Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Continental GP 5000

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Continental GP 5000

Old 05-25-23, 10:00 AM
  #26  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2023
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
Their German based factories have sometime produced garbage too when things got by the quality control. Continental also has many of it's tires made in India, Indonesia and other places too.

It's not really where the tire is made. It's all about how well the owners of the Brand holds the tolerances of the manufacturing processes no matter who does the actual manufacturing. And if the quality standards aren't checked by the Brand, then the makers will do whatever they can get away with.
Billydog is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 10:19 AM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
Bald Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Upstate SC
Posts: 1,737
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 842 Post(s)
Liked 1,696 Times in 798 Posts
Originally Posted by Billydog
Who can tell me what to expect from a pair of continental GP 5000?
I just bought a pair of continental GP 5000 for $100.
I can confidently say that you'll expect to see $100 missing from your wallet.

Other than that, it's all opinion.
Bald Paul is offline  
Likes For Bald Paul:
Old 05-25-23, 10:44 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,744
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4560 Post(s)
Liked 5,083 Times in 3,137 Posts
They are pretty much a benchmark tyre in their class. Fast rolling, reasonably supple, good grip on dry and wet roads and slightly above average puncture resistance (for a race tyre at least).
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 05-25-23, 10:56 AM
  #29  
Tragically Ignorant
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 15,613

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8186 Post(s)
Liked 9,099 Times in 5,054 Posts
I like 'em. Definitely a little harder to mount than other major brands, but nothing terribly difficult.

Let us know what you think after a few miles.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 10:58 AM
  #30  
Tragically Ignorant
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 15,613

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8186 Post(s)
Liked 9,099 Times in 5,054 Posts
Originally Posted by Bald Paul
I can confidently say that you'll expect to see $100 missing from your wallet.

Other than that, it's all opinion.

Wait, people carry cash in their wallets? Is that still a thing?
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 11:03 AM
  #31  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2023
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Bald Paul
I can confidently say that you'll expect to see $100 missing from your wallet.

Other than that, it's all opinion.
lol.. good one
Billydog is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 11:41 AM
  #32  
Tragically Ignorant
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 15,613

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Giant OCR A1; SOMA Double Cross Disc; 2022 Allez Elite mit der SRAM

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8186 Post(s)
Liked 9,099 Times in 5,054 Posts
Originally Posted by Billydog
lol.. good one

I like this guy, he can take a joke!

Just BTW, that $100/pair price is about normal for the GP5K in case you were wondering. I think I've been paying roughly that amount since they came out, except in 2020, when you couldn't find a reasonable pair of tires anywhere.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 11:49 AM
  #33  
LBKA (formerly punkncat)
 
Juan Foote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jawja
Posts: 4,299

Bikes: Spec Roubaix SL4, GT Traffic 1.0

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2208 Post(s)
Liked 960 Times in 686 Posts
The only thing I have found constantly irritating about them are the ones with the "natural rubber" sidewalls (I think there is actually a name for it, but escapes me at the moment). Within a fairly short time of use small strings begin to come out of the sidewall and get wrapped up in various things. I am fairly sure they now make a model with the black rubber sidewalls. Aside from this aspect Conti are a great tire and my preferred go to on my road bike.
Juan Foote is offline  
Likes For Juan Foote:
Old 05-25-23, 01:13 PM
  #34  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2333 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
You can expect very good wear from the non-tubeless GP5000 tires. The thickness is 2.8mm vs 2.3mm on the tubeless version. Since ca. 1mm of that is casing, the tubeless gives you about 2/3 the mileage as the tubed version. This back of the envelope calc squares with my real world experience. I used to routinely get 4,000 miles on the tubed version but cannot get 3,000 on the tubeless (I run only to the wear mark and get rid of them)

Just had to laugh at the QC comment as if someone is checking every tire against a spec. The problem with tight tires is a design issue around the last of standardization and who eats the cost of wear and tear on the molds but this should improve vastly with hookless carbon rims
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 02:11 PM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,744
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4560 Post(s)
Liked 5,083 Times in 3,137 Posts
Originally Posted by Juan Foote
The only thing I have found constantly irritating about them are the ones with the "natural rubber" sidewalls (I think there is actually a name for it, but escapes me at the moment). Within a fairly short time of use small strings begin to come out of the sidewall and get wrapped up in various things. I am fairly sure they now make a model with the black rubber sidewalls. Aside from this aspect Conti are a great tire and my preferred go to on my road bike.
Iíve noticed this happening with my tan wall GP5000S TR tyres too. Itís not caused any problems but seems very odd. I just trimmed off the loose ends.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 10:02 PM
  #36  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 7,246

