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Is this the best explanation of chain stretch ever?

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Is this the best explanation of chain stretch ever?

Old 01-10-22, 01:31 PM
  #51  
rydabent
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Chains wear out and there is no magic lube that will increase the lifespan of a chain...Chain cleaning is also waste of time and does nothing to increase the lifespan of a chain. ..Just enjoy riding your bike and replace your chain when it's worn out.
Wrong, Using a good lube such as Mobil 1 oil and wiping down your chain before every ride, will greatly extend the life of the chain.

As I have posted before, I get approx 8000 miles out of a chain doing what I said. However I do not ride in salt and snow. I stay inside and keep warm.

Last edited by rydabent; 01-10-22 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 01-10-22, 03:43 PM
  #52  
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I built up a new bike 1 year ago - 11 spd 105 level components with a Shimano chain. At 5k miles I checked it after experiencing some skipping. Both sides of the Park chain checker fell through like a golf ball in the ocean (sorry, best analogy I could think of). When comparing to the new chain to get the right number of links... holy crap the old chain was a lot longer.

That's 5k miles, living in the PNW, riding in all weather. I wipe my chain down and lube it, particularly after rainy rides. No other cleaning.

I just did a 130 mile ride with the new chain, and no skipping. Downshifts were a little delayed but I'm hoping I can adjust that out without screwing up the upshifts. Next time I'll check around 2k and see where things are.
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Old 01-10-22, 04:02 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by KerryIrons View Post
I cannot believe this is a serious post...
Even if he meant there is no magic chain lube they all work the same you only need to ride our Southern AZ deserts on an MTB/gravel bike or my road bikes when we are just off the beach in the summer to know sand/grit is a killer and has to be gotten off the inside of your chain.
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Old 01-10-22, 04:33 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by easyupbug View Post
Even if he meant there is no magic chain lube they all work the same you only need to ride our Southern AZ deserts on an MTB/gravel bike or my road bikes when we are just off the beach in the summer to know sand/grit is a killer and has to be gotten off the inside of your chain.
He'll just tell you that there are no deserts in Toronto, so no one needs to worry about that stuff.
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Old 01-10-22, 05:19 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by KerryIrons View Post
I cannot believe this is a serious post. You don't mention lubrication, so every chain I have ever seen would be seriously rusted in a few months of riding, and the noise would be nearly unbearable. Your claim flies in the face of logic and evidence. Any other completely bogus beliefs you want to share?
Calm down and relax....I never said not to lube your chain, all I said was that I believe that chain cleaning is pointless.
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Old 01-10-22, 05:25 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by Rolla View Post
You seem to be operating under the misconception that people have only ridden their bike in the place they currently live.
It's pretty easy to discern between who is talking from actual experience and who is talking out of their rear.
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Old 01-10-22, 05:27 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
It's pretty easy to discern between who is talking from actual experience and who is talking out of their rear.
I'll take your turd for it.
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Old 01-10-22, 05:33 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
I assume you don't use fender due to icing issue. How about heated fenders? Just flip a switch and the ice melts off the fenders.
Go back and read reply # 31....and no I am not interested in heated fenders because regular fenders have worked very well for me.
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Old 01-10-22, 07:57 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Racing Dan View Post
Best explanation?

Maybe? My take is, knowing what causes elongation should make you Not use a "in between the rollers" chain gauge. Least if elongation is what you want to gauge. If overall wear is what you are after its fine, but just be aware roller wear adds a lot to apparent elongation
A chain checking tool is good enough. Measuring “between the rollers” isn’t going to change the measurement all that much. Even if it threw the measurement off by a little that’ only going to result in a chain being discarded prematurely by a few hundred miles. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Chains aren’t the most expensive part to replace on a bicycle.

From the video it appears as if the chain is "extremely worn" (he says) measured with the park tool gauge, but the same chain measured with the blue ruler shows less than 1/16" elongation in 12". That is at worst 0.5%. That doesn't qualify as Extreme. Not by a long shot.
People really need to RTFM! The 0.75% side doesn’t measure “extreme wear”. From the Park website

The CC-3.2 is a go/no-go gauge designed to accurately indicate when a chain reaches .5% and .75% "stretch," the points at which most chain manufacturers suggest replacement. For 9 and 10-speed chains, replace chain just as the gauge fits the 0.75% side fits flat into the chain. For 11 and 12-speed chain, replace as the 0.5% side fits.
And, again, how much mileage does an extra 1/32” wear equal? 100 miles? 200 miles? 500 miles, maybe? Is the cost of chain so high that you need to squeeze out that mileage? And, on a rule that is marked in 1/16”, how “accurate” is a 1/32” measurement? (Hint: it isn’t.)

