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Climbing Bike?

Old 02-08-22, 10:00 PM
  #51  
seypat
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Maybe the question should be, "Why should you not use a climbing bike if you're not climbing?"
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Old 02-13-22, 12:32 PM
  #52  
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I would instead buy a mountain bike if I were you since it has a lot of weight. Becau

I would instead buy a mountain bike if I were you since it has a lot of weight. Because of this, the depreciation of such bikes is very cool, and it is much more pleasant to ride them in the mountains than on other bikes.
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Old 02-13-22, 11:25 PM
  #53  
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Is it just me, but aren't climbing and descending joined at the hip? I don't understand this "climbing bike" stuff. I guess, maybe an aero frame with deep wheels would be less of a climber than a lighter non-aero frame (increasingly not) and the super light shallow wheels? But is that purpose-built "climbing bike" good if it's unstable at high speed? Anyway, I just ride bikes and don't worry about anything except general overall weight (lighter is better, but not to weenie extent), and fit.
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Old 02-14-22, 01:03 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
I always have a "climbing bike". When you live in the Rockies and can do a 20 + mile continous climb you better believe some of us have our "climbing" bikes. Optimized to keep me most comfortable while basking in the pain of constantly going up.

Of course I don't have a good climbing bike cause I'm not a good climbing but I dang sure have a climbing bike, LOL!

I mean I've taken my old 1985 Opus III with a 42T small ring, DT shifters, etc up long climbs. I can do them for sure on it. But I'd much rather be on my Climbing bike that's 20 years newer, running a triple with a 32T small ring, STI shifters, lighter CF body, more upright bar setup, etc, etc ... There are tools for a job and there are better tools for a job.


I would say a lower geared bike then. But not really a climbing bike as noted by the OP. There are people that are more fit than you and I that could probably out-climb us on a bike that is 5 lbs heavier.
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Old 02-14-22, 01:17 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
Is it just me, but aren't climbing and descending joined at the hip? I don't understand this "climbing bike" stuff. I guess, maybe an aero frame with deep wheels would be less of a climber than a lighter non-aero frame (increasingly not) and the super light shallow wheels? But is that purpose-built "climbing bike" good if it's unstable at high speed? Anyway, I just ride bikes and don't worry about anything except general overall weight (lighter is better, but not to weenie extent), and fit.
Deep section aero wheels are about the last thing you want when descending a mountain at high speed
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Old 02-14-22, 07:09 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
I would say a lower geared bike then. But not really a climbing bike as noted by the OP. There are people that are more fit than you and I that could probably out-climb us on a bike that is 5 lbs heavier.
So much silliness in this thread, LOL!

It's a climbing bike to me, I'll always refer to it as my climbing bike and others can call it whatever they want.
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Old 02-16-22, 06:38 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by TTron View Post
Hi, I have my eye on a climbing bike, Aethos. Does it make sense to buy one, worth the investment, that much of a difference on climbs? I live in a hilly area with plenty of climbs. Current riding a great endurance bike, Sworks Roubaix. No plans to race, just have fun and do personal best times. In short, trying to justify a second bike, a climbing bike. Welcome the feedback.
Personal view is if you are not racing and just riding for recreation, then get the best bike you can afford that makes you happy. Regardless of how quick it is - as others have pointed out, your weight / fitness / training is probably the biggest factor in how quickly you'd get round certain loops.

If you want to spend thousands on multiple bikes, only one of which you can ride at one time - then go for it. If you want to spec up your trusty old steed to make sure it knows it is loved, then go for it.

I was very fortunate to get a 2nd hand Bianchi early in Lockdown, before prices went crazy. I love it and have never seen anything I would want to replace it with. It's very much a decent recreational bike, but given I don't race, it is absolutely great for me and hasn't left a huge hole in my bank account. A bit of bar tape and the odd new tyre and it will be all I need for many years to come.
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Old 02-16-22, 06:50 AM
  #58  
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In terms of the climbing bike discussion... it's worth noting that some of the GC guys in the Pro Cycling world will absolutely change their bike for certain stages.

