Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Riding Through Multiple Flats

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Riding Through Multiple Flats

Old 08-23-22, 04:58 PM
  #26  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Ok, I'm pump shopping and it looks like none of the pumps you guys recommended have gauges. Do you carry a gauge, or know how many pump strokes equals X psi or what?
tessellahedron is offline  
Old 08-23-22, 05:22 PM
  #27  
terrymorse 
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 4,988

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1535 Post(s)
Liked 1,408 Times in 753 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
Ok, I'm pump shopping and it looks like none of the pumps you guys recommended have gauges. Do you carry a gauge, or know how many pump strokes equals X psi or what?
I use the finger squeeze method of pressure measurement.

But if the finger squeeze method is not to your liking, Lezyne makes the Digital Road Drive, with an integrated "highly accurate Digital Strip Gauge".


__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

terrymorse is online now  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 08-23-22, 05:48 PM
  #28  
GhostRider62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 3,057
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1791 Post(s)
Liked 1,484 Times in 944 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
Ok, I'm pump shopping and it looks like none of the pumps you guys recommended have gauges. Do you carry a gauge, or know how many pump strokes equals X psi or what?
This is the road mini pump I recommended, it has an inline digital gage. Mine is older and the pressure gage is analog.

https://ride.lezyne.com/collections/...-mfdr-v204hpdg
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 08-23-22, 10:57 PM
  #29  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,829

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5232 Post(s)
Liked 2,789 Times in 1,645 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
Ok, I'm pump shopping and it looks like none of the pumps you guys recommended have gauges. Do you carry a gauge, or know how many pump strokes equals X psi or what?
The Lezyne has a gauge and most of the Topeak Morphs (there are several version) have gauges. Some in-line and a few that are gauges.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 08-24-22, 03:59 PM
  #30  
urbanknight
Over the hill
 
urbanknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 23,743

Bikes: Giant Defy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Liked 738 Times in 447 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
I carry CO2 and a spare tube to avoid getting stranded but once it's installed I have to turn around because another flat would leave me stuck.
There's a flaw in even that logic because there are no guarantees that your next flat will be at least as many miles as you had leading to the first. As a matter of fact, it's not uncommon to get two flats at about the same time because both tires rolled through the same debris that caused it in the first place. If you turn around at mile 10 and get a flat a mile later, that's still a long way to walk.

CO2 is for speed, but a quality pump doesn't run out of air. A new tube is also quick, but you can carry more patches than tubes. When I ran tubes, I kept a CO2 cartridge and a spare tube to get me back on the road quickly and not hold my friends up, and a patch kit and hand pump to at least be able to get home after telling them to go on and avoid my bad luck for the day.

A gauge isn't really necessary out on the road as the thumb can usually tell a pressure that's adequate enough to ride safely, even if it isn't the optimum pressure for speed and comfort.
__________________
It's like riding a bicycle
urbanknight is offline  
Old 08-24-22, 04:11 PM
  #31  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Just ordered a topeak road morph g. I suspect it will work much better than its bizarre name. Got a good deal on a new one in damaged packaging. If it does suck I'll return it but I'm hopeful. It looks super easy to use, which more than compensates for the low capacity vs other pumps I considered (83cc vs 100+).

now I just need some vials for cement (I bought the can).
tessellahedron is offline  
Likes For tessellahedron:
Old 08-24-22, 04:18 PM
  #32  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,829

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5232 Post(s)
Liked 2,789 Times in 1,645 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
Just ordered a topeak road morph g. I suspect it will work much better than its bizarre name. Got a good deal on a new one in damaged packaging. If it does suck I'll return it but I'm hopeful. It looks super easy to use, which more than compensates for the low capacity vs other pumps I considered (83cc vs 100+).

now I just need some vials for cement (I bought the can).

The name comes from it’s ability to “morph” from a frame pump to a foot pump.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 08-25-22, 06:38 AM
  #33  
wheelreason
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 817
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
I carry CO2 and a spare tube to avoid getting stranded but once it's installed I have to turn around because another flat would leave me stuck.

