Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

does 3x require more shifting than 2x?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

does 3x require more shifting than 2x?

Old 09-22-23, 09:31 AM
  #76  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,136
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7527 Post(s)
Liked 7,916 Times in 3,982 Posts
[QUOTE=t2p;23022705][QUOTE=terrymorse;23021935]
Originally Posted by big john
On my triple road bike, 52-39-30, I can do a lot of rides without ever using the small ring./

opposite for me - very little / almost no climbing in the big ring

not too many climbs I could / can take with a 53 or 52 chainring ... or even current 50 or 46 ...

can use big ring on small or short climbs (rolling) - but thatís about it ... just about everything else small ring ...
I was referring to the triple and not using the 30 ring on most climbs, meaning climbing on the 39 like a standard double. I wouldn't climb on the 52.

In the 80s and early 90s most of us had doubles with 52-42 rings. On my 7 speed stuff I put a 28 cog on the back. You could buy individual cogs and put what you wanted. So I climbed everything in 42x28 low and I was 220#. Still can't believe I did that. I was always the slowest climber in my groups and had the lowest gear.
big john is online now  
Likes For big john:
Old 09-22-23, 09:33 AM
  #77  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,136
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7527 Post(s)
Liked 7,916 Times in 3,982 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat
And a lot of the initial responses aren't even answering the OP's question. Which one requires more shifting?
There is only one answer; Depends.
big john is online now  
Likes For big john:
Old 09-22-23, 09:56 AM
  #78  
Super-duper Genius
 
Broctoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Muskrat Springs, Utah
Posts: 1,711
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
Liked 977 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta
Who would have thought that a thread concerning 3x would quickly veer off topic and devolve into the same old arguments we have read 1000 times?
BikeForums is sometimes an open powder keg. The OP here unwittingly drives by and...

Broctoon is offline  
Likes For Broctoon:
Old 09-22-23, 10:26 AM
  #79  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,285

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2704 Post(s)
Liked 2,719 Times in 1,374 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
In the 80s and early 90s most of us had doubles with 52-42 rings. On my 7 speed stuff I put a 28 cog on the back. You could buy individual cogs and put what you wanted. So I climbed everything in 42x28 low and I was 220#. Still can't believe I did that. I was always the slowest climber in my groups and had the lowest gear.
Thinking back to the olden times and the gears we had, it's amazing how we climbed anything at all. But we managed.

I built up a full Campy Record bike in 1974, and I think my lowest gear was 44x23. On climbs, my butt rarely saw the saddle. And cadence? Never heard of it.

This was the form to emulate:


__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 09-22-23, 10:33 AM
  #80  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,380

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3550 Post(s)
Liked 6,456 Times in 2,609 Posts
Originally Posted by Broctoon
BikeForums is sometimes an open powder keg. The OP here unwittingly drives by and...
It's not so much a powder keg, as it is the Cuyahoga River.
tomato coupe is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 10:59 AM
  #81  
Super-duper Genius
 
Broctoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Muskrat Springs, Utah
Posts: 1,711
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
Liked 977 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by tomato coupe
It's not so much a powder keg, as it is the Cuyahoga River.
How could it possibly catch fire? It's a river! (OP innocently flicks his cigarette in...)
Broctoon is offline  
Likes For Broctoon:
Old 09-22-23, 11:08 AM
  #82  
Senior Member
 
Dave Mayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,383
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1155 Post(s)
Liked 411 Times in 242 Posts
For road use, 3 x systems make shifting dead simple, and you shift far less often.

90% of the time you're on the middle ring. Descending or a tailwind, then the big ring. On long climbs, the granny gear. I shift far less on a triple than a compact double, where you are frequently cycling back and forth between the big and little rings trying to find the right gear and not cross-chain.

Are triple systems low quality? Nope, not when running Campagnolo Record 3 x 10, which is amazing gear. Smooth, precise and reliable. And apparently perpetually serviceable. Or my Ultegra 3 x 10 systems. Not bad either, except the shifters eat cables.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Likes For Dave Mayer:
Old 09-22-23, 11:47 AM
  #83  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 6,962
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3559 Post(s)
Liked 3,838 Times in 2,430 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat
And a lot of the initial responses aren't even answering the OP's question. Which one requires more shifting?
The initial question is a bit odd really. The main reason for having a 3x is to get the widest possible gear range, with the smallest gaps between gears. So does that not imply that you will be shifting gears more often?

People keep talking about constantly having to flip between the big and small chainring on a 2x, but I doubt those people are using a modern 2x12 or if they are then they are not making full use of the cassette.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 09-22-23, 11:48 AM
  #84  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,285

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2704 Post(s)
Liked 2,719 Times in 1,374 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer
90% of the time you're on the middle ring. Descending or a tailwind, then the big ring. On long climbs, the granny gear. I shift far less on a triple than a compact double, where you are frequently cycling back and forth between the big and little rings trying to find the right gear and not cross-chain.
Your experience is not everyone's experience.

