for suggestions on a new saddle... LOL!
resist until day 14... it will get better, and your butt will adapt. give it time.
It may be that a different saddle may be in order, down the road, but work through that 'break-in' period before starting that search.
also, try to not have too many day gap between rides. The shorter the gap time/days, the quicker your butt and legs will adapt to riding.
ride 2/3 days in row, then take a day off if you want, then 2/3 days again... and so on.
start easy, get comfortable with bike handling. Use routes where you can focus on things, like shifting, tightening turns, etc. Where traffic is at a minimum.
don;t look straight down at your front wheel - try to look 10-15 yds ahead to anticipate what's ahead.
enjoy the ride!
Huge Kudos to your partner for thinking of cycling and such a great job in choosing the bike and to you for giving a go and making it a part of your Life!
Ride On
Yuri
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Old 12-19-21, 12:48 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Pray you have 36 pokes on the rear wheel.

One item you need to upgrade RIGHT AWAY is the seat post. You'll need the strongest STEEL or ALUMINUM seatpost around 500mm length. Definitely avoid carbon fiber seat post.

A shorter post at your weight will risk damaging your bike's seat tube and anything but the strongest metal seatpost will bend easily when you hit potholes with your weight.


Sorry, but the seatpost stuff is nonsense. The OP doesn't identify the seat post, but as a person who has ridden at that weight, I'm sure the stock seatpost will likely be fine. It really is the wheels that take the stress on potholes.

36 spokes may or may not be necessary, depends a lot on the roads. I'd try it stock then replace the wheel if it can't stay true. It'll be a series of broken spokes at worst, nothing sudden and catastrophic.

Let's not discourage the OP by making up "mandatory" upgrades.

Last edited by livedarklions; 12-19-21 at 12:51 PM.
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Old 12-19-21, 12:54 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Pray you have 36 pokes on the rear wheel.

One item you need to upgrade RIGHT AWAY is the seat post. You'll need the strongest STEEL or ALUMINUM seatpost around 500mm length. Definitely avoid carbon fiber seat post.

A shorter post at your weight will risk damaging your bike's seat tube and anything but the strongest metal seatpost will bend easily when you hit potholes with your weight.
I rode a carbon post when I was close to 300, and it was on a road bike with a 200mm post and narrow wheels with 23mm tire pumped up to 120 psi. Seat post on the bike is fine.

Edit, I've also ridden 24 and 28 spoke on the rear wheels without issues, but I would say 28 on the rear would be minimum spoke until some weight comes off.
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Old 12-19-21, 01:03 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr View Post
I rode a carbon post when I was close to 300, and it was on a road bike with a 200mm post and narrow wheels with 23mm tire pumped up to 120 psi. Seat post on the bike is fine.

Edit, I've also ridden 24 and 28 spoke wheels without issues, but I would say 28 on the rear would be minimum spoke until some weight comes off.

24 could work, depends on the wheel and the roads. Some of the lower end wheels are somewhat overbuilt since they dont worry much about weight at that price point.

​​​​​​
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Old 12-19-21, 06:47 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Sorry, but the seatpost stuff is nonsense. .
Yep.
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Old 12-19-21, 09:15 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
<SNIP>
OP should ...<SNIP>.
The OP should ride the bike, and enjoy themselves.
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Old 12-19-21, 10:11 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
The OP should ride the bike, and enjoy themselves.
Yeah, this pretty much sums it up. Cycling in and of itself won't help you to lose weight if that's your goal. Only maintaining calorie debt will do that. Just don't take the fun out of it for yourself.
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Old 12-20-21, 05:39 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
True. I got broad-sided once by a motorcycle and hit my dirt cheap rear wheel. The wheel didn't get taco'ed. I got several bent spokes though but the wheel was only slightly out of true after the collision. No rub anywhere so I kept riding that wheel for 8 months, including loaded riding with 40 lbs of grocery on the rear rack over bumpy roads. After 8 months, the wheel stayed the same, no deterioration. Cheap wheels tend to have >32 spokes anyway so all good, hopefully.

The one problem with cheap wheel, the axle is easier to bend, worst, if you have freewheel, it's real easy to get bent. I bent mine falling over big potholes at low speed and I only weigh 130 lbs. I never damaged the rims, tires, nor the spokes falling over big potholes. Just the axle. Cheap wheels also have fragile hub body. Easy to damage the splines so OP must learn how to pedal and shift smoothly (soft-pedal when shifting).