I hear about people with better setups who can get numerous flats and keep riding, so I'm trying to figure out how to do that.

do they carry 10 tubes on each ride?

or would they somehow carry all the necessities to patch a tube? I have a glueless patch kit that does work, but it's useless on the side of the road because I usually can't find the hole. That's what happened this morning.

cheap frame pumps can't get my 32-630 (27") tires fully inflated, and partial inflation takes weeks of pumping. So I use CO2, but every time I've tried to release just a bit of CO2 to find a hole in an inner tube, it's ended up leaking and I've wasted a whole cylinder, in addition to not even finding the hole (no water to dunk it in). So now I only use CO2 to inflate good tubes.

carrying a ****** frame pump and soapy water in a spray bottle just to find holes in tubes seems crazy.

every time I've used a sealant like slime I've gotten a flat anyway and when I went to fix it had to deal with a gigantic mess inside the tire. I'm better off fixing double the flats with no mess, even if it means carrying a case of tubes.

I have those hard flexible plastic strips that go in the tire to shield the inner tube and thought about installing them. Of course that would be adding weight at the worst possible location on the bike. In the past I've gotten punctures right at the edges of the plastic strips.

I thought using gatorskin tires would be all I needed to do, and it does help tremendously, but I still get flats far too often.

So what do you do? End your ride at one flat? Contract a semi truck to follow you carrying a load of spare tubes?
2 tubes and a patch kit, 1 tube and a patch kit if I'm feeling lucky, and a RaceRocket on the upright WB mount.
wheelreason is offline  
Old 08-25-22, 02:54 PM
  #34  
Eds0123
Full Member
 
Eds0123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Spokane Area
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2021 Salsa Warbird, (Specially Love my) 2021 Salsa Cutthroat, 2012 Surly LHT, 2015 Surly Cross-Check, 2008 Giant OCR A1, 2005 Leader 735R, 2005 Gary Fisher Montare, 1991 Nishiki Pueblo,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 22 Posts
A Co-worker afraid of flats, he had tough heavy thick puncture resistant tires AND thick tire Liners AND slime in the tubes, all 3 prevention methods, resulting in a very rough ride,

Some other peole, on the other hand, thought themselves and know how to replace a tube or fix a flat very quickly in 5-7 minutes on the side of the road and enjoy the fun ride feel of folding supple
soft thin tires instead.

Last edited by Eds0123; 08-27-22 at 12:08 AM.
Eds0123 is offline  
Likes For Eds0123:
Old 08-27-22, 08:03 PM
  #35  
rsbob 
😵‍💫
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 3,725
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1444 Post(s)
Liked 2,671 Times in 1,537 Posts
When you have a hard time finding a leak in a tube, after you remove it from the tire pump it up like a big sausage. Often you can hear the leak, or just turn the tube slowly with the outer portion pointed to your face or other hand to feel the air leak. Still having a hard time? Use spit to locate the bubbles coming out of the sausage. Dry and patch.

Always carry one tube, patch kit and tire irons and tire boot (like a folded dollar bill)
__________________
“No regerts” 🚴🏾‍♂️. Hanlon's razor states, "Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."
Road and Mountain


rsbob is offline  
Old 08-28-22, 11:13 AM
  #36  
LarrySellerz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 1,326
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1756 Post(s)
Liked 331 Times in 238 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
My hearing is not very good, so I hold the tube near my cheek and rotate it. That just seems to be the part of me that is most sensitive and hence allows me to detect a leak. It's also close enough to my ears that, if it's a big leak, I can sometimes hear it.
i use my tongue (its the most sensitive along with the eyeball) when trying to feel air. Without actually licking the tube if that wasnt obvious. Or some water on your hand and look for bubbles. You dont need a tub or snoop (soap water) alcohol or even just water with a bit of spit works fine.
LarrySellerz is offline  
Likes For LarrySellerz:
Old 08-28-22, 12:07 PM
  #37  
Yan 
Senior Member
 
