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Can't ride rigid bikes anymore.

Old 08-12-22, 08:45 AM
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Sprung Saddle. LOL.
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Old 08-12-22, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus
As mentioned a couple of times above, comfortably riding a road bike takes technique and experience. Scan the road, identify obstacles, and if you can't avoid them you unweight and let your body flex rather than the bike. There's also a certain amount of HTFU.

A MTBer friend from out of town was visiting me and wanted to go for a short ride around my town. I loaned him a road bike. I was appalled at how much punishment he was taking. Every little bump was telegraphing up his spine and arms. I could see him wince. Less than ten miles into the ride he had enough neck and hand pain we aborted the rest of the ride and went home early. I realized too late he had no idea how to ride a road bike. And I know there are MTB techniques I've never mastered.
Maybe because I came up MTB 'ing in the early 1990s on ridgids and short -travel hardtails, that I've found the opposite to be true; I'm a lot more aggressive about getting off the saddle, and even getting the wheels off the ground, if needed, on my road bikes than many of the road - only folks I ride with.
In the long & low NORBA era of 140mm stems and 60mm-travel forks, "riding light" was how you got things done.

I've found that modern MTBs are so much more capable on the trail, with long -travel forks and the proliferation of effective full suspension, that takes a lot of the "work" out of riding off-road. MTB geometry also has diverged significantly from the 26" era, more upright and less forward bias than older designs.

Could be that your friend isn't used to any bike without suspension, and add that to different kind of geometry, and the complication of drop bars (Contrary to BF lore, drops are not a natural transition if you're accustomed to riding straight bars) not surprising that he struggled on the borrowed roadie.
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Old 08-12-22, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
To be blunt, they’re probably not riding $129 bikes. It makes a difference.
That's for sure!!!

But really, Ya ride what ya got. If it's comfortable then so much the better. The point is to ride. All my bikes are Frankenized for comfort and cost. In some ways it can be embarrassing. Kinda like that guy who has a Spring Loaded Tractor Seat on his MASI. Ya find what you need and quite possibly what you like and put together a bike ya can ride. I don't think I could comfortably ride any off the shelf bicycle... So Sad...
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Old 08-12-22, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus
As mentioned a couple of times above, comfortably riding a road bike takes technique and experience. Scan the road, identify obstacles, and if you can't avoid them you unweight and let your body flex rather than the bike. There's also a certain amount of HTFU.

A MTBer friend from out of town was visiting me and wanted to go for a short ride around my town. I loaned him a road bike. I was appalled at how much punishment he was taking. Every little bump was telegraphing up his spine and arms. I could see him wince. Less than ten miles into the ride he had enough neck and hand pain we aborted the rest of the ride and went home early. I realized too late he had no idea how to ride a road bike. And I know there are MTB techniques I've never mastered.
Mountain bikers are unweighting (getting off the seat) all the time. His problem was that he didn't ride the road bike like his mountain bike.
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Old 08-12-22, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by prj71
Sprung Saddle. LOL.
What's funny about that? I'm riding much more comfortable than you are, and the sprung saddle certainly does not make me a lesser cyclist than you.
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Old 08-12-22, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
What's funny about that? I'm riding much more comfortable than you are, and the sprung saddle certainly does not make me a lesser cyclist than you.
Can't ride rigid bikes anymore.
???

You are saying you "can't ride a rigid road bike (with a sprung saddle) anymore" to people who have no problems riding rigid road bikes (without sprung saddles).

And you are "much more comfortable" than them?

How do you manage to be much less comfortable and much more comfortable than those riders?

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-12-22 at 11:40 AM.
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Old 08-12-22, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
???

You are saying you "can't ride a rigid road bike (with a sprung saddle) anymore" to people who have no problems riding rigid road bikes (without sprung saddles).

And you are "much more comfortable" than them?

How do you managed to be much less comfortable and much more comfortable than those riders?

Easy, I'm much more comfortable than he is, but I'm much less comfortable than what I wanted/used to be.

