Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Plantar fasciitis

Old 06-26-22, 12:04 PM
  #1  
JenGQ
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 13

Bikes: Giant Escape 3, Giant Expressway, Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 5 Posts
Plantar fasciitis

I think I have this. I made a doctors appointment, but itís a two week wait. I googled it and got conflicting information. Most however seem to suggest that cycling doesnít cause it or make it worse. Anyone with experience with this have any input? I did go for a short ride and I didnít have any pain during or after.
JenGQ is offline  
Old 06-26-22, 01:06 PM
  #2  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,824
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1429 Post(s)
Liked 873 Times in 462 Posts
JenGQ, both my wife and I have been dealing with PF. There is no medical cure for it in the form of a pill, and really no need to visit the doc. Lots of advice out on the web that is accurate and simple. My wife went to the doc, I did not. She was told to stretch the achilles and calves, roll a ball under the foot along the arch in a massaging motion. The internet also provided this instruction, and is what I do as well. Yes, I self diagnosed, heaven forbid!
One thing to note, if you do not do the stretching and massage it can let go and holy moly you will be in a world of hurt! Surgery is required at that point. This happened to my friend's wife a few years back. Took six weeks to recover, and it requires a lot of painful stretching and massage. She now stretches and massages daily, as both my wife and I do.
FWIW, my wife is on her feet all day, I am moving all day and average 4-6 miles walking per day. So far the "therapy" employed is working for both of us.
TiHabanero is offline  
Likes For TiHabanero:
Old 06-26-22, 01:51 PM
  #3  
jadmt
Full Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 230
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Liked 99 Times in 44 Posts
I was a fairly competitive cyclist and developed a serious case of plantar fasciitis and cycling absolutely worsened it. Everyone is different. it took me a couple of years to recover. It only got better after having custom orthotics fitted. I would say if you are not having pain while cycling and after you are probably good. Sockwell plantar fasciitis socks really help but are hard to find in the shorter versions.
jadmt is offline  
Likes For jadmt:
Old 06-26-22, 02:42 PM
  #4  
Paul Barnard
For The Fun of It
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Louisissippi Coast
Posts: 5,338

Bikes: Lynskey GR300, Lynskey Backroad, Litespeed T6, Lynskey MT29, Burley Duet

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1823 Post(s)
Liked 1,144 Times in 591 Posts
I have had it twice in my life. Both times a brace thingy that i bought from the drug store did the trick. Something like this: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Plantar-F...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
Paul Barnard is offline  
Likes For Paul Barnard:
Old 06-26-22, 02:58 PM
  #5  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 34,826
Mentioned: 202 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15905 Post(s)
Liked 10,144 Times in 4,949 Posts
Stretch, stretch and stretch some more. If you have morning pain, stretch before you get out of bed. My ortho suggested things like stretching while at my desk every time I got an email and/or the phone rang.

As noted above, there is no cure in the form of a pill. Post #2 above sums up things well.
indyfabz is offline  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 06-26-22, 04:12 PM
  #6  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 3,956

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 381 Times in 263 Posts
Hi, Recently found an additionally useful therapy for muscle and connective tissue rehab and recovery - TENS muscle electrical device.
A friend is a well-known (certified) acupuncturist who now also uses TENS where applicable - with great success. She recently worked on me for both a left shoulder rotator cuff injury and just a few weeks ago, for a recurring right shoulder dislocation. It has helped immensely in the process of recovery and rehab.
It's not voodoo med - it's very well known and commonly used for many muscle and connective issues. It is NOT a 'cure' for any underlying causes, it's therapy.
google "TENS for muscle therapy" or something similar.
There really are no dangerous side effects or serious issues as long as it's used with some sense - NOT to be used near brain, heart, eyes, genitals - seems like one needn't say these cautions, but given the propensity of humans to be non-sensical , best to say it... LOL!
There are plenty of good TENS devices at the consumer level, and work well. It promotes blood circulation which makes recovery and rehab happen with more ease - and for connective tissue, blood circulation is one of the issues, because of lesser vascularity in that kind of tissue - hence the improvement thru TENS.
Check it out - it may help.
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 06-26-22, 04:14 PM
  #7  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 2,096

