Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Buying a good used road bike

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Buying a good used road bike

Old 05-21-22, 03:52 PM
  #51  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,814

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Liked 301 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
Ok, thanks for the overview; I checked online how to translate the 35 inch distance to crossbar and could not find the right metric. It looked better than another with a 32 inch measure.
the 35 inch quoted is 'standover' height to the toptube. My visual guess (and prolly correct) is that it's a 62 cm frame size - which easily covers your size needed for leg length and height - assuming your torso/leg proportions are mid-curve for a population your height. You can ask the owner to measure from the center of the Crank axle, along the seat tube, to the top of the seat tube, to where the seat post is inserted = frame size.
It was a decent general riding bike from the mid 70's and should give a nice ride and has rack bosses on the dropouts. 27" wheels with schraeder valves are NOT the same as 700c (the defacto standard usinf presta valves, for better road bikes) but tires and tubes are widely available in that size.
This would not be a bike worth 'upgrading', use as is and move on if more performance becomes desired.
It is a bicycle, well made, and prolly a bunch of fun to ride. About the same level bike that I started on in '65 (and after a year, upgraded to another bike... LOL!).
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 05-21-22, 07:17 PM
  #52  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by cyclezen View Post
the 35 inch quoted is 'standover' height to the toptube. My visual guess (and prolly correct) is that it's a 62 cm frame size - which easily covers your size needed for leg length and height - assuming your torso/leg proportions are mid-curve for a population your height. You can ask the owner to measure from the center of the Crank axle, along the seat tube, to the top of the seat tube, to where the seat post is inserted = frame size.
It was a decent general riding bike from the mid 70's and should give a nice ride and has rack bosses on the dropouts. 27" wheels with schraeder valves are NOT the same as 700c (the defacto standard usinf presta valves, for better road bikes) but tires and tubes are widely available in that size.
This would not be a bike worth 'upgrading', use as is and move on if more performance becomes desired.
It is a bicycle, well made, and prolly a bunch of fun to ride. About the same level bike that I started on in '65 (and after a year, upgraded to another bike... LOL!).
Ride On
Yuri
Thanks for the overview. I drove the 3 plus hour round-trip, was not impressed by this one but decided the $100 would not be wasted as I could probably sell it for that.

My Univega touring bike was much better than this one, and it does seem small to me. Even after having an accident with the Univega I kept making good use of it.

The positive on this one is that condition is ok, tires probably need to be trued. The guy had it in storage and did not ride it as it was too big.

Probably what I need to keep looking for is the right size, lighter, a quality large bike that someone is upgrading from.
TLit is offline  
Old 05-21-22, 07:39 PM
  #53  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,814

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Liked 301 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
Thanks for the overview. I drove the 3 plus hour round-trip, was not impressed by this one but decided the $100 would not be wasted as I could probably sell it for that.
My Univega touring bike was much better than this one, and it does seem small to me. Even after having an accident with the Univega I kept making good use of it.
The positive on this one is that condition is ok, tires probably need to be trued. The guy had it in storage and did not ride it as it was too big.
Probably what I need to keep looking for is the right size, lighter, a quality large bike that someone is upgrading from.
LOL!, Yes, the bike is quite unimpressive. But as for quality, it will give reliable service and durability if maintained - more than one can say for many of the new Big Box bikes.
It prolly would have sold for $50, 2.5 yrs ago. But in the current supply climate, used prices are incredibly high.
I don;t expect the supply issue to change over the next year.
You can ride, while looking for something better, and expect to get the $100 back in a year.
You might also want to ride 'newer' stuff, and get a feel for what you haven;t experienced yet.
Time on a bike always highlights the important functional things you'd like to improve.

