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Canyon Aeroad CF SL 8 Disc

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Canyon Aeroad CF SL 8 Disc

Old 01-16-23, 08:52 AM
  #1  
Zest49
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Canyon Aeroad CF SL 8 Disc

Hi all,
I've just ordered this bike ready to be delivered in March. They come with 25-mm Continental Grand Prix 5000 tyres.
I do a few 100 mile sportives outside of winter and also daily commute (30 mile round trip, a few times per week) throughout inner London in suitable weather conditions only. For the past few years I've been riding a Cannondale Synapse and strictly used Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres. They have been perfect as I only ever got 1 puncture a year at most. Of course these Canyon wheels are a lot smoother, and the ride will be also, however I was wondering which tyres people would recommend? I'd ideally like to find the perfect balance between ride quality/smoothness and puncture resistance. Many thanks in advance for your experience!
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Old 01-16-23, 09:47 AM
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Congrats! Hot bike!
The GP5000 (and 4000) have been very reliable and I'm still set up with tubes.
Pretty cool that Canyon has 25s on the front and 28s on the back.
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Old 01-16-23, 10:19 AM
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A lot of newer bikes come with tubeless rims. If your Canyon came with tubeless rims which donít require taping, I would just go straight to tubeless 28mm tires.
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Old 01-16-23, 10:46 AM
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GP5000 is a great tire. I'd recommend you just ride those.
I ride in urban conditions on GP5000's all the time and don't find them to be any more prone to punctures than other tires I've used. I prefer the tubeless variety, but have used tubed GP5000's for several years with good success.

Congrats on the new bike.
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Old 01-16-23, 01:08 PM
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If flat tires are a concern, simply convert to tubeless. The GP 5000's on the bike are probably tubeless ready and the rims may well be already taped. This was the case for my Canyon Grizl which I received early last February. The Schwalbe tires it came with were tubeless ready and the DT Swiss wheels were taped. I simply removed the inner tubes and installed tubeless valves which I already had. I then popped the tires back on and inflated. Took about 10 minutes for both wheels. The tires held air overnight so I injected the sealant the next morning. Rode trouble free all last summer with no flats and no worries
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Old 01-16-23, 04:08 PM
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You use your road bike as a commuter bike? And where you keep it during the day?
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Old 01-16-23, 11:59 PM
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Zest49
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I havenít used tubeless before so would be quite worried starting out right now. May do in the future after some practice etc.

My bike is left in my work building, behind a few different coded areas/doors as the building has to be overly secure anyway due to the nature of our work.

Thanks all, guess I shouldnít chop and change anything just yet then!
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Old 01-18-23, 01:53 PM
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alcjphil
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Originally Posted by Zest49 View Post
I havenít used tubeless before so would be quite worried starting out right now. May do in the future after some practice etc.
!
If you have never run road tubeless tires I can understand a certain reluctance to convert. However as a 13 year road tubeless user I can state that it simply isn't that difficult if the wheels are already taped. Canyon has a video on their website that clearly explains how to do it. The only way to acquire practice is to actually convert. No amount of installing inner tubes will help you. One thing to note: Installing inner tubes in tubeless ready tires on tubeless ready wheels can actually be much more difficult than regular clinchers on non tubeless ready rims. That is why I converted my Grizl when I received it last February. The actual conversion was every bit as easy as the video on the Canyon website. One thing that I have noticed over the years is that road tubeless tires are becoming easier to install. When I first installed road tubeless tires there was only one manufacturer (Hutchinson) actually making road tubeless tires and there were some initial difficulties both for installation and for reliability. Competition and experience have combined to make big improvements. My last set of Hutchinson Fusion5 tires were actually easier to install than the same tire in a tube type version on another set of wheels on another bike
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Old 01-18-23, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Zest49 View Post
I havenít used tubeless before so would be quite worried starting out right now. May do in the future after some practice etc.
The real tricky part in going tubeless, is the taping. If the rim was already pre-taped from the factory, or better yet- closed deck with no spoke holes, then the hard part has already taken care off. Getting the tire bead to seat can be time consuming as well, but it is a straightforward routine. You just have to follow the steps one by one.
The other caveat is that tubeless works best when the tire pressure is not too high. So get the widest tire that can fit in the frame so you can run at a lower pressure.
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Old 01-18-23, 05:39 PM
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Converting my Canyon Inflite AL to tubeless was dead simple, the tires it came with were already tubeless ready (the GP 5000 on yours might not be since there are separate clincher only and tubeless versions) and Canyon provided the tubeless valves. I already had sealant and a valve core removal tool.