Bikes: Old Stuff

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 841 Post(s)
Liked 380 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by JenGQ View Post
I think I have this. I made a doctors appointment, but itís a two week wait. I googled it and got conflicting information. Most however seem to suggest that cycling doesnít cause it or make it worse. Anyone with experience with this have any input? I did go for a short ride and I didnít have any pain during or after.
I had a bout of Plantar Fasciitis a good 20ish years ago. It took a couple years to cure it. You need to find a Podiatrist. If it gets so bad that you feel like you have a nail driven into your heel they can give you a cortisone shot that will give you blessed relief. Stretching regimen for the calf muscles is a must along with heel down cycling posture and arch supports. You're Podiatrist can make you some custom orthotics if you don't get any relief from the dime store stuff. If you wear high heels throw them away or at least put them away until you are cured. Your Podiatrist will verify that. I even had to ditch work boots with heels.
If you have any excess weight you can lose, that will help. Don't forget to keep those calf muscles stretched forever. Getting a relapse really sucks.
FBOATSB is offline  
Likes For FBOATSB:
Old 06-26-22, 05:04 PM
  #8  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,191
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2431 Post(s)
Liked 1,494 Times in 968 Posts
Soles that are too stiff can cause it. People are different, so there could be different causes and remedies. Getting rid of it can be as painful as the band aids that help with the pain but not a cure. My story:
Run and jump athlete all of my life. Baseball, basketball court sports, etc. Got it really bad in my late 30s. I would slide down the stairs in the morning on my behind after a night of hooping it up. Gave up all court sports including my beloved basketball in my early 40s. I turned to cycling. Wife was/is a runner and wanted me to become one. Did lots of reading. Came to the conclusion that my feet had gotten weak and stiff from all those years wearing heavily structured/support court shoes. I threw away of all my shoes and got ones with cushioning, but no support of any kind. Bought some transition running shoes for people that were moving to barefoot running. The first run, all I could manage was about a mile before my feet were hurting so bad I could barely walk back. Woke up the next morning with no plantar pain. Went out the next day and managed to run a little farther before limping back to the house. Next morning, no plantar pain. Went through a month of that before the pain on the runs disappeared all together. That was around 15 years ago. Since then, the plantar is gone. I have some scar tissue I can feel, but no pain. Still roll it with a golf ball and stretch. I've ran around 10K miles since then including 14 marathons and various tris/obstacle races in addition to the cycling.

If you have access to a pool, swim or practice your leg kicking on the side or with a paddle board. That will stretch that area and the connecting tissue better than most of the other exercises combined. Good luck.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 06-26-22, 07:02 PM
  #9  
mirfi
Full Member
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 484

Bikes: Vilano Urbana, DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony, Iverson Grand Touring folder, Exclusiv German folder

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 90 Posts
Ten years ago I spent lots of money at the podiatrist who came up with $700 pads that fit in my shoe. Cured it.

Now I go to the local Walmart, Walgreen, CVS, whatever and buy the Dr Scholl's clone store brand.

It says right on it. For Plantar Fasciitis.

And when I hear of a friend/family with heal pain. I cure their skepticism with a gift of a pair of pads.

Under $20, take a chance.

Good luck..Keep riding.
mirfi is offline  
Likes For mirfi:
Old 06-27-22, 05:40 AM
  #10  
t2p
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: USA
Posts: 510

Bikes: Cannondale - Gary Fisher - Litespeed - Schwinn Paramount - Schwinn (lugged steel) - Trek OCLV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 167 Times in 121 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat View Post
Soles that are too stiff can cause it.
Actually - shoes that are too flexible / without proper support can lead to plantar fasciitis and aggravate it - especially in cases of a 'high arch'.

They allow the tendons (plantar fascia) to flex excessively - which can lead to plantar fasciitis and / or heel / 'bone spurs'.

This is one reason orthotics are often prescribed for plantar fascia problems - they provide additional / proper support for the arch / tendons and will reduce the amount of flex in this area (often from pronation).

A more stiff / neutral or stable support type shoe is then often recommended (or prescribed).

Distance runners that pronate will often run into plantar fascia problems - and then seek out a more stable / less flexible shoe - or in more severe cases will use orthotics.

'Shin splints' (and similar) can also be involved / related to plantar fascia problems - often from muscle imbalance (calf vs shin) / excessive increases in intensity / duration etc. This is one reason calf / achilles stretching is recommended and prescribed.

( severe cases of 'shin splints' can lead to 'compartment syndrome' / ischemia - you don't want to go there)

I could go on ... initially ran into these issues as a cyclist and runner years ago - and then more recently as a baseball coach from years / repetitive landing on forefoot when pitching batting practice and outfield reps (hitting fungo / fly balls to outfield).