Anyway, in hindsight I admit the title I wrote was evidently exaggerated.
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Old 08-12-22, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Easy, I'm much more comfortable than he is, but I'm much less comfortable than what I wanted/used to be.
Still, no. What you said doesn't make sense. You have no idea how comfortable he is (or all of the millions of other road riders using rigid bikes).

The suspension on rigid bikes is mostly the rider's legs, followed by the air in the tires. Riders get used to automatically loosen-up going over bumps.

If you coast a lot with all of your weight on the saddle, you aren't going to be very happy.

Be sure to read Ironfish's post carefully.

Can't ride rigid bikes anymore.

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-12-22 at 11:51 AM.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
Still, no. What you said doesn't make sense. You have no idea how comfortable he is (or all of the millions of other road riders using rigid bikes).

The suspension on rigid bikes is mostly the rider's legs, followed by the air in the tires. Riders get used to automatically loosen-up going over bumps.

If you coast a lot with all of your weight on the saddle, you aren't going to be very happy.

Be sure to read Ironfish's post carefully.
I'm aware the riding style is very important for the rider's comfort, infact there are many interesting and constructive posts in this thread about that.

Let's put it another way then: I'm much more comfortable and safe than him in the (rare, but always possible) case of an unseen pothole or other similar obstacle. Actually, my reply was just in response to him laughing about sprung saddles.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
I'm aware the riding style is very important for the rider's comfort,
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
I know that almost all "advanced amateurs" cyclists ride rigid bikes even for long distance riding, and I wonder how they do it. I would probably be knackered if I'd try that.
So, you are aware of a reason but "wonder how they do it".

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Let's put it another way then: I'm much more comfortable and safe than him in the (rare, but always possible) case of an unseen pothole or other similar obstacle.
This still might not be true. He might be seeing them when you aren't and one can ride in a way that sets you up for ones that one doesn't see.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Actually, my reply was just in response to him laughing about sprung saddles.
Him "laughing" might be related to your being less and more comfortable than millions of cyclists many of whom might have more experience than you do.

People's first posts should try to avoid being inexperienced people telling experienced people they are all wrong about something they do routinely.

(You had 2 posts 7 years ago.)

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
.. infact ...
This is two words (by the way).

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-12-22 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Let's put it another way then: I'm much more comfortable and safe than him in the (rare, but always possible) case of an unseen pothole or other similar obstacle.
You either have an exaggerated impression of what a sprung saddle can do, an exaggerated intolerance for minor discomfort, or both. Regardless, you don’t have any idea how uncomfortable anyone else is. Those of us who have put in thousands of miles have learned how to navigate rough terrain comfortably and safely, without suspension or springs.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
This still might not be true. He might be seeing them when you aren't
Uh? The comparison wouldn't make sense otherwise...

Originally Posted by njkayaker
Him "laughing" might be related to your being less and more comfortable than millions of cyclists many of whom might have more experience than you do.
Uh? I never said that whoever rides a rigid bike is wrong. I just said that for some reason (maybe years of habit, who knows) I personally find rigid bikes more uncomfortable than most cyclists.

Originally Posted by njkayaker
People's first posts should try to avoid being inexperienced people telling experienced people they are all wrong about something they do routinely.
Where did I say anyone's wrong? If anything, he ridiculed the fact that I'm using a sprung saddle?
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Old 08-12-22, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
What's funny about that? I'm riding much more comfortable than you are, and the sprung saddle certainly does not make me a lesser cyclist than you.
A seat of the right width that properly supports your sit bones is more comfortable than any sprung saddle or super thick foam padded gel seat that's out there.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolla
You either have an exaggerated impression of what a sprung saddle can do, an exaggerated intolerance for minor discomfort, or both. Regardless, you don’t have any idea how uncomfortable anyone else is. Those of us who have put in thousands of miles have learned how to navigate rough terrain comfortably and safely, without suspension or springs.
I'm pretty sure a sprung saddle makes things a bit more comfortable when encountering an UNSEEN pothole.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by prj71
A seat of the right width that properly supports your sit bones is more comfortable than any sprung saddle or super thick foam padded gel seat that's out there.
Yeah I know that's common knowledge. In my case I found it otherwise.
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Old 08-12-22, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by njkayaker
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Let's put it another way then: I'm much more comfortable and safe than him in the (rare, but always possible) case of an unseen pothole or other similar obstacle.
This still might not be true. He might be seeing them when you aren't and one can ride in a way that sets you up for ones that one doesn't see.
Uh? The comparison wouldn't make sense otherwise...
Your argument is based on the premise that both of you ride the same.

