Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Where to start? What bicycle to buy?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Where to start? What bicycle to buy?

Old 03-31-22, 12:49 PM
  #1  
bicycle.journey
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Where to start? What bicycle to buy?

Hello everyone,
I am currently learning to ride a bicycle as an adult I was lent a bike as I learned not even sure what type of bicycle it was. I need to buy a bike now in order to continue learning, I do not understand my riding style YET or anything and I have no clue where to begin as I have not owned a bicycle before. So please cycling enthusiasts lend me some advice on what to buy? or where to begin when buying a bike or which bicycles to research so that I can potentially test out if i go to a bike shop.
Thank you

Further information: My budget is max around 2000 for a bicycle and maybe some important accessories that go along with it so lets just say around 1500 for the bicycle and 500 for the accessories.
  • I am looking for a foldable bicycle (unfortunately where I currently live there is no storage for a full sized bicycle)
  • I will most likely utilise my bicycle, in the beginning, for learning to ride the bicycle and then hopefully progress onto long distances/leisure riding/ touring maybe (so I need to be able to attach storage) and not sure if it will be on road or off road or rough terrain etc, but I preferably want to buy a bike that is suitable for all terrains if that is possible?
  • I may even use the bicycle for commuting to places, buying groceries etc (I do not drive a car and most likely don't want to learn to either, don't want to add pollution haha)
  • A bike that will last me at least 10 years
  • A bike that has low maintenance costs and easy to maintain and not many specialised parts (so that IF i am in a different place it will not be difficult to find such parts)
Also, no misogynistic comments lol, I am adding this info as maybe someone who knows about bikes could possibly steer me in the right direction of what is suitable for my size in bikes.
I am female height is 160cm so almost about 5'3".
My inseam is about 27 inches. I am not overweight and in decent shape but my fitness levels could be better. Hence why I want to buy a bicycle So what type of bicycle do you think I should be looking at?
Also I am from the UK and preferably want to buy a bicycle that is not online but as a last resprt do not mind online but what do i need to look out for if i do buy from an online retailer? and/or if the bicycle is not in stock in-store.

On another note, when I was learning to ride a bicycle I found that the higher gears were easier for me as I felt more in control of the bicycle, not sure why that was? Does anybody have any insight into this?


Thank you for any info and if you read through all this, have a nice day everyone.
bicycle.journey is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 02:12 PM
  #2  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,656

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4305 Post(s)
Liked 2,865 Times in 1,994 Posts
I'd just buy an inexpensive bike. Any bike that strikes you as appealing at the moment you see it and is the proper size for you. Then ride the crud out of it until you know what it doesn't do well and what it does do well.

If you only spend a little, then you'll be able to buy another inexpensive bike when you figure out what the current bike isn't doing well. Once your learning has advanced enough for you to understand fully what you want a bike to do, then you can buy the right bike or bikes to fill your desires.

I can't say that I could recommend any bike to fully satisfy the requirements you are setting out.

Welcome to BF. Hopefully you will get some comments that steer you better to what you might want in a first bike. But don't wait 10 years to get that second bike! <grin>

Also, on the folding thing, consider weight. Though I only imagine that folding bikes are heavy. Maybe there are light ones too. But to me I can't see how a folding bike saves much compared to hanging a bike on the wall or just putting it in an out of the way corner of a room.

Last edited by Iride01; 03-31-22 at 03:36 PM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 02:36 PM
  #3  
katsup
Senior Member
 
katsup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,650

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter v1, Cotic SolarisMax, 1990 Bianchi Grizzly, 1995 ParkPre Pro 825

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 271 Posts
Normally I'd agree with Iride01 , but you want a folder and there is not as many categories with folding bikes.

You kind of have 2 options, a nice folder from a brand like Brompton or Bike Friday. Either should last at least 10 years. Or a cheaper brand that may not last.

Maybe some folding bike experts will chime in as I don't have much experience with them.
katsup is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 03:26 PM
  #4  
Barry2 
LRP=HR
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 1,340

Bikes: Holdsworth 1979 Special, C-dale 1993 MT3000 Tandem & 1996 F700CAD3, Cervelo 2022 R5 & 2018 R3, JustGo Runt, Ridley Oval, Kickr Bike 8-)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 511 Post(s)
Liked 557 Times in 346 Posts
Welcome to BF.

As you've discovered bikes are designed to suit a purpose.
As a generalized split
1. Mountain bikes
1.a. Gravel bikes - Bit of a half way between dirt & Road.
2. Road Bikes
2.a. Commuter bikes (often folding)

But if you look around, you will find bikes that blur the lines a bit.