Last edited by t2p; 06-27-22 at 05:50 AM.
t2p is offline  
Likes For t2p:
Old 06-27-22, 06:05 AM
  #11  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,191
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2431 Post(s)
Liked 1,494 Times in 968 Posts
Good article. Then another, which is conflicting with the other at times. Lots of info on the net.

https://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com...gies-can-help/

https://www.researchgate.net/publica...efoot_Pressure

https://www.thebikethebody.com/post/plantar-fasciitis

Last edited by seypat; 06-27-22 at 06:14 AM.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 06-27-22, 07:50 AM
  #12  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,617

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International, 2006(?) Felt F65

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1262 Post(s)
Liked 1,272 Times in 645 Posts
I had my first round of Plantars Fascitis about 6 years ago. I tried a generic store bought shoe inserts and it worked. So now all shoes get them, and I have elastic strap-on arch supports for wearing sandals or walking barefoot around the house.

Biking does not seem to aggravate it (I wear arch supports in those shoes, too). Now that I work from home, I spend more time in bare feet and flip flops, and if I spend a day without the arch supports that seems to bring on the PF issues.
BobbyG is offline  
Likes For BobbyG:
Old 06-27-22, 08:02 AM
  #13  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 2,096

Bikes: Old Stuff

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 841 Post(s)
Liked 380 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
I had my first round of Plantars Fascitis about 6 years ago. I tried a generic store bought shoe inserts and it worked. So now all shoes get them, and I have elastic strap-on arch supports for wearing sandals or walking barefoot around the house.

Biking does not seem to aggravate it (I wear arch supports in those shoes, too). Now that I work from home, I spend more time in bare feet and flip flops, and if I spend a day without the arch supports that seems to bring on the PF issues.
Our Podiatrist preaches shoes at all times, even indoors. I have to somewhat agree after stepping on lego "cat toys" on a hardwood floor in the dark. But I compromise with Crocs.
FBOATSB is offline  
Likes For FBOATSB:
Old 06-27-22, 08:36 AM
  #14  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,493
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 753 Post(s)
Liked 798 Times in 471 Posts
I will be the outlier here. I usually wore minimalist shoes, shoes by Softstar Shoes, that have no arch support, and only a thin, 5mm sole. I worked up to wearing them a little at a time. Once I was adapted to them, I had no issues. I started wearing them after barefoot running to help retrain my stride. I used to get shin splints when running. After barefoot running a short time, I corrected my stride, and never got shin splint again. I also never got plantar fasciitis while wearing them. I used barefoot running as a training method to develop a more natural stride. It worked. I then started wearing the minimalist shoes.

Fast forward to the pandemic. I was home during the pandemic, and was walking during the Winter. I was usually on ships in warm climates a lot of the Winter for work, so I was able to wear the minimalist shoes. I was off due to the pandemic, so I wore heavy shoes with "proper" support all Winter. I went back out in the spring, now unaccustomed to not having support, and got plantar fasciitis. My fault for not allowing myself to build up to wearing shoes with no support. The muscles supporting my foot had atrophied from wearing the supportive shoes and boots. In the 14 years leading up to this event though, wearing minimalist shoes, I never had plantar fasciitis. I did have it before wearing minimalist shoes though.

Wearing shoes with support weakens the muscles that support the arch, and stabilizes the foot. If that is all you wear, you have to continue to wear them, or give yourself time to slowly rebuild the muscles that support your foot by transitioning slowly to less support. I am doing that now, but still wear good running shoes with support for running right now. I have found that stiffer shoes aggravate plantar fasciitis, while more flexible soles did not. That is not to say flexible shoes with no support, just flexible soles. Overly stiff soles though made the ailment worse.

I believe the reason many elderly people have issues with walking and balance, is that their feet and supporting muscles are so weak from being in shoes that have too much support, that prevent the foot from working the way it is made to work. The associated muscles are atrophied from lack of use.

I am not telling you that you have to wear minimalist shoes, or to stop wearing shoes with support, that is your decision. I do a mix of both right now. I am wearing Xero shoes, and my "proper" running shoes. I also no longer have plantar fasciitis. Just food for thought, but when I hear podiatrists say to never go barefoot, I have to laugh. Their idea for shoes does a lot to create a foot that can never go barefoot, rather than actually making the foot stronger and more resilient to injury. The support they advocate makes the foot weaker. They instead should advocate exercise for the foot, and slow adaptation to being barefoot on occasion, rather than never at all. Do they realize that when man first walked on the earth, they most likely didn't have shoes. However did they manage?
phughes is offline  
Likes For phughes:
Old 06-27-22, 08:51 AM
  #15  
fishboat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,550

Bikes: Lemond '01 Maillot Jaune, Lemond '02 Victoire, Lemond '03 Poprad, Lemond '03 Wayzata drop bar conv(Poprad), '79 AcerMex Windsor Carrera Professional(purchased new), '88 GT Tequesta(purchased new), '01 Bianchi Grizzly, 1993 Trek 970 drop bar conv

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 590 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 537 Times in 318 Posts
There's some contradictory suggestions here on what to do to cure/avoid/alleviate PF. The take away is different approaches seem to work for different people.