I'm saying experienced people on rigid road bikes ride in a way that avoids most of the problems that you think both are seeing at the same frequency.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Especially for long distance riding. I know that almost all "advanced amateurs" cyclists ride rigid bikes even for long distance riding, and I wonder how they do it. I would probably be knackered if I'd try that.
Uh? I never said that whoever rides a rigid bike is wrong.
Many of your posts (especially, the first one) are some form of "I think you are doing it wrong. Prove to me otherwise.".

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
I just said that for some reason (maybe years of habit, who knows) I personally find rigid bikes more uncomfortable than most cyclists.
No, you didn't say that. You should have said that.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Do you think the most expensive road bike on 25mm tires is even remotely compliant as a full sus with a sprung saddle and wide tires?

Yes / no.
It's questions like this that are causing you problems in this thread. It's implying that "the most expensive road bike on 25mm tires" is supposed to be compliant, which is silly.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
I'm pretty sure a sprung saddle makes things a bit more comfortable when encountering an UNSEEN pothole.
The number of potholes "unseen" by experienced/competent road riders is rare.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Moreover, with the full sus I can steamroll over the many speedbumps I cross.
Where did I say anyone's wrong? If anything, he ridiculed the fact that I'm using a sprung saddle?
He might be "ridiculing" you for using a device to compensate for poor technique.

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-12-22 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
How do you manage to be much less comfortable and much more comfortable than those riders?
He uses a Schrödinger saddle.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:03 PM
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I have similar goals and equipment as you do.
My now primary bike is a 2014 Trek Marlin 6 that is now set up with a mostly Deore group set, a Salsa Cromoto steel fork, ES500 SPD pedals, Ergon bar ends, Marathon 45mm Green Guards and a Cobb enduro saddle. The Marlin has morphed into a quasi Adventure-Touring bike and it is time to measure and research possible bike packing bags for short 3-5 day SoCal mountain tours. The bike weighs 32 lbs with pedals, bottle cages in a XL frame.

I realize the limitations with this bike as is will be to stick to pavement, rough pavement and hard pack fire roads. It is not a bike, as is, for single track or anything technical.
I think the bike will serve my needs and I am not in a hurry so I see no need to budget for a more expensive gravel/adventure bike.

I find the upright position and stance to my liking. I see no reason why your used rigid mtb bike cannot be used as a touring bike if you find it comfortable and adaptable to your purpose.





Originally Posted by Murmur1979
For the last dozen years or so, I've almost exclusively ridden a cheapo (129 EUR / USD) full suspended MTB, on which I mounted a plushy sprung saddle and slick 42mm tires.

In anticipation of future endurance rides (or possibly even credit card touring) that I'd like to try, and because common knowledge is that a full sus MTB wouldn't be the ideal bike for that, I bought an used '90s rigid MTB to modify for the purpose.

Sure, its 52mm tires and the said plushy sprung saddle which I mounted on it, make it certainly more comfortable than un upright city bike (or a road bike), and yet the full sus MTB is noticeably more comfortable.

Infact, the asphalt where I live is definitely not in good conditions. Moreover, with the full sus I can steamroll over the many speedbumps I cross.

"Duh! Of course a full sus is more comfortable than a rigid!", you are thinking. Yeah, I know. I was just wondering if there's some of you who only rides suspended bikes, with at least a suspension fork, and maybe a sprung saddle. Especially for long distance riding. I know that almost all "advanced amateurs" cyclists ride rigid bikes even for long distance riding, and I wonder how they do it. I would probably be knackered if I'd try that.