Not sure if there is much weight they could remove on a Mountain stage, compared to a flat stage given they will already be riding absolute top spec, ultra light. But I know that Froome would put a big chain ring on in order to lay down a bit more power in the descent. So it's really a descending bike, more than a climbing bike... and he probably wouldn't make the change on a mountain finish, only where there is a descent in the final KMs.
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Old 02-16-22, 01:05 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
We are off-topic, but a bike is quite literally not an investment.
Don't be pedantic. An investment does not have to directly increase in monetary value to be understood as an investment. Investment is time, energy, or matter spent in the hope of future benefits actualized within a specified time frame. A bike is quite literally an investment if the benefits (health, entertainment, whatever) are hoped to outweigh the financial cost of owning the bicycle.
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Old 02-16-22, 01:10 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
Don't be pedantic. An investment does not have to directly increase in monetary value to be understood as an investment. Investment is time, energy, or matter spent in the hope of future benefits actualized within a specified time frame. A bike is quite literally an investment if the benefits (health, entertainment, whatever) are hoped to outweigh the financial cost of owning the bicycle.
I get you. But itís pretty much my job to be pedantic about such things. 😉
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Old 02-16-22, 03:00 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
I get you. But itís pretty much my job to be pedantic about such things. 😉
Being pedantic about such things is quite literally not your job.
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Old 02-16-22, 04:33 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
Being pedantic about such things is quite literally not your job.
You are quite literally incorrect.
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Old 02-16-22, 04:36 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
You are quite literally incorrect.
But that ruins the joke.
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Old 02-16-22, 05:04 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
But that ruins the joke.
Or maybe makes it even betterÖ?
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Old 02-16-22, 06:42 PM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by maglia_grigia View Post
In terms of the climbing bike discussion... it's worth noting that some of the GC guys in the Pro Cycling world will absolutely change their bike for certain stages.

Not sure if there is much weight they could remove on a Mountain stage, compared to a flat stage given they will already be riding absolute top spec, ultra light. But I know that Froome would put a big chain ring on in order to lay down a bit more power in the descent. So it's really a descending bike, more than a climbing bike... and he probably wouldn't make the change on a mountain finish, only where there is a descent in the final KMs.
"Absolute top spec", to what? They ride the same groupsets the whole time. It's not like they have a "Dura Ace private limited edition spec just for Movistar".

Also, sprinters might run a 54/42 for a sprint stage but climbers aren't in climbing stages. They're still using 53/39 or maybe swap a smaller inner ring and use the modern 11-30 (gasp!) on the climb stages. Not sure where you get this Froome chainring mess. He ran oval rings a lot with a lot of asymmetry to them, so that can make the large ring look really big......when it isn't. The effective ratio is still the same.

Swapping bikes seems to have stopped being as much a thing some years ago as the Tarmacs and Emondas of the world got aero enough that it made it not necessary to carry around both and a TT bike on the grand tours.
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Old 02-17-22, 03:06 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by burnthesheep View Post
"Absolute top spec", to what? They ride the same groupsets the whole time. It's not like they have a "Dura Ace private limited edition spec just for Movistar".

Also, sprinters might run a 54/42 for a sprint stage but climbers aren't in climbing stages. They're still using 53/39 or maybe swap a smaller inner ring and use the modern 11-30 (gasp!) on the climb stages. Not sure where you get this Froome chainring mess. He ran oval rings a lot with a lot of asymmetry to them, so that can make the large ring look really big......when it isn't. The effective ratio is still the same.

Swapping bikes seems to have stopped being as much a thing some years ago as the Tarmacs and Emondas of the world got aero enough that it made it not necessary to carry around both and a TT bike on the grand tours.
There is probably more incentive these days for amateurs having a more climbing optimised bike. Pros might be able to get their disc braked aero bike down to 6.8 kg by throwing £12k+ at the build, but those bikes can start getting a bit porky once you put cheaper wheels and groupsets on. Then you get bikes like the Aethos that can be built way under the 6.8 kg limit that are no use to a pro.
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