OP should check for signs of damage on the rear wheel and get it replaced (whole rear wheel) as soon as he bends the axle. Also he might have to avoid getting the rear wheel perfectly true. I read somewhere, if you have to make a wheel perfectly true, the spoke tension won't be uniform and would be less ideal for loaded riding. Priority for loaded riding is correct spoke tension than being perfectly true.

50+ years of riding, much of it heavy or carrying a lot of weight on the rear wheel, and I've never once seen a bent axle. It sounds like you're basing this on one freak accident that obviously had nothing to do with your weight. Just stop.
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Old 12-20-21, 08:25 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
50+ years of riding, much of it heavy or carrying a lot of weight on the rear wheel, and I've never once seen a bent axle..
If you've never seen a bent axle, you either have very limited experience working on bikes, or you are not very observant. Sure, bent axles are much less common on modern freehub wheels, but bent axles on cheap and old freewheel equipped bikes (even good quality bikes) were very common. Perhaps you've never had a bent axle, but (to paraphrase you) It sounds like you're basing this on your own experience, and cannot speak for any larger population of bikes or bikers.
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Old 12-20-21, 09:16 AM
  #35  
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OP should be fine on this bike. FYI, 23 stone is 322 lbs. I used to weigh much more than this and only issue I had was with the 32 spoke wheels.

The rear wheel on the Specialized Crosstrail I used to own was 17mm wide and those didn't last long. So yea, that thin of a 32 spoke wheel is not meant for heavier riders.

If your 32 spoke wheels are 20mm or greater in width, you "should" be ok with the 40mm tires.......
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Old 12-20-21, 09:16 AM
  #36  
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Listen to the bike.

Originally Posted by dgrhddan View Post
hi guys and girls
My partner bought me a bike as a gift and im worried my weight will break or effect the bikes parts, the main reason i wanted a bike was to loose weight
i contacted the shop and they said the bike should be able to hold up to 20 stone and i am 23 stone so the question is should i return the bike and look for another one? the specs of the bike are below

Frame: 6061 heat treated aluminium
Fork: 63mm travel SR Suntour SF20-NEX -RS 700C w/preload adjuster
Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-TX800-TS6
Rear Derailleur: Shimano RD-TX800
Shifters: Shimano Altus SL-M315
Speed: 24
Crankset: 48T/38T/28T alloy crankset w/ 73-122mm bottom bracket
Cassette: 11-32T 8 speed cassette
Chain: KMC Z-8.3 8 speed chain
Brakes: Clarks Cloud hydraulic disc brakes
Tyres: WTB Nano Comp 700x40C
Pedals: Included

thanks for any advice in Advance
Listen to the bike. I have had three different catastrophic failures that were preceded by a loud snapping sound. The first two times I did not know that is was the bike breaking. The first time a bolt holding the handle bars on broke and the second time the handle bars snapped off resulting in a crash that caused some serious injuries. The third time the frame cracked under the seat and I got right off at the sound of the crack. I ride my bikes over 5000 miles per year and I weight abound 220 pounds. This is not meant to scare anyone but just be mindful that things can break.
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Old 12-20-21, 10:31 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
The rear wheel on the Specialized Crosstrail I used to own was 17mm wide and those didn't last long. So yea, that thin of a 32 spoke wheel is not meant for heavier riders.
.
My guess is that the width or configuration of your wheel was not the problem, it was just badly built, probably with insufficient spoke tension, or with spokes not properly stress relieved after tensioning. I used to work at a shop that sold Specialized, and rear wheel spoke failures were absolutely not unique to heavier riders - I estimate 50% of all people on a new Crosstrail or Crossroad that actually put in a full season of regular riding would have a wheel failure.

I have been up close to 300 lbs and did a lot of hard riding on any surface you can imagine, and I know from experience that you can get years of use out of a decent quality 32 spoke wheel that is properly built and spokes are properly tensioned and stress relieved.
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Old 12-20-21, 10:47 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
If you've never seen a bent axle, you either have very limited experience working on bikes, or you are not very observant. Sure, bent axles are much less common on modern freehub wheels, but bent axles on cheap and old freewheel equipped bikes (even good quality bikes) were very common. Perhaps you've never had a bent axle, but (to paraphrase you) It sounds like you're basing this on your own experience, and cannot speak for any larger population of bikes or bikers.

No, I don't work on bikes. I also don't think it's necessary to warn the OP about things that used to happen. Get serious, this was very bad advice to the OP.
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Old 12-20-21, 11:57 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
No, I don't work on bikes. I also don't think it's necessary to warn the OP about things that used to happen. Get serious, this was very bad advice to the OP.
It's certainly worth keeping an eye on all the load-bearing parts of the rear wheel for a larger person.
Bent axles still happen. I have a replacement rear axle awaiting installation in the XT hub on my touring bike because the stock cones are wearing unevenly due to a bent axle.