I have quite a bit of old crappage which was Top O Da Line in it's day. I've kept them for sentimental reasons... not reality.
Rode one for most of last week. It was great, and almost as good as I remember it being.
But now very happy to be back on my Carbon Fiber Fliver again - heads above the older machines...
But Riding the Bike is still better than not... no matter the conditions or temps...
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 05-21-22, 07:52 PM
  #54  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by cyclezen View Post
LOL!, Yes, the bike is quite unimpressive. But as for quality, it will give reliable service and durability if maintained - more than one can say for many of the new Big Box bikes.
It prolly would have sold for $50, 2.5 yrs ago. But in the current supply climate, used prices are incredibly high.
I don;t expect the supply issue to change over the next year.
You can ride, while looking for something better, and expect to get the $100 back in a year.
You might also want to ride 'newer' stuff, and get a feel for what you haven;t experienced yet.
Time on a bike always highlights the important functional things you'd like to improve.

I have quite a bit of old crappage which was Top O Da Line in it's day. I've kept them for sentimental reasons... not reality.
Rode one for most of last week. It was great, and almost as good as I remember it being.
But now very happy to be back on my Carbon Fiber Fliver again - heads above the older machines...
But Riding the Bike is still better than not... no matter the conditions or temps...
Ride On
Yuri
My impression of it not just unimpressive compared to some of the quality Japanese made bikes from the same era. Heavy and slow, but I just got it, added air and have not done a significant distance. Not bad for a round town I suppose.

What's the story on Univega, which I was quite happy with and the bikes they were making in the 80s? Just phenomenal ease of use, fast and light.

Last edited by TLit; 05-22-22 at 06:13 PM.
TLit is offline  
Old 05-22-22, 06:14 PM
  #55  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I rode the Motobecane Mirage today, not a bad bike. I'll try to run it by the town bike shop and see if they have any recommendations on basic tune up that I can probably do myself except for tire true-ing.
TLit is offline  
Old 05-22-22, 10:49 PM
  #56  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,865

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1576 Post(s)
Liked 1,572 Times in 991 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
I'm in the process of buying a good used road bike.

My budget does not allow paying $700 or more.
My only advice is to stick with your original game plan. It might take a while, but you will find a bike that is better than “not bad”.

Budgets get blown up really quickly on an impulse buy. If you can move the Motobecane for the $100 you paid, do it, If you can get $150, even better. It would be a good investment.

If you want a Univega, wait for the right one to show up.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Old 05-23-22, 05:40 AM
  #57  
livedarklions
High Performance Noodler
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 12,711

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6627 Post(s)
Liked 6,387 Times in 3,610 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
I stopped at a bike shop today that sells mainly Giant and Motobecane road bikes and he looked through the online inventory options and said that he didn't see much in my size. He said I might find something used.

On the old shifters I was generally quite content with the lever-based shifting. I did not micromanage my shifting, going for maximum torque, a middle one and then the least going up steep hills. I fail to see how having dozens of gears would be advantageous.

I love being able to shift while climbing. That's a lot easier with brifters.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-23-22, 05:58 AM
  #58  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
My only advice is to stick with your original game plan. It might take a while, but you will find a bike that is better than “not bad”.

Budgets get blown up really quickly on an impulse buy. If you can move the Motobecane for the $100 you paid, do it, If you can get $150, even better. It would be a good investment.

If you want a Univega, wait for the right one to show up.

John
That's what I was thinking. The Motobecane is 30#, but functional. I'll keep looking for a better bike, and clearly in my case anyway the online searching is less good than looking through a shop's used inventory which has become harder to find for obvious reasons. The best equipment is that which you will use a lot. But there is no magic carpet ride. You have to do the work of finding what you need and maintaining it.
TLit is offline  
Old 05-23-22, 06:51 AM
  #59  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 919

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Super Corsa

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 526 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 227 Posts
Don't forget, the sizes of bikes you're looking for are naturally going to be heavier than smaller sizes.
smd4 is offline  
Likes For smd4:
Old 05-23-22, 01:20 PM
  #60  
urbanknight
Over the hill
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 23,227

Bikes: Giant Defy, Specialized Allez, Raleigh Pursuit tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Liked 427 Times in 265 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
It's commendable that you are able to admit this in public.
Imagine the stupid stuff I WON'T admit!

Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I hear adult tricycles are pretty great. Maybe you don't know what you're missing?
When I worked for a bike shop, we actually had an adult tricycle to run errands with (toilet paper, hand towels, etc.), but nice try. I might have FOMO for recumbents though, but figure I might get a chance when the years take their toll on my back.
__________________
It's like riding a bicycle
urbanknight is online now  
Old 05-23-22, 02:17 PM
  #61  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I bought a Univega at a tag sale around 20 years ago; it was too small but for some reason I never thought of that; just raised the seat. I had my proper size Univega in storage and for some reason threw that out after getting a high estimate and kept the smaller one until it could no longer be repaired by me again too much to fix and gave it to the local shop.

Last edited by TLit; 05-23-22 at 04:48 PM.
TLit is offline  
Old 05-26-22, 03:30 PM
  #62  
lmk5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
If you are relatively satisfied with your cycling so far and don't need to go farther and longer, then no, there isn't anything special about the new stuff.

I can ride my old '78 Raleigh with six speeds on the rear just about as well on a 22 mile ride around here as I can my more modern Tarmac. The difference only appears when I'm trying to get that last fraction of a mph more average speed or ride for much longer periods at a time at a high effort.

But if you like riding relaxed and not so high effort, you probably won't see much except the novelty of more speeds on the rear. And maybe a few pounds less bike.

That being said, I seldom ride the Raleigh. The Tarmac is just so much more fun to ride because the less weight makes hills disappear and not be an issue for me. More speeds on the rear give me more choice for cadence selection to give me the power output I feel like I can maintain longer without tiring.
Do you know the weight of the Raleigh and the Tarmac?
lmk5 is offline  
Old 05-26-22, 04:13 PM
  #63  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,656

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4305 Post(s)
Liked 2,865 Times in 1,994 Posts
Originally Posted by lmk5 View Post
Do you know the weight of the Raleigh and the Tarmac?
My 1978 Raleigh Competition G.S. is 23.5 lbs (≈10.7 kg). The 2020 Tarmac Disc Comp Ultegra Di2 is 17.5 (≈7.9 kg) both with a small seat bag with tube, inflator, CO2 and some misc hex keys. No bottles. IIRC and probably weight accuracy is plus or minus ½ lb. I don't really obsess over knowing weight to the tiniest gram. It's just for rough comparison.

Will that do?
Iride01 is offline  
Old 05-26-22, 05:09 PM
  #64  
lmk5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
My 1978 Raleigh Competition G.S. is 23.5 lbs (≈10.7 kg). The 2020 Tarmac Disc Comp Ultegra Di2 is 17.5 (≈7.9 kg) both with a small seat bag with tube, inflator, CO2 and some misc hex keys. No bottles. IIRC and probably weight accuracy is plus or minus ½ lb. I don't really obsess over knowing weight to the tiniest gram. It's just for rough comparison.

Will that do?
Thanks. I guess that 6lb. weight drop (>25%) does translate into some performance gains. My present bike is 27lbs. and the bikes in my price range (Trek Domane) are about 22 lbs. I wonder how much difference I'd feel, all else being equal.
lmk5 is offline  
Old 05-27-22, 07:46 AM
  #65  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,656

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4305 Post(s)
Liked 2,865 Times in 1,994 Posts
Originally Posted by lmk5 View Post
Thanks. I guess that 6lb. weight drop (>25%) does translate into some performance gains. My present bike is 27lbs. and the bikes in my price range (Trek Domane) are about 22 lbs. I wonder how much difference I'd feel, all else being equal.
Bicycles from the most quality to the just about the lousiest quality are pretty efficient machines converting your up and down leg movements to linear distance traveled.

Weight pretty much only matters for times you are accelerating or climbing up hills. More weight slower accelerations. More weight more effort to climbs hills. If your hills are miles of steady climbing, it becomes apparent real quick what a lighter bicycle does for you. If you only have rolling terrain with 20 to 40 feet of elevation change, you might not notice the difference quite as quick. But you will notice that at the end of a longer ride that you have more energy left.