Yan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,395
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 999 Post(s)
Liked 242 Times in 159 Posts
Topeak Road Morph pump. Good old traditional glue patches. Never failed me on the side of the road.
Yan is offline  
Likes For Yan:
Old 08-28-22, 12:20 PM
  #38  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Why don't you lick it? When I'm patching indoors and find the hole with my ear or cheek, I touch the very tip of my tongue to the hole. It makes an oval of saliva that will dry from center out if you were accurate. I mark the spot before it dries and continue with the patch.

this morning I tried to find a slow leak in a tube but I was outside and all I could hear was roaring and howling. I had three spare tubes for that reason. F wind
tessellahedron is offline  
Old 08-28-22, 12:26 PM
  #39  
79pmooney
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,243

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3832 Post(s)
Liked 2,696 Times in 1,761 Posts
Originally Posted by rsbob View Post
When you have a hard time finding a leak in a tube, after you remove it from the tire pump it up like a big sausage. Often you can hear the leak, or just turn the tube slowly with the outer portion pointed to your face or other hand to feel the air leak. Still having a hard time? Use spit to locate the bubbles coming out of the sausage. Dry and patch.

Always carry one tube, patch kit and tire irons and tire boot (like a folded dollar bill)
I haven't folded the bills. I just use more than one. (I needed 5 once for a big gash.) Now I'm going for a ride where booting will be impractical. Just peel and replace. Sewups. Different world.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 08-28-22, 05:05 PM
  #40  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts

State Line Ditch road, technically in Nebraska. Gatorskins at lower pressure worked great and zero flats (that i know of) .

Unmaintained farm road, looks like a paved public road on Google but it is not. It was an excellent ride and fortunately i didn't get shot for trespassing, nor did i get any flats (that i know of).

Another road on Google maps that is clearly not a public street. This road was awesome. The water in the ditch was singing, the vegetation was thriving and full of insects, butterflies and birds. It felt cooler too. But then i got 7 flats! And the road is only a mile or two long.

It looks dead in the picture but back in there just a little everything is lush and green. It was great, then the front went flat. I couldn't find the hole (howling wind) and hadn't had the idea of sticking the over inflated tube down my pants yet, so I just got out a spare tube. But when I went to check the tire for sharp stuff on the inside, I found many thorns. In roughly 1/3 of the tire I picked out 38 thorns. Then I got frustrated and decided any thorn of small diameter that didn't penetrate the inside of the tire would just be left alone. I still ended up picking out 53 total.

I'm not sure of the best balance between not picking the tire to death and being sure I don't leave a thorn that will cause a flat later. (I once got a flat because of a thorn, while riding on my stationary trainer. The thorn had been there a long time but I had just topped up my tire pressure and it popped like 20 minutes into a workout I think. )

There were no problems for the rest of the ride, though my back tire seemed slightly soft at the end. About 90 minutes after getting home I noticed my back tire was completely flat.

I pulled it apart and the tire had thorns pretty bad but nothing like the front tire had been. I picked out most of the threatening looking ones, trying not to damage the tire. But the tubes are what blew my mind.

The back tube has 3 punctures and the one I removed from the front mid-ride has 4. Those are what I can find using a pump and my tongue. I usually get them all but the water dunk comes after the patches and then I'll know for sure. With 7 punctures I needed to stop and figure out how to improve things so this doesn't happen again

Today was my first dirt ride and of the 39 miles I'm fairly certain most of the thorns and punctures occurred in the vicinity of the third picture above, but I can't be sure.

So my questions for mountain bikers and people who bike on dirt roads are:
-Do you pick thorns out of your tires or leave them?
-Is there a way i can ride that road without flats or do I just have to avoid the area?
-Is there a better way than trial and error to know what areas to avoid?
-I hate slime sealant because when it doesn't work I can't even patch the tube; it's so messy it goes right in the trash. Am I using it wrong or something? I tried it multiple times about 15 years ago.
-Would these thorns be a problem for tubeless tires? (Not that I'll put them on that $75 ten speed, but I'm bike shopping)

I have those protective strips that go in the tire and if they had been installed and properly centered on this ride, they would have blocked 5 of the 7 thorns that punctured the tubes. So I'm installing them for the first time in years. I think for the riding I do it will be worth the extra spinning mass to have them.