Your confidence in your own flawed perspective on this is a symptom of your problem - you don't know enough to know what you don't know.
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Old 12-20-21, 12:00 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Your biggest issue is going to be wheels, especially rear. You may want to ride the bike a bit and then have the shop true and tension the wheels. The key to it is having the spokes properly tensioned.
+1. Ride the bike for a week or 3 then have the wheels tuned up.
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Old 12-20-21, 12:55 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
It's certainly worth keeping an eye on all the load-bearing parts of the rear wheel for a larger person.
Bent axles still happen. I have a replacement rear axle awaiting installation in the XT hub on my touring bike because the stock cones are wearing unevenly due to a bent axle.

Your confidence in your own flawed perspective on this is a symptom of your problem - you don't know enough to know what you don't know.

So wait--you've managed to ride this touring bike with this bent axle long enough that it's causing the wear of other parts, and this is something the OP should be super-vigilant about and expect will cause him to imminently swap out the back wheel?

Thanks for the lecture, but I think you just proved it's not something that should be high on the OP's list of concerns.
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Old 12-20-21, 01:15 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
So wait--you've managed to ride this touring bike with this bent axle long enough that it's causing the wear of other parts, and this is something the OP should be super-vigilant about and expect will cause him to imminently swap out the back wheel?

Thanks for the lecture, but I think you just proved it's not something that should be high on the OP's list of concerns.
Oh, aren't you clever! I never once said it was a safety issue - that's you moving the goal posts because you can't admit you don't know what you are talking about. Bent axles and broken spokes (common failures on bikes) are generally able to safely get you home after they happen. This doesn't mean that they aren't part failures.

Again, you have no idea what you are talking about. You should stop trying to give answers to people on this topic.

For clarity: I weigh 240lbs. The axle on my Shimano XT freehub bent while riding my touring bike, primarily on paved roads. OP weighs 320 lbs, is getting a bike with less expensive, likely less durable hubs, and will be riding God-only-knows where.

My wheel is currently disassembled because I was having trouble keeping the bearings adjusted - they kept developing play, so I popped it apart and found the axle was bent and the cones wearing unevenly, but have not had a chance to install my new axle and cones.

And, once more - you have no idea what you are talking about. Give up, answer questions in another forum, but don't come here and criticize others' answers when you are so clearly clueless.
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Old 12-20-21, 01:40 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Oh, aren't you clever! I never once said it was a safety issue - that's you moving the goal posts because you can't admit you don't know what you are talking about. Bent axles and broken spokes (common failures on bikes) are generally able to safely get you home after they happen. This doesn't mean that they aren't part failures.

Again, you have no idea what you are talking about. You should stop trying to give answers to people on this topic.

For clarity: I weigh 240lbs. The axle on my Shimano XT freehub bent while riding my touring bike, primarily on paved roads. OP weighs 320 lbs, is getting a bike with less expensive, likely less durable hubs, and will be riding God-only-knows where.

My wheel is currently disassembled because I was having trouble keeping the bearings adjusted - they kept developing play, so I popped it apart and found the axle was bent and the cones wearing unevenly, but have not had a chance to install my new axle and cones.

And, once more - you have no idea what you are talking about. Give up, answer questions in another forum, but don't come here and criticize others' answers when you are so clearly clueless.
You are truly missing the point. The OP has a bike that they can ride. They should ride it, and enjoy it, while watching for issues, like we all should. The OP has been advised to keep an eye on the wheels, and have them serviced, spoked tensioned properly, after riding it a while. I had mine done when I bought it, because I wanted to get them most out of what were machine made rims. The OP can safely ride their bike though, as long as they keep any eye on things, and have them serviced if it becomes an issue.

The point is to encourage the OP to ride their bike. Yes, things may wear, or break with time, but the bike is safe to ride. Lets not take the joy out of the OP's new bike, and activity, that would be pointless, and detrimental.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:02 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Oh, aren't you clever! I never once said it was a safety issue - that's you moving the goal posts because you can't admit you don't know what you are talking about. Bent axles and broken spokes (common failures on bikes) are generally able to safely get you home after they happen. This doesn't mean that they aren't part failures.

Again, you have no idea what you are talking about. You should stop trying to give answers to people on this topic.

For clarity: I weigh 240lbs. The axle on my Shimano XT freehub bent while riding my touring bike, primarily on paved roads. OP weighs 320 lbs, is getting a bike with less expensive, likely less durable hubs, and will be riding God-only-knows where.