I can't recommend them, never even seen one, but here is an example....
Flatbike and their folding Road bike plus they offer a folding mountain bike. Go poke around their site, they have others.

I'm sure there must be other manufacturers to choose from in the unique folding bike arena.
You should go ask in the BF "Folding Bikes" forum.

All the best

Barry
Barry2 is online now  
Old 03-31-22, 03:37 PM
  #5  
Kedosto
Callipygian Connoisseur
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,383
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 563 Post(s)
Liked 346 Times in 189 Posts
The folding requirement narrows down the field significantly, but great quality choices remain. I’m not sure if you’re aware, but a folding bike with smaller diameter wheels and tires will handle a bit different than what you may have been learning on. The folder will be more… nimble. I wouldn’t consider the difference in handling a dealbreaker by any means. A quality folding bike can be spec’d and outfitted for any purpose, just like any full sized bicycle.

Folders are gender neutral and typically offer a very wide range of adjustments so fitting your bike will be no trouble either. Your price range is appropriate for a good quality folder, leaving money for the important accessories like a helmet, lock, racks, lights, etc. One important consideration with folding bikes is their weight — not because you’re trying to race or be one of the cool kids, but the premise of a folder is portability and if you’re planning on carrying it up stairs, well, only you know what you can handle.

Brompton, Tern, Dahon, and Bike Friday are good places to start your search.
Kedosto is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 04:13 PM
  #6  
Calsun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 478
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 193 Post(s)
Liked 106 Times in 84 Posts
I would look at the folding bikes from Dahon that has been making them for a great many years. Their D8 has 8 speeds and weighs 28 lbs and fit a rider that is from 4'9" to 6'2" in height. These come with a rear rack and fenders so all you need to add is a head light and a tail light and panniers for groceries and buy yourself a MIPS helmet.

Folding bikes tend to use smaller and lighter and more compact wheels and tires. A full size bike with its front wheel removed can be stored in a relatively small space. Check out the size of the bike boxes at a local bike shop or have them remove the front wheel and then measure how much space is needed. It will not be a great deal more than that needed for a folding bike.

The tires will be OK for road use but may be marginal on dirt. Problem is that with larger dirt tires you have larger and much heavier wheels and a much heavier bike. The folding trail bikes are designed for use by hunters and not what you want to buy.

Any bike will last for many years. The parts that wear can be replaced at low cost and your main expenditure will be for a new tube if it puntures or new tires after several years of use.

No singe bike is going to be ideal for all environments. If you can find a used Dahon bike for sale it would be a good place to start. Buying a used bike you can get your money back out if you decide you want something else.
Calsun is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 04:34 PM
  #7  
RH Clark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 457
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Liked 233 Times in 118 Posts
I would find storage for a full sized bike somehow. I have 2 bikes in my bed room,4 on my fully enclosed back porch and about 6 more in various states on my front porch, so I understand about not enough space. There are devices that allow you to hoist one up against the ceiling if you must, but getting a full sized bike would simplify things considerably. Even if you get a folding bike and want to grocery shop you will need racks and bags that will need to be stored. Get a bike shop to help you get fitted and into a bike that fit how and where you want to ride. As a newby,I suggest something upright with wide tires, something along the line of a step through comfort bike.
RH Clark is online now  
Old 03-31-22, 07:54 PM
  #8  
holytrousers
hoppipola
 
holytrousers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 327

Bikes: fausto coppi

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 384 Post(s)
Liked 174 Times in 123 Posts
Originally Posted by bicycle.journey View Post
Hello everyone,
I am currently learning to ride a bicycle as an adult I was lent a bike as I learned not even sure what type of bicycle it was. I need to buy a bike now in order to continue learning, I do not understand my riding style YET or anything and I have no clue where to begin as I have not owned a bicycle before. So please cycling enthusiasts lend me some advice on what to buy? or where to begin when buying a bike or which bicycles to research so that I can potentially test out if i go to a bike shop.
Thank you