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3546 Post(s)
Liked 3,698 Times in 1,854 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
The problem with tight tires is a design issue around the last of standardization and who eats the cost of wear and tear on the molds but this should improve vastly with hookless carbon rims
Can you explain this a bit more? Are they really designing molds to make tight tires so they can make the molds last longer before they go out of spec?
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat. ROUVY: terrymorse


terrymorse is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 10:14 PM
  #37  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,379

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2663 Post(s)
Liked 5,868 Times in 3,021 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
Iíve noticed this happening with my tan wall GP5000S TR tyres too. Itís not caused any problems but seems very odd. I just trimmed off the loose ends.
Just cleaned them out of my rear mech pulleys after disassembly.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Old 05-25-23, 10:20 PM
  #38  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,379

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2663 Post(s)
Liked 5,868 Times in 3,021 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
I say it's more technique. Way less that the rim actually has anything to do with how easy they go on.

Though if you are putting any tire on a skinny rim with a tube that's taking up the space the tire bead should be in while being installed, then yes the rim might be an issue over a wider rim with a deeper spoke channel. But still, with good technique and practice even the worst of rims are easy enough to overcome without using levers.
I say I beg to differ. I have owned several bikes with different rims and tires so I have decades of experience mounting and dismounting tires and on the Mavic rims I installed the tubed GP5000s yesterday, they were an absolute beast. I never use tire irons to mount tires, but with these it was impossible unless your thumbs have the strength of Hercules. I resorted to the irons and so far no pinching.

I have also installed tubed GPs on my Fondriest with other Mavic rims, and they were a breeze as well as the tubeless GP5000s on my newer bike. The rims do make a decided difference.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️








Last edited by rsbob; 05-25-23 at 10:23 PM.
rsbob is offline  
Likes For rsbob:
Old 05-26-23, 01:55 AM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,744
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4560 Post(s)
Liked 5,083 Times in 3,137 Posts
Originally Posted by rsbob
Just cleaned them out of my rear mech pulleys after disassembly.
I'm going to get the black ones next time and check my mech pulleys!
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 06:13 AM
  #40  
seŮor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,661

Bikes: '70s - '80s Campagnolo

Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3922 Post(s)
Liked 6,560 Times in 3,251 Posts
Won't buy the 25mm ever again. They measure only 23.5 and feel rock hard. They're fantastic on smooth pavement, but that's like 10 percent of the time around here.

👎👎
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 05-26-23, 06:43 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 780

Bikes: Lynskey R230, Trek 5200, 1975 Raleigh Pro, 1973 Falcon ,Trek T50 Tandem and a 1968 Paramount in progress.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 390 Post(s)
Liked 406 Times in 241 Posts
I have used lots of tires over the years but keep coming back to Conti 4000 or 5000 or whatever is current at the time. The 5000 series seem more true to marked size than previous versions.

Folks do complain about difficulty mounting, but I have found them easier than many, once you learn the technique. Year ago I ran Michelin tires and they were almost impossible to put on. Conti's are way better than that, and ride better too.

It's like car tires: the first two times out you will notice every little thing. Then....it's just a tire.
bblair is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 09:13 AM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
friday1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Posts: 663

Bikes: Optima Baron LR, '14 Nishiki Maricopa,'87 Trek 330 Elance, '89 Miyata 1400, '85 Peugeot PGN10, '04 Fuji Ace, '06 Giant Rincon, '95 Giant Allegre, '83 Trek 620, '86 Schwinn High Sierra

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Liked 164 Times in 108 Posts
Expect blisters on your thumbs when installing without levers, and to come up with new and innovative swear words.
friday1970 is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 11:09 AM
  #43  
52psi
 
Fahrenheit531's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,016

Bikes: Schwinn Volare ('78); Raleigh Competition GS ('79)

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 790 Post(s)
Liked 802 Times in 391 Posts
I run the 32mm on my single-speed and they're great. Hard to mount initially as others have said, but otherwise they pretty much rock.
(Of course they're no Rene Herse, but that's a whole nuther discussion.)
__________________
A race bike in any era is a highly personal choice that at its "best" balances the requirements of fit, weight, handling, durability and cost tempered by the willingness to toss it and oneself down the pavement at considerable speed. ~Bandera
Fahrenheit531 is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 01:19 PM
  #44  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,385

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 284 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,895 Times in 2,256 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa
Won't buy the 25mm ever again. They measure only 23.5 and feel rock hard. They're fantastic on smooth pavement, but that's like 10 percent of the time around here.