My wheel is currently disassembled because I was having trouble keeping the bearings adjusted - they kept developing play, so I popped it apart and found the axle was bent and the cones wearing unevenly, but have not had a chance to install my new axle and cones.

And, once more - you have no idea what you are talking about. Give up, answer questions in another forum, but don't come here and criticize others' answers when you are so clearly clueless.

Zzzzzzz.
I don't think the OP should worry about things that are unlikely to happen and should just ride the bike and get it fixed if something breaks. I was critical of someone coming up with a bunch of unlikely scenarios for bike and wheel failure which really can only discourage OP from trying the bike out. I've never changed that, and I'm not exactly bowled over by the fact that you've managed to break a bicycle in a manner I never have. It's rather ironic that you had to completely disassemble the wheel to figure out that was the problem--are you suggesting OP get the wheel taken apart or is that bicycle novice supposed to do it themself? Point is that it doesn't happen enough that you realized it without disassembling it, and it had obviously been that way for a while if it was wearing other parts noticeably.


I really have no interest in whether or not you think I'm qualified to post on a thread. I think we got past the point where listing the things that theoretically could go wrong was going to be of any help to the OP. I stand by that.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:06 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
You are truly missing the point. The OP has a bike that they can ride. They should ride it, and enjoy it, while watching for issues, like we all should. The OP has been advised to keep an eye on the wheels, and have them serviced, spoked tensioned properly, after riding it a while. I had mine done when I bought it, because I wanted to get them most out of what were machine made rims. The OP can safely ride their bike though, as long as they keep any eye on things, and have them serviced if it becomes an issue.

The point is to encourage the OP to ride their bike. Yes, things may wear, or break with time, but the bike is safe to ride. Lets not take the joy out of the OP's new bike, and activity, that would be pointless, and detrimental.

Now I'm annoyed at how much better you put that than I did.
Why you, I ought to....


say thanks.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:09 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Now I'm annoyed at how much better you put that than I did.
Why you, I ought to....


say thanks.
You're welcome.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:49 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
You are truly missing the point. The OP has a bike that they can ride. They should ride it, and enjoy it, while watching for issues, like we all should. The OP has been advised to keep an eye on the wheels, and have them serviced, spoked tensioned properly, after riding it a while. I had mine done when I bought it, because I wanted to get them most out of what were machine made rims. The OP can safely ride their bike though, as long as they keep any eye on things, and have them serviced if it becomes an issue.

The point is to encourage the OP to ride their bike. Yes, things may wear, or break with time, but the bike is safe to ride. Lets not take the joy out of the OP's new bike, and activity, that would be pointless, and detrimental.
Thanks for the response, but you're wrong. All answers (with a few oddball exceptions) stated "it'll be fine but watch out for the following..."

And the recommendation for if any of those following things should occur? "that happens sometimes,, just get a new one". Nobody said 'axles may bend, so don't bother riding'

I don't know how much experience you have designing and building bikes for, or being, a Clydesdale (heavier) cyclist, but these are the things that come up all the time. The solution many have landed on is to encourage, but include some cautions about possible pitfalls, and explain that they are easy to overcome. The main obstacle to a Clydesdale is not frame and component failure, but becoming discouraged, and surprise mechanical failures, or unnoticed mechanical problems that increase drag and wear and therefore make riding less rewarding, are a very likely source of discouragement, so we think it's worth mentioning them when asked. OP realizes they are bigger than average and may have problems less common among lightweights, and sugar coating and glossing over potential pitfalls is not doing them any favours.
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Old 12-20-21, 02:56 PM
  #48  
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OP hasn't been back. Hopefully he's enjoying his bike and hasn't been impaled on a failed seatpost.
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Old 12-20-21, 03:38 PM
  #49  
travbikeman
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
OP hasn't been back. Hopefully he's enjoying his bike and hasn't been impaled on a failed seatpost.
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Old 12-20-21, 03:59 PM
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livedarklions
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Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Thanks for the response, but you're wrong. All answers (with a few oddball exceptions) stated "it'll be fine but watch out for the following..."
.
Nonsense.
The poster who you have taken umbrage for (more than he is, apparently) was not saying that at all. He started with the OP needing 36 spokes, to immediately replace the seat post, and then ended up implying very strongly that a bent axle was likely and would require changing the wheel. This is not at all "it'll be fine but", it's "put a bunch of money in it now, then risk riding it".

So, yes, I thought the bent axle comment was several bridges too far beyond the "it'll be fine, just fix stuff if and when it breaks".
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