Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

My luck can't be that bad, can it? Can it???

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

My luck can't be that bad, can it? Can it???

Old 01-19-23, 04:23 PM
  #26  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,446

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Liked 9,386 Times in 4,336 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
Take a cotton ball and rub it around on the inside of the tire. If there is something there the cotton ball will catch it. Make sure there are no spokes poking though the rim strip and into the tube.

Get yourself this patch kit. You'll never mess with old school glue patches again after using these.

https://www.parktool.com/en-us/produ...patch-kit-gp-2
These are fine to get you home but are NOT designed to be permanent. Old school patches using vulcanizing fluid "glue" are best done at home, batch-patch style, for a permanent fix.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 01-19-23, 04:37 PM
  #27  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 18,862

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Liked 12,732 Times in 6,534 Posts
Originally Posted by zandoval
Yep... And ya do carry a spare tube... Before I went to Continental Ride Tour tires I was getting flats every now and then. I don't carry a spare tube but still think I should. I do carry a small hand pump, and a Mini Patch kit in which I have added an unopened tube of Super Glue along with the vulcanizing cement, tooth pick, razor blade, and a scab patch. I prefer the Lezyne type mini pump. Its not much bigger then your CO2 device. Ha... Ya probably won't get another flat for years to come. Also, some times with flats it's just your turn...


Amazon
My pump is a Lezyne Road Drive that's similar to that one. It works, and it'll do a pretty high pressure - EVENTUALLY! It takes A LOT of strokes! When I'm close to the pressure I want, I do 20 strokes, then check, then 20 more, etc.

I only use it when riding my CF bikes that won't fit a frame pump. The other bikes, I have 3 frame pumps in different sizes, so I have pumps for any bike I ride.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Likes For genejockey:
Old 01-19-23, 08:57 PM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 7,037
Liked 1,339 Times in 850 Posts
Originally Posted by VegasJen
The bane of my existence, and probably the source of greater than 80% of all the punctures I've ever had have been the steel belts from auto tires. ...
Same here. And sometimes very hard to detect on the side of the road when one's patience is not up to the task. I've certainly been there (second flat). Fortunately, like you, the time it happened, it was a slow enough leak that I limped along re-inflating a couple of times just to avoid needing to patch the spare tube when it went. I learned to be more obsessive about those GD little occult flatteners! And can find them with my fingers ... because I know something is there and just keep at it until I find it.
Camilo is offline  
Old 01-19-23, 08:59 PM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 7,037
Liked 1,339 Times in 850 Posts
Originally Posted by fishboat
"My luck can't be that bad, can it? Can it???"

Luck falls to those prepared to receive it.

You have a lot to learn and an attitude that prevents you from doing so.

Not a great combo.
Whaaaa?
Camilo is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 10:01 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,743
Liked 1,236 Times in 802 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas
These are fine to get you home but are NOT designed to be permanent. Old school patches using vulcanizing fluid "glue" are best done at home, batch-patch style, for a permanent fix.
I disagree because I have used these as a permanent solution many times. It's not like they all of sudden fall off or quit working. I no longer use glue patches since I found these.
prj71 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 10:07 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,606
Liked 922 Times in 519 Posts
prj71 I find 'glueless' patches to absolutely be less reliable and think they should only be used in emergencies. I am happy you, and some others, have a different experience than me, and many others, but I don't trust them and only use 'glued' patches.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 10:22 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 29,608

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Marin Muirwoods 29er, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Liked 3,618 Times in 2,365 Posts
yeah I carry a pump & at least 2 cartridges. usually 1 extra tube + patches

on longer rides, I carry another tube & 2 more cartridges

I have 3 bikes all w/ diff. size tires/tubes. so I have to remember to move the pump to the bike of the day & change the tube(s) in my trunk

luck = when preparation meets opportunity
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 10:44 AM
  #33  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,446

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Liked 9,386 Times in 4,336 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
I disagree because I have used these as a permanent solution many times. It's not like they all of sudden fall off or quit working. I no longer use glue patches since I found these.
Read what I wrote. They are not DESIGNED to be permanent. I expect some people get a more durable response (like you) but I maintain they are not really intended to be a permanent patch. As always, YMMV.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 10:53 AM
  #34  
Tragically Ignorant
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 15,612

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Liked 9,099 Times in 5,054 Posts
Originally Posted by fishboat
"My luck can't be that bad, can it? Can it???"

Luck falls to those prepared to receive it.

You have a lot to learn and an attitude that prevents you from doing so.