I've had PF a couple times over the last 15 years. It can be bad and take 1-2 years to get rid of.

The first time I had it, despite stretching, rolling balls, custom orthotics over 18 months.......... it wouldn't heal up. I finally returned to the doc and had a couple cortisone shots in my heel (there's some real fun if you like pain) and that made it disappear. I've had a couple minor bouts of PF since.

What I've learned:

1) Podiatrist said to never walk barefoot again. I follow this inside and outside the house. If you look into how PF happens, it makes sense that walking barefoot is a bad idea. (I also have appreciably high arches) For probably 10+ years after my "main event" I wore arch-supportive water-sandals in the shower.

2) Following #1 above, wearing shoes with poor arch and/or without proper foot support is just asking for additional PF issues..that's how I/you got there to begin with. As you look for shoes, you'll find that 90+% of shoes sold have garbage support for an actual human foot. If you don't need support..then no issues, but look at a average human foot and then look at your basic shoe with a flat insole. Makes no sense.

3) Custom insoles do help, but they are grossly overpriced. BTDT. There are over the counter insoles that work just as well. Spenco Total Support MAX(must be the MAX versions) or Walkcomfy insoles or Superfeet insoles or others..REI has some good ones...the key is that the insole has a hard, non-flexible arch support. The idea here is that your foot is supported and held in proper position when you walk. The insoles with soft foam & flexible arch support just squish down when your arch pushes on it..which is opposite of what you're seeking (that is..support).

4) Shoe or insole brands selling "soft and cushy" footbeds are iffy. Soft and cushy doesn't solve your problem..support, proper foot alignment, and stretching does. Soft and cushy shoes are like soft and cushy bike saddles..not good in the long run.

5) Stretching certainly helps, although the lack of daily stretching isn't a direct, hard, quick line to a surgical procedure. While there's always an outlier where this is the case, if your foot has proper support (good shoes, insoles..etc) then the lack of regular stretching will only increase your chances of having an issue, not insure you will have an issue. I think regular stretching is the surest way not to have an issue. Regular stretching and poor shoes/arch support, or walking barefoot a lot, is rolling dice.

6) Take a look at the soles of your favorite shoes or sandals. If they are more worn on the outside edges than in the middle, then you need more arch support. You're walking on the outside of your feet as your foot is looking for support.

I'm not much for clickbait videos on youtube, but this one is pretty good:
fishboat is offline  
Likes For fishboat:
Old 06-27-22, 12:16 PM
  #16  
t2p
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: USA
Posts: 510

Bikes: Cannondale - Gary Fisher - Litespeed - Schwinn Paramount - Schwinn (lugged steel) - Trek OCLV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 167 Times in 121 Posts
in addition to #6 above - excessive wear on the inside part of the soles can also indicate a need for additional arch support

often - but not always - excessive wear on outside part of the soles can indicate under-pronation / supination that can be the result of high arch with not enough support ... this can lead to plantar fasciitis

and excessive wear on the inside part of the sole can be the result of (excessive) pronation - which can lead to plantar fasciitis

in both cases the tendons / plantar fascia can lack the proper support and be subjected to excessive stress

because the tendons / plantar fascia do not have the amount of blood flow of a muscle and therefore recovery can be longer (and frustrating)
t2p is offline  
Likes For t2p:
Old 06-27-22, 12:37 PM
  #17  
Ronwalker
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I have had health problems because of cycling, but this doesn't seem to be because of cycling.
Ronwalker is offline  
Likes For Ronwalker:
Old 06-27-22, 02:51 PM
  #18  
HelpSingularity 
Newbie
 
HelpSingularity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Location: San Diego
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 12 Posts
I suffered from PF almost 30 years ago. The number one thing that seemed to fix it was purchasing and using store bought foot beds, aka insoles. And not the flat piece of foam rubber but one with a heel cup and rigid arch support, like the kind from Superfeet. I just looked and they are now 60 bucks which seems like a lot. But they changed my life. 30 years now and no foot pain. Whenever I purchase a pair of shoes I remove (or tear out) the stock insole and slip the Superfeet insole in. Works like a charm. Highly recommend them, two thumbs up.
HelpSingularity is offline  
Likes For HelpSingularity:
Old 06-27-22, 03:37 PM
  #19  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,186

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1395 Post(s)
Liked 591 Times in 369 Posts
I had a couple of cases of PF, separate cases on each foot. The last one was caused by overly-flexible tennis shoes. Cycling did not cause or aggravate it. What I did was fill a pop bottle with water and stick it in the freezer. Then, roll the arch of my foot on it for a half-hour at a time, paying extra attention to where it was the most sore. I used a fair amount of pressure, like wedging my knee under a desk to increase the force. The ice keeps it from swelling, Heat feels good at first, but ends up making things worse the next day. (Don't apply heat!) I tried the Strassburg sock route, but it didn't help at all.