When I had a triple on a road bike, I spent much of the time on the big ring, climbed almost always on the middle ring, and almost never used the small ring.

Once I switched to a compact double (and never looked back), I spend even more time on the big ring, and I shift the front less.

Edit: Shifting down the triple front big-to-middle was going from 52 to 42, a gear reduction of only 19%. Shifting down the compact double big-to-small was going from 50 to 34, a 32% gear reduction. That was a significant difference -- more "bang for the shift".
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat


Last edited by terrymorse; 09-22-23 at 02:47 PM.
terrymorse is offline  
Likes For terrymorse:
Old 09-22-23, 12:15 PM
  #85  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,380

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3550 Post(s)
Liked 6,456 Times in 2,609 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Your experience is not everyone's experience.
There are some people that will never understand that other people don't ride the same way that they do.
tomato coupe is offline  
Likes For tomato coupe:
Old 09-22-23, 12:19 PM
  #86  
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 15,158

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7452 Post(s)
Liked 3,138 Times in 1,677 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat
And a lot of the initial responses aren't even answering the OP's question. Which one requires more shifting?
That was actually answered very early on ... It Depends. What gearing are we discussing? What terrain? What is the desire and abilityof the rider?

There is no single answer, beyond, "It depends."

In general, the number of available gears does not dictate the number of shifts. The terrain, the amount of effort the rider wishes to exert, determine when the rider shifts. If the rider shifts when s/he finds a particular ratio to high or low for a given situation, then the rider shifts ... whether the bike has one, two, or three chain rings.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 12:44 PM
  #87  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 6,962
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3559 Post(s)
Liked 3,838 Times in 2,430 Posts
So here is some actual data from my road bike on 2x12 SRAM AXS (48/35 with 10-33 cassette)

Flat Century Fondo:-
Front shifts: 4
Rear shifts: 842

Hilly Century Fondo:-
Front shifts: 54
Rear shifts: 940

Mountain Century Fondo:-
Front shifts: 36
Rear shifts: 332

So relatively few front shifts and virtually none on a flat ride.

It would be interesting to see similar data for a 3x but I suspect nobody will have an electronic 3x to produce any.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 09-22-23, 01:08 PM
  #88  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,423
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1041 Post(s)
Liked 1,078 Times in 553 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs
I am not here to dispute simple facts ... but the meanings and reasons behind those facts.


You said that anyone riding a 3x MTB really wants a 1x .... I said, "Not I."


The manufacturers offer what they think will make them the most profit. They are not interested in tailoring bikes to riders, they are interested in moving units .... riders need to tailor their riding to the equipment offered. Just as with the move away from triples .... Ride doubles and like it or don't but most of what we sell will be doubles because we are in the selling business, not the satisfying business. Buy our stuff, and be satisfied. We sell are stuff and are satisfied. What's wrong with you.


The original Model T Ford was available only in black, Did this somehow "prove" that black cars were better? No, it proved that for the sake of efficiency In The Factory, in the interest of cost containment to maximize Profit (not customer satisfaction) certain decisions were made.


1x is the new off-road thing. ... for the factories. Since I am not a factory, I am not interested is pleasing the factories.


Notice I never said that 1x was not better For You. I am not saying 2X is not better for a lot of riders in a lot of situations. I am saying I have doubles and triples, and each serves a different purpose, and serves it well.


As was noted above,. the vast majority of bikes sold in the USA are not only 1x, they are single-speed. This does not "prove" that single-speed is better .... right? or are you rushing to the garage to convert all your bikes from disc to coaster brake?


My main point here: We are two distinct individuals with two distinct sets of needs and desires. please do not make the error of assuming that what is best for you is best for everyone. (LOL ..... can you picture me calling you "Fascist"?) But seriously .... After more than 50 years of riding on the road and off, I have pretty much figured out how this bicycle stuff works. it is not the science of the rocket. I know when a triple suits my needs better by Experience, not theory. And I trust you, however long you have been riding, have also figured out how to do bicycles, and know how to meet your own needs. Just don't confound the two of us. We are different.
This explains the dogmatic refusal to accept that things have progressed to the point that 3x systems are a vestige of the past. Yes, they are still being manufactured and sold, but only for entry-level and replacement markets. Demographically speaking the market for quality 3x systems is aging out of the sport further diminishing demand.
Atlas Shrugged is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 01:15 PM
  #89  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,136
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7527 Post(s)
Liked 7,916 Times in 3,982 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Your experience is not everyone's experience.

