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V-brakes vs. Center-pull brakes

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V-brakes vs. Center-pull brakes

Old 11-16-22, 10:45 AM
  #26  
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With the advent of disc brakes this question becomes moot. It is like asking if white or brown horses pull the wagon better.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:09 AM
  #27  
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I don't remember any centerpull or cantilevers fondly. I replace canti's without hesitation and have been doing so since linears came into being. Just yesterday I put a set of mini-V's on the Fantom Cross. Works for me.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:15 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
With the advent of disc brakes this question becomes moot. It is like asking if white or brown horses pull the wagon better.
Not really. The existence of disc brakes has not eliminated the existence of other types of brakes.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:16 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by rsbob View Post
A. Not so humble brag

B OP shaming

C Itís just the truth and I am happy that everyone now knows it.

D All of the above

E None of the above
He's making the point that if you use your brakes correctly you won't go "flying over the bars".
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Old 11-16-22, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
An advantage of linear pull brakes is that the braking response is linear over the life of the pads. Thus the name. With cantilevers, response varies with pad wear. If, as the OP said, you shorten the cable or move the yoke up the cable, braking power lessens. Keeping cantilevers adjusted correctly takes a little more work. But keeping BSO linear brakes adjusted takes more work, too.
Sorry but no. ďLinearĒ brakes are called that because the cable pulls linearly across the brake arms instead of vertically like almost all other cable actuated brakes. Shimano made some brakes that moved kept the pads oriented in the same plane as the rim but those never caught one. Likely because they were too flexible and squealed horribly.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:34 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
An advantage of linear pull brakes is that the braking response is linear over the life of the pads. Thus the name. With cantilevers, response varies with pad wear. If, as the OP said, you shorten the cable or move the yoke up the cable, braking power lessens. Keeping cantilevers adjusted correctly takes a little more work. But keeping BSO linear brakes adjusted takes more work, too.
Wrong.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:49 AM
  #32  
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I've had vee brakes on a mountain bike and 2 of my ex's mountain bikes. Even the cheaper ones can work pretty well with good pads, as long as they aren't those super flexy things. Seems to me the OP should be able to get them working acceptably with good pads and careful set-up. If not, better vee brakes are relatively cheap. Probably even used stuff out there.
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Old 11-16-22, 03:01 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Eric F View Post
Not really. The existence of disc brakes has not eliminated the existence of other types of brakes.
Give them time.
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Old 11-16-22, 03:12 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Give them time.
Hmmm...It's been 40+ years since single-pivot caliper brakes were current technology on new bicycles. Yet, they are still in existence, and are still used on many thousands of bikes. Other brake types (besides discs) will still exist long after both of us are gone.
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Old 11-16-22, 03:16 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
You won't go 'flying over the bars' if you know how to use your brakes. Do you lock up the rear and skid every time you use the rear brake? Millions of people use linear pull brakes and don't go over the bars. Millions of people use disc brakes and don't go flying over the bars. What is with this irrational fear of front brakes?
I believe this fear is based on either bad experiences as a kid riding a bike and going over the bars or just never learning how to apply brakes correctly. It's like anything else, you have to learn. But many people are still inherently fearful of their front brake regardless of brake type.
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Old 11-16-22, 03:52 PM
  #36  
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V-brakes offer more power and better modulation over center-pull/cantilever brakes, and also contain fewer parts. V-brakes do require more frequent adjustment, which takes no time once you get used to them. Higher quality v-brakes offer light lever pressure, and great stopping power with only one or two fingers.

The only adjustments required are the tension screws, which maintain the pad gap and equalize the levers, and occasional cable adjustments as the pads wear. Good levers and cables make the brakes themselves work better.
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Old 11-16-22, 04:14 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
V-brakes offer more power and better modulation over center-pull/cantilever brakes, and also contain fewer parts. V-brakes do require more frequent adjustment, which takes no time once you get used to them. Higher quality v-brakes offer light lever pressure, and great stopping power with only one or two fingers.

The only adjustments required are the tension screws, which maintain the pad gap and equalize the levers, and occasional cable adjustments as the pads wear. Good levers and cables make the brakes themselves work better.
And you have to adjust pad position as they wear helically. They don't wear flat unless you have XTR/XT brakes w/ the linkage.
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Old 11-16-22, 04:47 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Centerpulls were popular in the 90s?...where, Cambodia?
I bet there were still millions of bikes with centerpulls being rode and/or being sold (for a song) that were totally serviceable. I admit this far into the 21st century those bikes are a little more rare, but I still see them on craigslist everyday. Of course on new bikes they have been extinct for 30 plus years.
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Old 11-16-22, 04:47 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
With the advent of disc brakes this question becomes moot.
Except it isn't moot at all. The "advent" was about 1992, when the first mass-produced mountain bike with disc brakes was introduced. Thirty years later, we still have coaster brakes, cantilever brakes, U-brakes, hydraulic rim brakes, V-brakes, and caliper brakes, and bikes that use these brakes continue to be produced by the thousands.

Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Give them time
We have.
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Old 11-16-22, 04:53 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by HelpSingularity View Post
I bet there were still millions of bikes with centerpulls being rode and/or being sold (for a song) that were totally serviceable. I admit this far into the 21st century those bikes are a little more rare, but I still see them on craigslist everyday. Of course on new bikes they have been extinct for 30 plus years.
Good lord, an obvious throw away joking post gets this much pushback. Classic Bikeforums.
Of course there were a bunch of bikes with centerpull brakes being ridden in the 90s.
But no, that wasn't a popular style of brake in the 90s.