Last edited by BlazingPedals; 06-28-22 at 12:45 PM.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Likes For BlazingPedals:
Old 06-28-22, 06:16 AM
  #20  
Rdmonster69
Shawn of the Dead
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 553
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Liked 433 Times in 210 Posts
A good therapy for PF is to lay a dish towel or something similar on the floor and then use your toes to scrunch it up under your foot. This is a great exercise for the foot and is very low impact. Start at the very end of the towel and see how much you can pull under your foot. A smallish towel (shop rag or microfiber polishing cloth, dish towel etc) works great and you can get quite a bit under your foot.

I did this when I used to jog a fair amount.
Rdmonster69 is offline  
Likes For Rdmonster69:
Old 06-28-22, 12:01 PM
  #21  
mirfi
Full Member
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 484

Bikes: Vilano Urbana, DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony, Iverson Grand Touring folder, Exclusiv German folder

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 90 Posts
All,

I had to stop wearing flip-flops because of the pain.

Took a chance on Reef Ortho Spring sandals, bought from Zappos(?). Working from home, I wear them all the time.

This was pre-pandemic, so was like $29. More expensive now.

Just throwing that out there.
mirfi is offline  
Likes For mirfi:
Old 06-28-22, 03:51 PM
  #22  
urbanknight
Over the hill
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 23,281

Bikes: Giant Defy, Specialized Allez, Raleigh Pursuit tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Liked 467 Times in 286 Posts
I have had some amount of PF for the last 20+ years with the worst of it being when I gained a lot of weight. I suppose toe pointing would lead to an even tighter achilles tendon (which in turns leads to PF), so maybe a heel-down pedal stroke (with a slightly lower saddle) would help, but I really don't know about that... and that risks messing with a good bike fit. As for me personally, I don't feel like cycling has helped or hurt, other than the resulting weight loss from getting back in shape put less stress on my feet overall.
__________________
It's like riding a bicycle
urbanknight is offline  
Likes For urbanknight:
Old 06-29-22, 12:32 PM
  #23  
phughes
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,493
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 753 Post(s)
Liked 798 Times in 471 Posts
Originally Posted by urbanknight View Post
I have had some amount of PF for the last 20+ years with the worst of it being when I gained a lot of weight. I suppose toe pointing would lead to an even tighter achilles tendon (which in turns leads to PF), so maybe a heel-down pedal stroke (with a slightly lower saddle) would help, but I really don't know about that... and that risks messing with a good bike fit. As for me personally, I don't feel like cycling has helped or hurt, other than the resulting weight loss from getting back in shape put less stress on my feet overall.
It doesn't mess with a good bike fit, it corrects a bad bike fit. If you are pedaling toe down, and experiencing issues with the Achilles Tendon, it is a bad bike fit. Ask me how I know.

Also, most people who pedal toe down because of seat height, actually do not spin fluidly throughout the stroke. Lowering the seat height in that case will allow the person to spin fluidly, and be more efficient, and prevent injury in the process.
phughes is offline  
Likes For phughes:
Old 06-30-22, 08:55 AM
  #24  
m.c. 
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 95 Times in 54 Posts
A local Dr came up with this. People say good things about it. I've never needed it so I have no experience with it. I think it stretches the muscle as you walk.

www.thehealingsole.com
m.c. is online now  
Old 06-30-22, 11:53 AM
  #25  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,186

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1395 Post(s)
Liked 591 Times in 369 Posts
That orthopedic sandal might be good for prevention. Of course, how do you know you need to prevent it? You never know until it's too late. Plantar Faciitis is basically tendonitis (tight tendon) in the bottom of your foot. The cure is to stretch and loosen it back the way it's supposed to be. In theory, the Strassburg sock gently stretches the tendon while you sleep. Any stretching will help, as long as you don't make things even worse through inflammation. What the rolling-your-foot-on-a-frozen-bottle accomplishes is to stretch the tendons without causing a lot of swelling due to inflammation.

The pain of Plantar Faciitis tends to go away as you use your foot and the tendons warm up. So I suppose gently stretching your arch after warming up might help - the keyword being "gentle."
BlazingPedals is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.