If you are a cyclist that likes to ride hard and fast, you'll likely notice the differences quicker than a those that are just out for a leisurely enjoyable ride.

The effects of traveling with weight are cumulative, so for longer rides the benefits of less weight will be big, just like being aero pays large benefits on longer rides.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 05-27-22, 07:25 PM
  #66  
timtak
Senior Member
 
timtak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Yamaguchi City, Japan
Posts: 888

Bikes: Trek Madone 5.2 SL 2007, Look KG386, R022 Re-framed Azzurri Primo, Felt Z5, Trek F7.3 FX

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 39 Posts
Trek 1000 (aluminium alas) in 61cm pick up in Beacon NY @300 USD
https://www.ebay.com/itm/20394751543...oAAOSw-NRicwXz

Approximately 90 minutes drive from Southern CT University

I am not keen on aluminium myself but I like integrated brifters, and you will be unlikely to get steel or carbon with brifters within your budget. You may be able to hold out for a aluminium/carbon bike, as I did recently, but if you put a long carbon seat post and long carbon stem on this bike (I think you will need long ones to make it your size) then they will flex and reduce road vibration.

I sent a message to the ebay seller to ask the height of the rider. The seller responded 6' 3" with 30" inseam. The stem is already pretty long but you can raise the saddle a bit, with the right seat post 2 more inches (though you probably only need one). The longest stems are generally 150mm. It may have a 150mm on it already. My guess is its a 140mm. I am not sure how long and low you like to ride but if you were to flip that stem so that it slopes down it would have the effect of making the reach a couple of inches longer.


Entry level road bike with brifters


I have been able to purchase full carbon with brifters within your budget by waiting but with the added restriction on frame size, you'd be waiting a long time. If you are happy with gear change on the frame, then I would recommend a steel bike such as those below (which have the gear shifters at the top of the steerer tube).

https://www.ebay.com/itm/26442360513...gAAOSwQ8ZgCxxP
https://www.ebay.com/itm/25478046018...QAAOSwwrRh14mo

If this seller could be persuaded to ship from California then it would be my choice but it (as the others) may be too small. Did find out the size of frame you need?
https://www.ebay.com/itm/29450497710...YAAOSw3VlhfCPa

Last edited by timtak; 05-29-22 at 02:34 AM. Reason: price and note about aluminum frames
timtak is online now  
Likes For timtak:
Old 05-30-22, 08:54 PM
  #67  
beng1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 51 Posts
I bought two Fuji road bikes last fall for a total of $80. I am riding one that is my size and giving the other to a friend who it fits well. Both bikes are close to fifty years old, and barring a catastrophe will last another fifty or more. My two other road bikes cost ten and three dollars and should also be good for many decades of riding into the future. Just buy any cheap bike that fits you and ride it. If it is in good shape and you are a good mechanic it will last you forever. Pretty much all bikes made before twenty or so years ago were very good quality, just stay away from old bikes that were high-end when new and they usually have very thin steel frames which can rust through or dent or crack much more easily than bikes with frames of straight-wall tubing. The most reliable bikes and cheapest to maintain are the older bikes that were low to mid price-range when new.
beng1 is offline  
Likes For beng1:
Old 05-31-22, 07:07 AM
  #68  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by timtak View Post
Trek 1000 (aluminium alas) in 61cm pick up in Beacon NY @300 USD
https://www.ebay.com/itm/20394751543...oAAOSw-NRicwXz

Approximately 90 minutes drive from Southern CT University
https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Beac...41.3317662!3e0

I am not keen on aluminium myself but I like integrated brifters, and you will be unlikely to get steel or carbon with brifters within your budget. You may be able to hold out for a aluminium/carbon bike, as I did recently, but if you put a long carbon seat post and long carbon stem on this bike (I think you will need long ones to make it your size) then they will flex and reduce road vibration.

I sent a message to the ebay seller to ask the height of the rider. The seller responded 6' 3" with 30" inseam. The stem is already pretty long but you can raise the saddle a bit, with the right seat post 2 more inches (though you probably only need one). The longest stems are generally 150mm. It may have a 150mm on it already. My guess is its a 140mm. I am not sure how long and low you like to ride but if you were to flip that stem so that it slopes down it would have the effect of making the reach a couple of inches longer.