Last edited by CAT7RDR; 08-12-22 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
I'm pretty sure a sprung saddle makes things a bit more comfortable when encountering an UNSEEN pothole.
A hundred-dollar solution to a ten-cent problem.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
For the last dozen years or so, I've almost exclusively ridden a cheapo (129 EUR / USD) full suspended MTB, on which I mounted a plushy sprung saddle and slick 42mm tires.

In anticipation of future endurance rides (or possibly even credit card touring) that I'd like to try, and because common knowledge is that a full sus MTB wouldn't be the ideal bike for that, I bought an used '90s rigid MTB to modify for the purpose.

Sure, its 52mm tires and the said plushy sprung saddle which I mounted on it, make it certainly more comfortable than un upright city bike (or a road bike), and yet the full sus MTB is noticeably more comfortable.

Infact, the asphalt where I live is definitely not in good conditions. Moreover, with the full sus I can steamroll over the many speedbumps I cross.

"Duh! Of course a full sus is more comfortable than a rigid!", you are thinking. Yeah, I know. I was just wondering if there's some of you who only rides suspended bikes, with at least a suspension fork, and maybe a sprung saddle. Especially for long distance riding. I know that almost all "advanced amateurs" cyclists ride rigid bikes even for long distance riding, and I wonder how they do it. I would probably be knackered if I'd try that.
You keep suggesting that the only thing that matters is to be able to "steamroll" over speedbumps and potholes.

Every choice requires a compromise (a trade-off of different capabilities).

Here you should be thinking of reasons why they do it.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
Many of your posts (especially, the first one) are some form of "I think you are doing it wrong. Prove to me otherwise.".
Uhm... No.

Originally Posted by njkayaker
It's implying that "the most expensive road bike on 25mm tires" is supposed to be compliant, which is silly.
If someone thinks that a 129$ full sus MTB with a spring saddle should be less compliant than a top of the line road bike, yes that's silly.

Originally Posted by njkayaker
The number of potholes "unseen" by experienced/competent road riders is rare.
Very very rare by me too.

Originally Posted by njkayaker
He might be "ridiculing" you for using a device to compensate for poor technique.
Well, looks like there are people who spend 250$ for a Redshift suspension post to "compensate for poor technique".
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Old 08-12-22, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Rolla
A hundred-dollar solution to a ten-cent problem.
More like 19.99 $. The comfort is worth it.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Uhm... No.
Whoosh!

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
If someone thinks that a 129$ full sus MTB with a spring saddle should be less compliant than a top of the line road bike, yes that's silly.
Who thinks this?

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Well, looks like there are people who spend 250$ for a Redshift suspension post to "compensate for poor technique".
You are compensating for your poor technique.

Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Murmur1979
Originally Posted by Rolla
A hundred-dollar solution to a ten-cent problem.
More like 19.99 $. The comfort is worth it.
Well, looks like there are people who spend 250$ for a Redshift suspension post,,,
Not $100. $20 or $250. It's the same. right?

Last edited by njkayaker; 08-12-22 at 01:34 PM.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR
I have similar goals and equipment as you do.
My now primary bike is a 2014 Trek Marlin 6 that is now set up with a mostly Deore group set, a Salsa Cromoto steel fork, ES500 SPD pedals, Ergon bar ends, Marathon 45mm Green Guards and a Cobb enduro saddle. The Marlin has morphed into a quasi Adventure-Touring bike and it is time to measure and research possible bike packing bags for short 3-5 day SoCal mountain tours. The bike weighs 32 lbs with pedals, bottle cages in a XL frame.

I realize the limitations with this bike as is will be to stick to pavement, rough pavement and hard pack fire roads. It is not a bike, as is, for single track or anything technical.
I think the bike will serve my needs and I am not in a hurry so I see no need to budget for a more expensive gravel/adventure bike.

I find the upright position and stance to my liking. I see no reason why your used rigid mtb bike cannot be used as a touring bike if you find it comfortable and adaptable to your purpose.
Thank you very much CAT7RDR. At least an interesting and useful post, that's the feedback I was looking for.
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Old 08-12-22, 01:34 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by njkayaker
Whoosh!
You are compensating for your poor technique.
Maybe. At least I didn't spend 250$ on a suspension seatpost, but only 19.90$ on a sprung saddle.
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