Further information: My budget is max around 2000 for a bicycle and maybe some important accessories that go along with it so lets just say around 1500 for the bicycle and 500 for the accessories.
  • I am looking for a foldable bicycle (unfortunately where I currently live there is no storage for a full sized bicycle)
  • I will most likely utilise my bicycle, in the beginning, for learning to ride the bicycle and then hopefully progress onto long distances/leisure riding/ touring maybe (so I need to be able to attach storage) and not sure if it will be on road or off road or rough terrain etc, but I preferably want to buy a bike that is suitable for all terrains if that is possible?
  • I may even use the bicycle for commuting to places, buying groceries etc (I do not drive a car and most likely don't want to learn to either, don't want to add pollution haha)
  • A bike that will last me at least 10 years
  • A bike that has low maintenance costs and easy to maintain and not many specialised parts (so that IF i am in a different place it will not be difficult to find such parts)
Also, no misogynistic comments lol, I am adding this info as maybe someone who knows about bikes could possibly steer me in the right direction of what is suitable for my size in bikes.
I am female height is 160cm so almost about 5'3".
My inseam is about 27 inches. I am not overweight and in decent shape but my fitness levels could be better. Hence why I want to buy a bicycle So what type of bicycle do you think I should be looking at?
Also I am from the UK and preferably want to buy a bicycle that is not online but as a last resprt do not mind online but what do i need to look out for if i do buy from an online retailer? and/or if the bicycle is not in stock in-store.

On another note, when I was learning to ride a bicycle I found that the higher gears were easier for me as I felt more in control of the bicycle, not sure why that was? Does anybody have any insight into this?


Thank you for any info and if you read through all this, have a nice day everyone.
Your bicycle will come to you, uninvited. The moment you see it, don't miss it.
holytrousers is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 08:22 PM
  #9  
Random11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 346
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 217 Times in 118 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I'd just buy an inexpensive bike...
I agree with this advice. I started riding a bit more than four years ago and wasn't sure exactly what I wanted. The bike I got was fairly well suited to my riding, and the sales person did say it should last me more than ten years. After riding a while, I had a better idea of what I wanted in a bike, so I gave my bike (still in very good condition) to my son and, with more knowledge about bikes by then, bought a bike I like much better. You want a bike to last at least 10 years, but the problem is that you don't really know what bike you want. Next year, knowing more, you may want something different from what you'd buy now. From my own experience, I say don't spend too much money, get a bike to learn both how to ride and how you will use your bike, and a year or two from now you'll be more likely to know what bike to buy that you really will want to ride for 10 years.
Random11 is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 09:19 PM
  #10  
Vintage Schwinn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 534
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 264 Times in 181 Posts
Hello and welcome to bike forums.
Let me say that I know very little about all of the folding bikes that may be out there from past or present day.
I am old enough to remember several Peugeot folding bikes back during the bike boom of the Seventies that really impressed me that they appeared to be extremely well built and were highly functional. Between 1972, 1973 and 1974, I knew several people who rode them. My sister's friend Cristina owned one of these in 1972 and 1973 when she was in college. 1972 was the first time that I ever saw one up close and in action. It was the nicest built folding bike that I have seen to date, but admittedly, I haven't seen too many but there were some Raleighs and STEYR (Austria ) and maybe Royce Unions (from West Germany) and even Schwinn, I think had a folding bike around 1968 but it wasn't very good in my opinion, but heck I don't really remember. I did remember thinking that the old Peugeot folding bikes had a great folding and locking design which others did not have at the time. The engineering appeared to be years ahead of the other brands in terms of the folding frame and its practical use.
I don't really know how or if folding bikes have evolved, or if they have advanced at all since the bike boom when all sorts of new bicycles were in huge demand.

I agree with Iride01 and katsup that you should just buy an inexpensive bike. If you want a folding bike, my guess is that you should be able to find such an ancient Peugeot for hardly nothing. Look around and try to find a clean example, even if it has been sitting unused in someone's basement or garage for nearly forty years.
I do think there is practicality in a folding bike IF the bike is built decent enough to be durable and have adequate gearing. I do believe those ancient Peugeot folding bikes are good at that. It would not cost much to rehabilitate such a bike. Tires might be somewhat difficult to source depending on what actual size was used on those. Other than that, the rear derailleur equipped models DO NOT care really what brand-model rear derailleur as so many inexpensive, easy to source new & used Shimano models and inexpensive used & nos Suntour models will easily fit and function perfectly. This doesn't mean that old Raleigh, STEYR, and other brand folding bikes aren't good choices too. They probably could be. I just don't know too much on folding bikes, but I do recall those old Peugeot models, and they looked to be nicely designed and well-built when I saw them in action about fifty years ago,

Peugeot Folding bike- early 70's?

Peugeot Vintage Folding Bike

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...e-help-id.html

My First New Old Bike - Peugeot DA 40 E

Sort of a Folding Bike (Peugeot)
Vintage Schwinn is offline  
Old 03-31-22, 09:33 PM
  #11  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,641

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 162 Times in 126 Posts
There is a sub-forum devoted to folding bicycles here at Bike Forums https://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bikes/. You will find people who ride folding bikes there and probably know lots more than most of us who do not use them. If you like, a moderator can move your post to that sub-forum.
VegasTriker is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.