I now carry three tubes if my pannier if empty. Did you know carrying a rain poncho while hiking actually prevents rain? I wish it worked with spare tubes.

as always your advice is appreciated
tessellahedron is offline  
Old 08-28-22, 08:45 PM
  #41  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
After patching the 7 flats I noticed the front was flat again too. I only found one hole, but when I went back and tested the patched tubes I found another one. The back tube that had three punctures also had one more, but that front tube where I initially found 4 punctures, had 5 more when I pumped it up really big (not counting one failed patch). So that's 9 punctures.

A sane person would throw that tube away, and probably the one with 4 holes too. Meaning this one ride completely destroyed two tubes and put over 50 thorns in a new tire.

there's gotta be a better way to ride on dirt roads.
tessellahedron is offline  
Old 08-29-22, 05:38 AM
  #42  
Eds0123
Full Member
 
Eds0123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Spokane Area
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2021 Salsa Warbird, (Specially Love my) 2021 Salsa Cutthroat, 2012 Surly LHT, 2015 Surly Cross-Check, 2008 Giant OCR A1, 2005 Leader 735R, 2005 Gary Fisher Montare, 1991 Nishiki Pueblo,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
After patching the 7 flats I noticed the front was flat again too. I only found one hole, but when I went back and tested the patched tubes I found another one. The back tube that had three punctures also had one more, but that front tube where I initially found 4 punctures, had 5 more when I pumped it up really big (not counting one failed patch). So that's 9 punctures.

A sane person would throw that tube away, and probably the one with 4 holes too. Meaning this one ride completely destroyed two tubes and put over 50 thorns in a new tire.

there's gotta be a better way to ride on dirt roads.
Tire liners?
Eds0123 is offline  
Likes For Eds0123:
Old 08-29-22, 06:31 AM
  #43  
tessellahedron
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I installed liners last night and am about to ride. Hopefully they're centered, I can never tell.

Unfortunately the tires I inflated to 70psi shortly before midnight read 50psi and 23psi just now (about 7 hours later). I either missed a couple holes or what they say about tubes with more than 5 patches always slow leaking is true.
tessellahedron is offline  
Old 08-29-22, 08:19 AM
  #44  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,829

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5232 Post(s)
Liked 2,789 Times in 1,645 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
I installed liners last night and am about to ride. Hopefully they're centered, I can never tell.

Unfortunately the tires I inflated to 70psi shortly before midnight read 50psi and 23psi just now (about 7 hours later). I either missed a couple holes or what they say about tubes with more than 5 patches always slow leaking is true.
You missed some holes. I’ve got tubes with 20 to 30 patches that hold air just fine.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 08-29-22, 09:58 AM
  #45  
63rickert
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2,068
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1087 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 244 Posts
Just measured a Rema patch kit. 7cm by 3.5cm by 2cm. For the metrically challenged that is 2.8" by 1.4" by 0.8". A bit over 3 cubic inches.

Use tires you can get off the rim. Preferably without needing tools. If more than one tire lever is required you are punishing yourself. If removing the tire requires force, sweating, cursing, you won't have the mental clarity to find the hole. Wider rim and wider tire works better in most cases.

If you just can't carry a frame pump (some bikes do make that improbable) try the Barbieri Nana or Nuda pumps. The Nana is the size of a large pen. Yes, you won't likely get over 50psi. If that doesn't get you home you should be riding wider tires.

So far calendar 2022 I've covered 4000 miles and had one flat. Last year had two flats. Perhaps if continuous flats are plaguing you there is a reason. Riding unpaved on skinny tires, riding in thorn country, yeah, you could have problems. Redundant layers of armor are not the solution.

Energy bar wrappers or any similar packaging material make excellent boot patches. Use the whole thing bead to bead.
63rickert is offline  
Likes For 63rickert:
Old 08-29-22, 12:53 PM
  #46  
Eds0123
Full Member
 
Eds0123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Spokane Area
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2021 Salsa Warbird, (Specially Love my) 2021 Salsa Cutthroat, 2012 Surly LHT, 2015 Surly Cross-Check, 2008 Giant OCR A1, 2005 Leader 735R, 2005 Gary Fisher Montare, 1991 Nishiki Pueblo,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
.