Cantilever brakes? Popularly used.
Side pull? Popularly used.
Vbrake? Popularly used.

Centerpulls were not the standard in the 90s, contrary to the OP'S comment and your response.
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Old 11-16-22, 05:02 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Good lord, an obvious throw away joking post gets this much pushback. Classic Bikeforums.
Of course there were a bunch of bikes with centerpull brakes being ridden in the 90s.
But no, that wasn't a popular style of brake in the 90s.

Cantilever brakes? Popularly used.
Side pull? Popularly used.
Vbrake? Popularly used.

Centerpulls were not the standard in the 90s, contrary to the OP'S comment and your response.
Sorry about that, that did go swoosh right over my head. I should have said used bikes in my response. You are absolutely correct that centerpulls were not standard in the nineties. I only commented because I see sometimes that younger people might have a skewed sense of history and I just wanted to clear that up a little. Being a geezer I tend to do that sometimes. Again my apologies.
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Old 11-16-22, 06:08 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
You have what is most likely the worst 'linear pull' brakes on the planet. They are nearly impossible to keep adjusted properly. Get some decent brakes and they'll be much better. You won't go 'flying over the bars' if you know how to use your brakes. Do you lock up the rear and skid every time you use the rear brake? Millions of people use linear pull brakes and don't go over the bars. Millions of people use disc brakes and don't go flying over the bars. What is with this irrational fear of front brakes?
I am just saying: you only need so much stopping power. Center pull brakes seemed to give me all the stopping power I needed, without the headache of V-brakes.
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Old 11-16-22, 06:11 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Milton Keynes View Post
And as far as removing a wheel, it's quite easy to undo the V-brakes to allow you to take the wheel out, and hook them back up once you've replaced it.
Yes, but these brakes seem to need to be re-adjusted if I look at the wrong. I never had that issue with center-pull brakes.
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Old 11-16-22, 07:03 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by walterbyrd View Post
I am just saying: you only need so much stopping power. Center pull brakes seemed to give me all the stopping power I needed, without the headache of V-brakes.
We still arenít sure if you are talking about center pull brakes or cantilever brakes. If you want cantilevers on your current bike, itís not impossible to swap them. Youíll need short pull levers, a way to hang the cables on the front and rear, and the brakes. Alternatively, Iíd suggest just replacing the current crappy brakes with better ones. You can find Avid Single Digits for cheap on Ebay or buy TRP new ones for about $25 per pair. Itíd be cheaper to go that route.
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Old 11-16-22, 08:53 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
V-brakes offer more power and better modulation over center-pull/cantilever brakes, and also contain fewer parts. V-brakes do require more frequent adjustment, which takes no time once you get used to them. Higher quality v-brakes offer light lever pressure, and great stopping power with only one or two fingers.

The only adjustments required are the tension screws, which maintain the pad gap and equalize the levers, and occasional cable adjustments as the pads wear. Good levers and cables make the brakes themselves work better.
> The only adjustments required are the tension screws

I have found that adjustment to be tricky. If it is not done exactly right, the brakes will not center correctly after releasing, and one pad will rub against the rim. That is a problem that I did not have, even with the cheapest center-pull brakes.

With center-pull, there is one spring pulling the pads apart. No need to synchronize two separate spring tensions, and get each one pulling with just the right amount of tension.

With my V-brakes, even after getting the spring tension adjusted for both springs, it seems to go out of adjustment very easily. Sometimes, for no apparent reason at all.

Perfectly adjusted V-brakes my provide better stopping power. But they seem to be a constant headache to keep adjusted, and really, there is only so much stopping power you need.
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Old 11-16-22, 09:00 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Give them time.
You may be right. But it seems to me that disc brakes do not have every advantage. Disc brakes are more expensive, heavier, and - I would think - more difficult to adjust and maintain.

If you frequently ride in wet conditions, I would think that disc brakes would be worth it. Otherwise, I'm not so sure.
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Old 11-16-22, 09:07 PM
  #47  
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I should have mentioned, back in the early 1990s, I rode the racer type street bikes, not MTBs. I did not ride especially expensive bikes, one was a department store bike, the other was a lower-end Schwinn. I never did an in-depth study of what types of brakes bicycles used back then, but when I was bike shopping, the center-pull brakes seemed to be standard.
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Old 11-16-22, 09:14 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
You can find Avid Single Digits for cheap on Ebay
Except the 7's. I think SRAM discontinued them after the recall. Good brakes. The 5's are decent, but I never liked the 3's, which are the cheap ones on eBay.

I guess the T4000 is Shimano only offering. Not sure how they compare.

John
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Old 11-16-22, 10:10 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by walterbyrd View Post
You may be right. But it seems to me that disc brakes do not have every advantage. Disc brakes are more expensive, heavier, and - I would think - more difficult to adjust and maintain.

If you frequently ride in wet conditions, I would think that disc brakes would be worth it. Otherwise, I'm not so sure.
Disc brakes may not be needed for a lot of road riders but they are not a hassle to me. I've had them on 2 mountain bikes since 1998.
Like other types of brakes, you get what you pay for.
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Old 11-16-22, 11:32 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
Which is why, when you mount them under your chain stays, you call them "U-brakes"
But only us whippersnappers remember these

Aha! Mud-collection devices that also double as speed reducers.
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