Entry level road bike with brifters


I have been able to purchase full carbon with brifters within your budget by waiting but with the added restriction on frame size, you'd be waiting a long time. If you are happy with gear change on the frame, then I would recommend a steel bike such as those below (which have the gear shifters at the top of the steerer tube).

https://www.ebay.com/itm/26442360513...gAAOSwQ8ZgCxxP
https://www.ebay.com/itm/25478046018...QAAOSwwrRh14mo

If this seller could be persuaded to ship from California then it would be my choice but it (as the others) may be too small. Did find out the size of frame you need?
https://www.ebay.com/itm/29450497710...YAAOSw3VlhfCPa
Thank you for the links, I see now the quality level improvements that have come in the last 40 years. I just saw this post. I'll think about what my objectives are.
TLit is offline  
Likes For TLit:
Old 05-31-22, 05:45 PM
  #69  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,814

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Liked 301 Times in 216 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
Thank you for the links, I see now the quality level improvements that have come in the last 40 years. I just saw this post. I'll think about what my objectives are.
That Trek 1000 in Beacon certainly would be a good buy. I would note a few things. The Seattube size of 61, in this case is to top of Seattube which is extended well above the Top Tube, so in 'convention' I would call this more a 59/60... BUT the seattube is also showing the angles of the larger frame sizes, prolly a 72 deg, which helps it work for the taller riders...
And given the amount of seat post extension in the pic, the setup is clearly NOT for someone with a 32 cycling inseam, he might use 32 pants, but they'd be 'high water'. I don;t forsee needing much more extension than that for a bit longer cycling inseam... Seatpost will likely still have enough inside to accommodate. Stem is already quite long, very close to a 140... A 27 degree 140 stem would most likely be stratospheric enough for a higher bar stack.
It certainly is a nice bike, and would be a good buy at $300 even at more 'normal' used bike prices of 3/4 yrs ago.
...given its in reasonable running condition - and having good Brifters and good wheels, is quite a step up. For Downtube shifter riders , they are often a revelation.
Certainly worth strong consideration...
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 05-31-22, 05:56 PM
  #70  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Thanks, I see how it would be a step up; I can just imagine the increased torque or ease of climbing with lesser weight.

Also have a hankering for mid-80s Univegas, I was always happy with my early 1980 or so bike that I got so much mileage out of. One objective is to lose some weight, I do a lot of physical work together with plenty of exercise.
TLit is offline  
Old 06-01-22, 09:39 AM
  #71  
beng1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
Thanks, I see how it would be a step up; I can just imagine the increased torque or ease of climbing with lesser weight.