Of course we can argue all day if roller wear should be included. I think it should, but implemented in the gauge to account for both true elongation and apparent elongation, to not cause you to prematurely discard the chain.
Why are you so worried about discarding a chain prematurely? If a $20 chain lasts 3000 miles, it cost 0.6¢ per mile. Even an $80 chain is going to only cost 3¢ per mile. On the other hand, if you have to squeeze that last fraction of a cent of value out of the chain, what are the consequences? For a $20 chain, it might cost you a $60 cassette. For an $80 chain on a 10-52 SRAM cassette, it might cost $400 in addition to the new chain. Even at $80 for a chain, it’s cheaper to replace the chain a little too often.
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Old 01-10-22, 09:23 PM
  #60  
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You can argue the semantics, but the results, according to the video, are either 0.75%+ measured with gauge between the rollers or less than 0.5% measured with the ruler. I get the same results measuring worn chains with a shop quality digital calliper. You can decide for yourself if that discrepancy is enough to care about. But, as noted before, it may account for some posting unusual low mileage. Especially if they believe the chain must be replaced when the 0.5% side of the gauge pops in. Or even worse, try to apply the campagnolo 132.6mm measurement to a shimano chain. At that point you are binning a perfectly fine chain. Maybe your budget can absorb that expense, but that is not the point.

Last edited by Racing Dan; 01-10-22 at 09:37 PM.
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Old 01-11-22, 09:47 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
If I have to guess, his chainring is made of steel and thick.

Very thin light weight aluminum big ring is probably the biggest culprit to accelerated drivetrain wear, together with thin aluminum cogs at the cassette. Because aluminum parts wear faster, the chain will also wear faster as a consequence even if the chain is made out of steel.
Aluminum chainrings aren’t all that thin even in 12 speed drivetrains. Chainrings don’t wear all that fast either. An aluminum chainring will outlast several cassettes…5+… and a cassette can outlast 3 to 5 chains. Aluminum cogs on a cassette will wear fast but you won’t find too many examples of aluminum cassettes for just that reason.

And, no, steel chains don’t wear faster if they are used on aluminum parts.

Those thin, very sharp aluminum big ring can also cut your leg. I have cut my legs a few times when I made contact with the big ring while the chain is on the small ring at the traffic stop. That's one reason I converted to 1x. Thin aluminum big ring is dangerous. Additional tetanus / infection hazard if you don't clean your drivetrain.
Maybe you should learn how not to cut your leg on chainrings. In 40+ years of riding…and lots and lots of crashing…I have scraped my leg only a few times. That includes mountain biking where getting off the bike is often more important than worrying about where your leg goes.
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Old 01-11-22, 09:56 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Racing Dan View Post
You can argue the semantics, but the results, according to the video, are either 0.75%+ measured with gauge between the rollers or less than 0.5% measured with the ruler. I get the same results measuring worn chains with a shop quality digital calliper. You can decide for yourself if that discrepancy is enough to care about. But, as noted before, it may account for some posting unusual low mileage. Especially if they believe the chain must be replaced when the 0.5% side of the gauge pops in. Or even worse, try to apply the campagnolo 132.6mm measurement to a shimano chain. At that point you are binning a perfectly fine chain. Maybe your budget can absorb that expense, but that is not the point.
0.5% vs 0.75% is hardly worth worrying about. 0.5% wear is not “a perfectly good chain”. It is a chain that is showing some wear and is well on its way to needing a replacement if it is a 9 speed or below chain and is a worn out chain if it is 10 speed or above. How much more mileage do you think you could squeeze out of that last 0.25%? Wear isn’t linear so if you have 3000 miles on a chain, it’s not going to last another 1500 miles. And, as I pointed out above, you risk having to replace much more expensive parts.

Edit: Upon further consideration, I need to point out that when using the 12” rule, the guidance is to replace when the chain reaches 1/16” stretch. That, as you have pointed out, is about 0.5%. So the chain would have been replaced with either the chain checker or with a ruler. The guidance on using a ruler isn’t that you go to 3/32” which would be the 0.7% chain stretch.
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Old 01-11-22, 11:40 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
I get cut when I'm stopped on intersection when my foot is down on the pavement and near the big ring.
Most people put their NDS foot down.
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Old 01-11-22, 03:00 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Aluminum big ring on mine wore quite fast, even on the sides it became quite sharp. I get cut when I'm stopped on intersection when my foot is down on the pavement and near the big ring. Never when in motion.

I have since switched to 1x drivetrain with thicker steel chainring. Solved the laceration problem entirely and the steel chainring doesn't seem to wear at all which is amazing. It used to be the small ring in my former 2x drivetrain. Have used it for thousands of miles. Steel and thicker makes a huge difference.

I have been using aluminum chainrings at least on the outer ring since 1977. The last bike I had that had steel ring for the outer ring was an early 70s Sear “10 speed”. The only ring I’ve replaced because of wear was a 44 tooth chainring on a mountain bike crank from the late 90s just recently. I’ve ridden bikes for nearly 200,000 miles since 1988 and that’s the only one I’ve ever worn out. I’m not saying that they can’t wear out but it takes a whole to of time to do so in my experience.
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Old 01-11-22, 06:25 PM
  #65  
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