Not a great combo.
Originally Posted by big john
Seems kinda dickish.

I disagree with "Seems" and "kinda".


fishboat displays the classic "fundamental attribution error".
livedarklions is offline  
Likes For livedarklions:
Old 01-20-23, 11:02 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,814
Liked 9,669 Times in 4,738 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
I disagree because I have used these as a permanent solution many times. It's not like they all of sudden fall off or quit working. I no longer use glue patches since I found these.
I have had them blow off twice due to heat. One time I was driving with the bike in the back of the car and the stick on patch blew off. It was a hot day.
Another time I was descending a long hill using lots of brake and the stupid patch blew off from the heat.
big john is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 11:03 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,814
Liked 9,669 Times in 4,738 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions
I disagree with "Seems" and "kinda".
.
I was trying to be diplomatic. I agree with you, though.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 01-20-23, 11:10 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 648
Liked 38 Times in 32 Posts
Flats

Originally Posted by VegasJen
I did. I generally find a wire or cut or some such thing to explain why I have a flat. Not this time. I spent several minutes on the side of the road, running bare fingers on the inside of that casing, feeling for anything that might be stabbing the tube. Nothing found. At least not then. I'll spend some time this weekend and investigate more thoroughly and report my findings.
Been there, done that...I had one spring I thought my name might be FlatsALot lol. I had one that I couldn't feel anything, but I was getting one microscopic puncture, that didn't seem to present itself until there were a few miles on it...sometimes as many as 7-10. When I finally took the tire all the way off the rim, and ran a piece of cotton swab, it hooked on the tiniest of wires. Wire wasn't visible on the inside, or out, but was just enough to eventually puncture the tire. I had resisted removing the tire, because it was an absolute knuckle buster getting it on a rim.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 11:34 AM
  #38  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2021
Posts: 1,080
Liked 620 Times in 342 Posts
Originally Posted by Craptacular8
Been there, done that...I had one spring I thought my name might be FlatsALot lol. I had one that I couldn't feel anything, but I was getting one microscopic puncture, that didn't seem to present itself until there were a few miles on it...sometimes as many as 7-10. When I finally took the tire all the way off the rim, and ran a piece of cotton swab, it hooked on the tiniest of wires. Wire wasn't visible on the inside, or out, but was just enough to eventually puncture the tire. I had resisted removing the tire, because it was an absolute knuckle buster getting it on a rim.
Thanks for the cotton swab tip! I'll have to remember that.
VegasJen is offline  
Likes For VegasJen:
Old 01-20-23, 12:03 PM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 5,653

Bikes: Day6 Semi Recumbent "FIREBALL", 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Liked 837 Times in 524 Posts
Originally Posted by VegasJen
Thanks for the cotton swab tip! I'll have to remember that.
Cotton ball is also useful since it gets the entire inside from bead to bead as you pull it along. p.s. - providing it's not too big of a tire.
OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 12:22 PM
  #40  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 275
Liked 170 Times in 111 Posts
If you are willing to carry a pump on the frame (right next to a bottle cage), then consider getting the largest version of the Lezyne Road Drive. It can't match a full-sized frame pump, but it moves substantially more air per stroke than some of the really small mini pumps.

For conventional tube patching, I buy two of the Rema Tip Top TT 02 kits, and then combine some of the contents into one of the boxes to carry on the bike. That lets me have an open "in use" tube of cement, and also an unopened backup tube with me in case the "in use" one dries out. My current tube of cement has been in use for ~2-1/2 years.
John Valuk is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 12:38 PM
  #41  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 32

Bikes: Orbea Onyx, Surly Disc Trucker, Trek 850

Liked 19 Times in 11 Posts
I also carry a mini bic lighter in my pack. When I spread the glue out, I light it up for a few seconds before I put the patch on. Seals great.
Slasharoo is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 01:11 PM
  #42  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,563

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Liked 5,170 Times in 2,350 Posts
If it wasn't for bad luck,....I wouldn't have no luck at all!