Also have a hankering for mid-80s Univegas, I was always happy with my early 1980 or so bike that I got so much mileage out of. One objective is to lose some weight, I do a lot of physical work together with plenty of exercise.
How much do you weigh? I am over 200 pounds generally, and have weighed as much as 240, and I am over 6'2". I quit chasing lightweight bikes when I realized that for a big person they are a much smaller percentage of the total bike/rider weight than they are with a small person. It is easy to find a bike that weighs five or ten pounds less than a low or mid-range priced bike, but five or ten pounds of a total weight of 220 or more pounds is 2.5% to 5% weight reduction. For small horse-jockey sized athletes, women and men included that might have total bike/rider weights of 120 to 170 pounds, they are getting much more for their money dumping it on weight savings, which is about all that really separates high and low-end bicycles, the time and materials to make it light. So if the weight saving translates directly into performance in hill climbing, which is the only part of a ride that weight savings would increase performance, then people are spending thousands of dollars for a small performance gain, and those who weigh more are getting less for their money than average or small people are getting for it. I think my 1987 Schwinn supersport with Columbus butted frame tubes weighs about ten pounds less than my Huffy, but it climbs worse because it has a close ratio "racing" style freewheel instead of the normal wide-ratio freewheel that most low and mid-range road-bikes came with back in the day. I paid dearly for the weight savings of the supersport, over three times as much as the Huffy, ten dollars instead of three.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-01-22, 04:22 PM
  #72  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Good point. Actually I am around 250# with the 6 6" height. So other considerations are probably more important than lightness. I am used to hard work, lifting 150-200# and more in tree work. But am looking to lose weight that has somehow creeped up on me.
TLit is offline  
Old 06-01-22, 08:22 PM
  #73  
beng1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by TLit View Post
Good point. Actually I am around 250# with the 6 6" height. So other considerations are probably more important than lightness. I am used to hard work, lifting 150-200# and more in tree work. But am looking to lose weight that has somehow creeped up on me.
I would say you can't be too far from an ideal weight for your height. Schwinn made some 27" tall "World" or "World Sport" road bikes back in the late 70s, early 80s which were too tall for me, I had to put the seat all the way down on the one I had, but they may be perfect for you. Even at my about 6' 2.5" current height I think a 25" frame is a bit too tall for me, but unfortunately most bike manufacturers did not make many different sizes of frames, usually just small, medium and large{25") sizes, so I usually end up with 25" bikes. I have a lot of experience in metal-fab, so am slowly working on my own custom "racing" frame that will have a seat-tube of a 25" bike, but the steering-head tube length of a smaller bike.
beng1 is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 04:35 AM
  #74  
TLit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: New Canaan, CT
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by beng1 View Post
I would say you can't be too far from an ideal weight for your height. Schwinn made some 27" tall "World" or "World Sport" road bikes back in the late 70s, early 80s which were too tall for me, I had to put the seat all the way down on the one I had, but they may be perfect for you. Even at my about 6' 2.5" current height I think a 25" frame is a bit too tall for me, but unfortunately most bike manufacturers did not make many different sizes of frames, usually just small, medium and large{25") sizes, so I usually end up with 25" bikes. I have a lot of experience in metal-fab, so am slowly working on my own custom "racing" frame that will have a seat-tube of a 25" bike, but the steering-head tube length of a smaller bike.
Probably ideal weight for me is around 235#; somehow I incrementally gained weight over the last few years, quit a low wage labor job at a home improvement store where physical demands were not shared to get back into self-employment.

I avoid junk food, drink a lot of organic teas and healthy herbs. I used to be heavily into juicing vegetables including alfalfa/radish sprouts, but now seem to maintain health with a healthy whole food diet. No physical complaints except for foot pain due to the weight. I went off beer and 80% quality beef. I probably consume too much in full fat quality milk products

I was finding the end of day hiking on rugged terrain 6-7 miles together with work was enough to maintain muscle tone, etc.. I was not focusing on cutting out calories especially evening meals which is essential.

The good thing about biking is it is easier on the feet and when you gain weight over than the feet's ability to operate, it is imperative to lose weight.
TLit is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 07:39 AM
  #75  
beng1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 51 Posts
Yes, tall people have it tough in this world, fitting into clothes, shoes, automobiles etc.. And they have to stay on top of their health much more than shorter people do as they are at higher risk of a lot of problems that come with age. I quit drinking alcohol regularly after the age of 35 because I WAY overdid it, and I have cut almost all red meat out too for a long time, mostly because the majority of food that is sold in the USA is full of chemicals, genetically modified, Monsanto crap etc.. Even if you go hunting and shoot a deer chances are it has been feasting on Monsanto GMO corn and Roundup chemicals all it's life, so no-thanks. I am lucky my feet stopped at size 13. You sound like you are on all the right tracks. I do have one of those large Schwinn World frames/forks hanging in my garden shed, I was saving it just in case I needed it's extra long frame tubes for some project, but if you can't find one in your area and want one, you can swing by and grab it someday. I am in NorthWest Pennsylvania though. I did drive to Boston one day, slept in a garage on a cot, then back home to buy an old Norton motorcycle that was in a basket though, and even further when I was younger for some pretty stupid reasons.....
beng1 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.