I have a 31 mile round-trip commute on that Inflite during the rainy season with Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR tires, then my nicer road bike with GP 5000 S TRs the rest of the year. Will never go back to inner tubes and the associated punctures and pinch flats that come with it on these roads.
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Old 01-18-23, 08:18 PM
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Depends what comes with the bike I suppose but Iíll definitely be looking up those videos then!
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Old 01-18-23, 08:26 PM
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Gents,
You've convinced me to convert my Endurance to tubeless. The GPs it came with are the S TR, so it's just 'fear of the new' holding me back.
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Old 01-19-23, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by BTinNYC View Post
Gents,
You've convinced me to convert my Endurance to tubeless. The GPs it came with are the S TR, so it's just 'fear of the new' holding me back.
I converted mine before the first ride. It was painless with the GP 5000 S TR on DT Swiss carbon rims. They seated easier than any other tubeless tyre/rim combination I've run. Didn't even need my boost pump to inflate first time. Had zero flats on them last season.
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Old 01-20-23, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Zest49 View Post
Hi all,
I've just ordered this bike ready to be delivered in March. They come with 25-mm Continental Grand Prix 5000 tyres.
I do a few 100 mile sportives outside of winter and also daily commute (30 mile round trip, a few times per week) throughout inner London in suitable weather conditions only. For the past few years I've been riding a Cannondale Synapse and strictly used Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres. They have been perfect as I only ever got 1 puncture a year at most. Of course these Canyon wheels are a lot smoother, and the ride will be also, however I was wondering which tyres people would recommend? I'd ideally like to find the perfect balance between ride quality/smoothness and puncture resistance. Many thanks in advance for your experience!
I can't believe you been doing sportives on Marathon Plus tyres. You won't believe how much faster you'll go on GP 5000s, with or without tubes.

If you want to stick with tubes, I've been trying out Muc-Off inner tube sealant, and it seems to work pretty well. Ideally you'd need to get inner tubes with removable valve cores. Schwalbe and Impac tubes fit the bill. I've had two punctures since I started using it. In one case it turned what would have been a very fast puncture into a very slow one, taking hours to home. In the other, it was a slow puncture which sealed after being pumped up three or four times over the course of a few days.
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Old 01-20-23, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
I can't believe you been doing sportives on Marathon Plus tyres. You won't believe how much faster you'll go on GP 5000s, with or without tubes.

If you want to stick with tubes, I've been trying out Muc-Off inner tube sealant, and it seems to work pretty well. Ideally you'd need to get inner tubes with removable valve cores. Schwalbe and Impac tubes fit the bill. I've had two punctures since I started using it. In one case it turned what would have been a very fast puncture into a very slow one, taking hours to home. In the other, it was a slow puncture which sealed after being pumped up three or four times over the course of a few days.
I think the OP may as well go the full hog to tubeless given that the rims and tyres in question are ready to trot. For me, the big advantage of tubeless over tubes with sealant is the ability to fire in a plug from the outside if a puncture doesn't seal instantly. I carry a Dynaplug kit for that purpose. That method is not going to work with sealant in tubes.
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Old 01-20-23, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I think the OP may as well go the full hog to tubeless given that the rims and tyres in question are ready to trot. For me, the big advantage of tubeless over tubes with sealant is the ability to fire in a plug from the outside if a puncture doesn't seal instantly. I carry a Dynaplug kit for that purpose. That method is not going to work with sealant in tubes.
That is true. I've gone tubeless on my mountain bike and carry a plug kit for that, which I've had to use a couple of times. I've only ever once, in thousands of miles of cycling, had a puncture that big in a road tyre, and that was in the sidewall where I wouldn't have been happy plugging it in any case. Yes, I think in his position I think I might well go tubeless, but I think the argument isn't as strong for road bikes as for mountain bikes. I can understand the OP's caution.
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Old 01-20-23, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
That is true. I've gone tubeless on my mountain bike and carry a plug kit for that, which I've had to use a couple of times. I've only ever once, in thousands of miles of cycling, had a puncture that big in a road tyre, and that was in the sidewall where I wouldn't have been happy plugging it in any case. Yes, I think in his position I think I might well go tubeless, but I think the argument isn't as strong for road bikes as for mountain bikes. I can understand the OP's caution.
Last season I had to resort to plugging one tubeless tyre that had a particularly nasty cut going into the sidewall (I ran over some sharp metal debris). I had to put in no less than 3 standard Dynaplugs to seal it, but it was good enough to ride 20 miles home. Granted that was a one-off for road riding, but it did the job. I've been running mtb tubeless since 2004 and road tubeless since 2019. I've never once had to resort to removing a tyre by the road/trailside. I've stopped carrying a spare tube for road riding, except on epic rides.
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Old 01-20-23, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Zest49 View Post
I havenít used tubeless before so would be quite worried starting out right now. May do in the future after some practice etc.
There's no substitute for first hand experience, so you might want to try it sometime. Some people think tubeless is fabulous, but others don't. YMMV.
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Old 01-22-23, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee View Post
The real tricky part in going tubeless, is the taping. If the rim was already pre-taped from the factory, or better yet- closed deck with no spoke holes, then the hard part has already taken care off. Getting the tire bead to seat can be time consuming as well, but it is a straightforward routine. You just have to follow the steps one by one.
The other caveat is that tubeless works best when the tire pressure is not too high. So get the widest tire that can fit in the frame so you can run at a lower pressure.
I would add to that to tighten the valves properly. I couldn't set my tyres even with a booster for ages, couldn't figure out why, and then I finally examined closer and heard a whooshing sound and sure enough, air was coming out of the hole in the rims (I believe many carbon rims have a hole, I forgot why) and I was where is this coming from. Until I took the tyre off again and checked everything and discovered I had not properly tightened the valve, for fear of damage. But I screwed a little tighter and problem gone.
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