Therefore, I always try to have a frame pump or minipump - AND extra CO2 cartridges. A spare tubular or 2 spare clincher tubes (depending on wheels) for extended rides. For off-road rides I include a small bottle of Stan's sealant. The little patch kits in my saddle bags are so old they should be replaced, but even new they will always be a last resort. Flats happen to us all - buying good rubber and replacing before tires are too worn is my added 'insurance policy' against roadside issues.
__________________
Vintage, modern, e-road. It is a big cycling universe.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 01:20 PM
  #43  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,743
Liked 1,236 Times in 802 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson
prj71 I find 'glueless' patches to absolutely be less reliable and think they should only be used in emergencies. I am happy you, and some others, have a different experience than me, and many others, but I don't trust them and only use 'glued' patches.
I've debated this on this forum once already and don't really care to debate it again.. I haven't had any issues with them after patching a tube and leaving it on for hundreds of miles of use, so I am happy that Park Tool has this solution.
prj71 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 01:26 PM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,743
Liked 1,236 Times in 802 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas
Read what I wrote. They are not DESIGNED to be permanent. I expect some people get a more durable response (like you) but I maintain they are not really intended to be a permanent patch. As always, YMMV.
Where does it say anywhere that they are not designed to be permanent? Do you have some facts to back this statement up or is that just your opinion?

Check the reviews here. Their experience mimics mine.

https://www.vitalmtb.com/product/gui...t-reviews-7701
prj71 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 01:26 PM
  #45  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2023
Posts: 23
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
How to determine if a mystery flat is caused by rim strip failure when there is no evidence of any road debris to the tire: This has happened to me on a brand new bike build that I did a few years ago. I built up a brand new Lynskey with all new components except the wheels. The wheels were built with Kinlin's lightest aluminum rims & had vittoria rim strips. The wheels come in at 1400 grams. So after a week of riding with no issues, the next week I was getting constant flats on the front wheel. Put a new tube in & pumped it up & a mile later another front flat??? I could find nothing in the tire & was perplexed because it was a brand new tire. Everything on the bike was brand new except the wheels. Got home fixed the tube & next day went out & flatted again 2 miles out. Fixed it on the roadside & thought I would continue on but flatted immediately.

When I got home because I line up all my tires up with the valve hole, I could tell that all the punctures were in the exact same spot of the wheel. This led me to believe that it was the rim strip. Looking at the rim strip alone, you couldn't visibly see that it was defective. Where each rim hole was, you could see its outline & you could see where the spoke had poked into the strip but it did not puncture it. So I decided to just replace it anyway & that solved my problem. Not one front wheel puncture since. So if the rim strip on your wheels is a few years old, its worthwhile to just change them if you start to get mystery flats in the same area with no evidence of debris. Again as I said before, glueless patches can be a lifesaver but they are only a temporary fix & need to be replaced with a permanent patch when time permits.

Last edited by stan01; 01-20-23 at 01:33 PM.
stan01 is offline  
Likes For stan01:
Old 01-20-23, 01:27 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 4,743
Liked 1,236 Times in 802 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
I have had them blow off twice due to heat. One time I was driving with the bike in the back of the car and the stick on patch blew off. It was a hot day.
Another time I was descending a long hill using lots of brake and the stupid patch blew off from the heat.
How is this even possible? The patch is literally sandwiched between the tube and tire. How can it "blow off"?
prj71 is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 01:57 PM
  #47  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,446

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Liked 9,386 Times in 4,336 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
Where does it say anywhere that they are not designed to be permanent? Do you have some facts to back this statement up or is that just your opinion?

Check the reviews here. Their experience mimics mine.

https://www.vitalmtb.com/product/gui...t-reviews-7701
I concede the point that the product description does not state anything about them being temporary.

You win!
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Likes For datlas:
Old 01-20-23, 02:17 PM
  #48  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 18,862

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Liked 12,732 Times in 6,534 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas
I concede the point that the product description does not state anything about them being temporary.

You win!
Play stupid games, win stupid prizes.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Likes For genejockey:
Old 01-20-23, 02:21 PM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,814
Liked 9,669 Times in 4,738 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
How is this even possible? The patch is literally sandwiched between the tube and tire. How can it "blow off"?
You know what I meant. The patch loosened enough to allow all of the air pressure to rush out and when I removed the tube from the tire the patch was loose.

Obviously it didn't come out and go flying across the landscape.
big john is offline  
Old 01-20-23, 02:22 PM
  #50  
Senior Member
 
spelger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: reno, nv
Posts: 2,355

Bikes: yes, i have one

Liked 1,208 Times in 706 Posts
Originally Posted by prj71
I disagree because I have used these as a permanent solution many times. It's not like they all of sudden fall off or quit working. I no longer use glue patches since I found these.
i've used these and they do work until they don't. after about a year or so they invariably leak. i've had to pull them off and replace with a correct vulcanizing patch, done right those don't seem to fail. i still keep them in my saddle bag along with a spare tube and a real patch kit. you never know how many goat heads will be thrown at you.
spelger is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.