Use tires you can get off the rim. Preferably without needing tools. If more than one tire lever is required you are punishing yourself. If removing the tire requires force, sweating, cursing, you won't have the mental clarity to find the hole. Wider rim and wider tire works better in most cases.
.
+1
Folding tires are much easier to get off and put back on the rims, can be done without tire irons, make it easy, make it not such a big deal getting a flat fixed and enjoy your ride.

I live and ride daily in Goat Head country. Folding Tires, light liners help tremendously. Occasionally I still get flats maybe once a year. putting a new tube take me only 5 - 7 minutes and back on the road rolling no problem,
Eds0123 is offline  
Likes For Eds0123:
Old 08-29-22, 01:04 PM
  #47  
Milton Keynes
Senior Member
 
Milton Keynes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3,921

Bikes: Trek 1100 road bike, Roadmaster gravel/commuter/beater mountain bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2258 Post(s)
Liked 1,678 Times in 921 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
I hear about people with better setups who can get numerous flats and keep riding, so I'm trying to figure out how to do that.

do they carry 10 tubes on each ride?
Just carry a patch kit. I personally prefer the glue-on patches rather than the skabs, because it seems like the stick-on skabs don't seem to hold up on high pressure tires tubes as well as glued patches.

But yeah, if I have a flat I'll swap out the tubes (and of course making sure to find anything poking through the tire) and then go on. If I have a second flat then I'll patch the tube and maybe patch the tube I pulled out previously in case I need to swap it. No need to carry multiple tubes as long as you have a patch kit.
Milton Keynes is offline  
Likes For Milton Keynes:
Old 08-29-22, 01:16 PM
  #48  
Milton Keynes
Senior Member
 
Milton Keynes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3,921

Bikes: Trek 1100 road bike, Roadmaster gravel/commuter/beater mountain bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2258 Post(s)
Liked 1,678 Times in 921 Posts
Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
the cheap Slime "Skabs" turned out to be generally worthless.
Glueless patches seem to work best on mid-pressure hybrid,/trail type tires (30-50psi) and on tread-side punctures
I haven't found them to be very effective on high pressure tires, like the 700x25's on my road bike which I keep inflated to about 85 PSI. I'm old school in that I prefer glue-on patches. Unfortunately the local Walmart no longer seems to carry the actual patch kits and instead only offer the Skabs which I detest, but a local hardware store still has bicycle patch kits so I'll run in there and get one or two every so often.
Milton Keynes is offline  
Old 08-29-22, 02:10 PM
  #49  
prj71
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,205
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2673 Post(s)
Liked 957 Times in 627 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
I carry CO2 and a spare tube to avoid getting stranded but once it's installed I have to turn around because another flat would leave me stuck.
Buy some of these and you won't have to turn around. In addition to one tube, I carry a pack of these on every bike. And they work just as good as a glue on patch without the mess.

https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-Pre...s%2C143&sr=8-2
prj71 is offline  
Old 08-29-22, 02:17 PM
  #50  
prj71
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,205
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2673 Post(s)
Liked 957 Times in 627 Posts
Originally Posted by tessellahedron View Post
After patching the 7 flats I noticed the front was flat again too. I only found one hole, but when I went back and tested the patched tubes I found another one. The back tube that had three punctures also had one more, but that front tube where I initially found 4 punctures, had 5 more when I pumped it up really big (not counting one failed patch). So that's 9 punctures.

A sane person would throw that tube away, and probably the one with 4 holes too. Meaning this one ride completely destroyed two tubes and put over 50 thorns in a new tire.

there's gotta be a better way to ride on dirt roads.
There is a better way. Looking at your pictures above you have the wrong bike and tires for where you are riding. At minimum you should be riding a gravel bike that has better puncture resistant tires with a tubeless setup. The sealant will seal the holes while you are riding.
prj71 is offline  
Likes For prj71:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.