👎👎
Mine measure 24.8mm on Mavic Open Pro rims @90psi. Drop your tire pressure (10psi for me) and the compliance is better. I consider the Conti5000 to be the gatorskins of high end tires, which is good for people who desire that protection at the cost of suppleness. Won't be buying again. Veloflex and Vittoria are my fave, not enough miles to judge the Pirelli tires I recently purchased.
__________________
Vintage, modern, e-road. It is a big cycling universe.
Wildwood is offline  
Likes For Wildwood:
Old 05-26-23, 01:33 PM
  #45  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,385

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 284 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,895 Times in 2,256 Posts
Originally Posted by bblair
It's like car tires: the first two times out you will notice every little thing. Then....it's just a tire.
No, not in my experience.
But I do not ride road bicycles with suspension seatposts or stems or headsets or zertz inserts, etc - or gelatinous saddles.
__________________
Vintage, modern, e-road. It is a big cycling universe.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 01:50 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2333 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Can you explain this a bit more? Are they really designing molds to make tight tires so they can make the molds last longer before they go out of spec?

Hooked rim molds (carbon) wear out and the moulds themselves are made of different materials than hookeless. It is desirable to get the most wear as possible from a mold due to cost. Both the tire mfg and rim mfg have tolerances or ranges for their specifications. Thus, there is variation on fitment in the real world. With hookless moulds, the mandrel can be made from hard steel with better process capability resulting whereas hooked moulds have more pieces and to make the hook, part of the mould has to be flexible resulting in lower process capability irrespective of mould wear. Wider process variation (lower Cpk) makes tolerancing a challenge when trying to match an equally variable product (tires). So, what do you do? You go for safety (tightness). RH tires go on easily by hand but they also blow off. I have tried to mount Conti GP5000 on some rims and they could be mounted by hand whereas the same exact tire on another rim was an absolute nightmare. On my Firecrest 303 hookless, I do not need to use tools although they are tight, I can mount them.


In practice this means some know it all BF members could have a combination of tire/rim that is indeed not too hard to mount and another BF member could have the same rim and tire with both towards the end of spec and that is enough to make them a bear to mount.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 05-26-23, 02:04 PM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2333 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
The other thing to realize WRT Conti, is the GP5000 (tubed), GP5000 TL and GP5000 S TR are all quite different in terms of bead dimensions and strength. Apples to Oranges when it comes to mounting challenges. The GP5000 TL was "not approved" for use on Enve wheels but the GP5K S TR is Enve approved, for instance
GhostRider62 is offline  
Likes For GhostRider62:
Old 05-26-23, 02:14 PM
  #48  
Expired Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 11,800
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3770 Post(s)
Liked 5,721 Times in 2,888 Posts
It's always interesting to read about manufacturing processes. I've read that hookless rims are cheaper to manufacture but I haven't seen the info about hooked rim molds wearing out and causing dimensional variations. Link please?
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 05-27-23, 07:59 PM
  #49  
Newbie
 
socalife's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2023
Location: Southern CA
Posts: 16

Bikes: Colnago ACR, Viner record corse, Benotto 3000, Torelli super strada

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 9 Posts
I run 25mm and 23mm GP 5000s on my new bike and vintage bike, respectively. The new bike uses Fulcrum Racing 3 (17mm inside) wheels and the 5000s mount easier than Gatorskins. On the vintage rims these are easier to mount than Gatorskins too.
One way the rolling resistance is reduced on the 5000s and the ride smoother is the softer more flexible rubber. Unfortunately broken glass can stick a little better and it comes around and hits the brake bridge or fork crown and makes cuts deeper than usual. If you ride clean roads they last long but I have never been able to experience this due to all the mini liquor bottles discarded in the bike lanes here in San Diego. The ride so much nicer I take the risk. I got flats with gatorskins too.
socalife is offline  
Old 05-28-23, 11:51 PM
  #50  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,379

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2663 Post(s)
Liked 5,868 Times in 3,021 Posts
Tubeless tire shot or still rideable? 3 years old with good tread.

__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.