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Tennis Elbow

Old 09-04-23, 12:43 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
You're using the gel, presumably?
Yes, the gel.
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Old 09-04-23, 12:55 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Jklotz
Yes, the gel.
The gel is good stuff. It's effective, it has very few side effects, and it doesn't all end up in your kidneys like ibuprofen.
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Old 09-05-23, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
I think the other readers of this thread understood what was meant by "in the same joint."
Let's not confuse them by saying ""In the same joint" means left elbow, right elbow, left knee, etc." Certainly not correct.
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Old 09-05-23, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Jicafold
Let's not confuse them by saying ""In the same joint" means left elbow, right elbow, left knee, etc." Certainly not correct.
You really need to let this go. I don't think anyone was confused by such a simple statement other than you.

FYI, the NHS uses the same phraseology:

You may be able to have a hydrocortisone injection into the same joint up to 4 times in a year. The number of injections you need depends on the area being treated and how strong the dose is.
as does the Mayo Clinic:
Cortisone shots are injections that can help relieve pain and inflammation in a specific area of your body. They're most commonly injected into joints such as your ankle, elbow, hip, knee, shoulder, spine or wrist.
https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/hydroco...ist%20or%20hip.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-pro...t/pac-20384794
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Old 09-05-23, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
FYI, the NHS uses the same phraseology: as does the Mayo Clinic:
It's unclear why you keep bringing this up. It does not matter how many shots the Mayo Clinic or other studies support for intra-articular injections. Besides I've already read those and they clearly define what a "joint" is unlike yourself. The OP's problem is not in the joint. I don't know why that is so difficult to understand. Accordingly, the information you provide, which is well known in the orthopedic community, is irrelevant. We are not talking about the joint. By the way, that applies to intra-articular injections due to concerns regarding chondrotoxicity of the anesthetic used. Not steroid. I have provided patients with thousands of steroid injections both into and outside a joint (ligament, tendon, etc.) in the orthopedic clinic not to mention instructing other physician assistant students and orthopedic surgery residents proper technique. I'm way ahead of you. You need to let this "into the joint" obsession go away. It's misleading and irrelevant to the readers. If you have any further concerns just send me a private message instead of on here. It's a disservice to others.
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Old 09-05-23, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Jicafold
It's unclear why you keep bringing this up. It does not matter how many shots the Mayo Clinic or other studies support for intra-articular injections. Besides I've already read those and they clearly define what a "joint" is unlike yourself. The OP's problem is not in the joint. I don't know why that is so difficult to understand. Accordingly, the information you provide, which is well known in the orthopedic community, is irrelevant. We are not talking about the joint. By the way, that applies due to concerns regarding chondrotoxicity of the anesthetic used. Not steroid. I have provided patients with thousands of steroid injections both into and outside a joint (ligament, tendon, etc.) in the orthopedic clinic not to mention instructing other physician assistant students and orthopedic surgery residents proper technique. I'm way ahead of you. You need to let this "into the joint" obsession go away. It's misleading and irrelevant to the readers. If you have any further concerns just send me a private message instead of on here. It's a disservice to others.
Let it go ...
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Old 09-05-23, 09:25 AM
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A few weeks of eccentric exercise with this device fixed my lateral epicondylitis permanently.
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Old 09-05-23, 10:55 AM
  #33  
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OK, I'll ask it... are your brakes making you work too hard? Mine take very little effort, like as in "one finger effort." While I'm maybe only 8 hours a week on the bike, max, it doesn't seem that I would get enough "volume of work" to generate such an adverse response. Not challenging the diagnosis, but could the machine side be improved to reduce the exposure?
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Old 09-05-23, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by blacknbluebikes
OK, I'll ask it... are your brakes making you work too hard? Mine take very little effort, like as in "one finger effort." While I'm maybe only 8 hours a week on the bike, max, it doesn't seem that I would get enough "volume of work" to generate such an adverse response. Not challenging the diagnosis, but could the machine side be improved to reduce the exposure?
No. I've got newish 105 disc brakes. They work quite well. Lifting weights in the gym is what caused it, well, that and getting a little older I suppose. It's just the motion of braking that seems to aggravate it.
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Old 09-05-23, 02:33 PM
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I had severe tennis elbow from work place injury. I went through all the various treatments that have been mentioned above & ones that are no longer available like Vioxx but once you stop those & go back doing same RSI that it gets to point that the last resort is surgery. PT was great but once I went back to work, it would re-aggravate the injury & become a vicious cycle. The company doctor informed me that if the pain persisted & became chronic, then the last resort would be surgery. He described it as they would make a small incision & scrape the area around the bone where the pain is to help it heal.

However at the time, this was like 17 yrs ago, he said there was a study taking place that was looking into using sound waves to treat injuries & the results looked promising. The pros were that it was non-invasive, very short down time vs surgery & less complications. Needless to say I jumped at it. My company paid for the treatment & it was like 12 visits of 30 minutes. Shock wave therapy is pretty common now but it totally healed my tennis elbow & I've never had another issue with it since. I was basically healed after the 12th visit & was able to go straight back to work with no problems. In order for the therapy to work, it has to be at a high setting to work but it is very painful...feels like its burning. Once the machine is turned off, the burning sensation stopped the pain seemed to diminish a bit after each visit. The treatment is costly but if factor the costs of all the other treatments & PT or worse case scenario which is surgery & all the risks plus down time associated with it...for me I only wish I had done it sooner.
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Old 09-07-23, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by stan01
I However at the time, this was like 17 yrs ago, he said there was a study taking place that was looking into using sound waves to treat injuries & the results looked promising.
Maybe you got lucky. This is not a proven therapy. Study results are inconclusive. "High energy ESWT is not supported, but low energy ESWT might show better outcomes without the need for anesthesia, but it is still not recommended. Trials in this area have yielded conflicting results. The value if any of ESWT for lateral elbow pain, has been neither confirmed nor entirely excluded. When other treatments have failed, some providers believe that shock wave therapy may help some patients with tennis elbow. But studies have not verified this, so ESWT cannot be recommended now for epicondylitis, although it has few side effects." "One double-blind study concluded that low-dose shock wave therapy without anesthetic is a safe and effective treatment for chronic lateral epicondylitis. (18) (EG 1) Another high-quality clinical trial concluded that high energy ESWT with anesthesia was ineffective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. (19) (EG 1) Outcomes might be better in chronic cases (> 12 months) treated with low energy ESWT. (20) (EG 1) No firm conclusions can be drawn concerning the effect of ESWT on tendinitis of the elbow from the conflicting data reported. It is not known whether the different results are due to methodological bias or differences in the population and intervention. (21)"

Regardless, it is doubtful insurance would pay for this. Particlarly without a prior trial of NSAIDs, physical therapy, and a steroid shot firtst.
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Old 09-15-23, 10:03 PM
  #37  
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I feel your pain.It took me months to get rid of the ache but would get minor flair ups till it finally subsided.Youll need patience
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