When I had a triple on a road bike, I spent much of the time on the big ring, climbed almost always on the middle ring, and almost never used the small ring.

Once I switched to a compact double (and never looked back), I spend even more time on the big ring, and I shift the front less.
Same, but I still have the triple bike as a back-up. I'm happy on either bike, actually, but if I buy another bike it will be a compact double.
big john is online now  
Likes For big john:
Old 09-22-23, 01:17 PM
  #90  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 16,140

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9257 Post(s)
Liked 10,388 Times in 5,286 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz
Shift happens.
When it just happens, it's usually because I need to tighten the friction shifter.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Likes For genejockey:
Old 09-22-23, 01:19 PM
  #91  
Advanced Slacker
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 6,096

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter, Surly Wednesday, Canfielld Tilt

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2704 Post(s)
Liked 2,459 Times in 1,389 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
The initial question is a bit odd really. The main reason for having a 3x is to get the widest possible gear range, with the smallest gaps between gears. So does that not imply that you will be shifting gears more often?

People keep talking about constantly having to flip between the big and small chainring on a 2x, but I doubt those people are using a modern 2x12 or if they are then they are not making full use of the cassette.
It is not an odd question at all, as evidenced by the fact that people are giving different answers based on their experience.

I shifted the front on my 3x9 triple less often than my 2x11 double.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 01:22 PM
  #92  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,380

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3550 Post(s)
Liked 6,456 Times in 2,609 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta
It is not an odd question at all, as evidenced by the fact that people are giving different answers based on their experience.
I think that's exactly why it's an odd question -- there is no correct answer without specifying numerous conditions.
tomato coupe is offline  
Likes For tomato coupe:
Old 09-22-23, 01:24 PM
  #93  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,451
Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3012 Post(s)
Liked 2,307 Times in 1,387 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
The initial question is a bit odd really. The main reason for having a 3x is to get the widest possible gear range, with the smallest gaps between gears. So does that not imply that you will be shifting gears more often?

People keep talking about constantly having to flip between the big and small chainring on a 2x, but I doubt those people are using a modern 2x12 or if they are then they are not making full use of the cassette.
I actually ride 3X to reduce my overall shifting. Not as much of an issue if you're not using shimano STIs with the dreaded long throw of the brake lever shift, or electronic. Still have to hold/push that button. But to answer your question, no. I'd much rather shift the FD once or twice and the RD 2-3 times than shift the FD once and the RD 7+ only to have to do it again in reverse down the road 500 yards. Not much of an issue if the terrain stays constant for a while. But if it's varying constantly like a roller coaster, I'll even take friction.

Last edited by seypat; 09-22-23 at 01:27 PM.
seypat is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 01:42 PM
  #94  
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 15,158

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7452 Post(s)
Liked 3,138 Times in 1,677 Posts
My question regarding this question would be .... What the F is wrong with shifting?

I can tell you, and I have seen other say the same ... that once they went to brifters from downtube friction shifting, they shifted a Lot more often and spent a lot Less time riding at a compromised cadence or pressure because shifting was so much more convenient.

Same with electronic , ... shift 50 times a minute if you like, to Always be in exactly the right ratio ... it is literally as easy as pushing a button.

if you want to shift less ... simply shift less.

I think the ease and accuracy of modern gear-change systems is a pure joy, and being able to shift so easily is a great feature .... I got indexed brifters (or indexed triggers on my MTB) because I Like to shift whenever the situation calls for it, and I like those shifts to be quick and precise.

If shifting is a bad thing ... join the ranks of the S/S riders. Apparently they are the most numerous by far, and they cannot be wrong if they are the majority, right?

To me the issue is never "How much am I shifting?" but "Do I have the right ratio, and how well do I know my gearbox so that I can always find the right ratio?"

Some people seem to be complaining that with a 2x sometimes you have to shift both ends. To me., that is just part of the system. I start out from a stop on a particular corner which leads to a short hill, in about the second or third lowest cog on the small ring. As i clear the corner and get onto the lower portion of the climb, I shift up in front. If I find that I am having a good day, I might do the hill in the big ring. if it is not a great day, I might shift back to the small ring. I shift up a couple in back and down in front and I am in a slightly lower ratio, but less of a jump than one down in back on the large ring. Three up and one down I am in a slightly higher ratio, but less high than one shift up on the large ring. That is what transmission is for ... finding the right ratio for the situation, to get maximum efficiency from the system.

When I rode MTB a lot (3x ... I know, I am ignorant of the amazing awesomeness of fewer options ... ) I had a ridiculously complete knowledge of all my crossover points so I could always find the right gear. I was always trying to plan ahead so I didn't have to try to shift up front under load, while still being able to maximize speed once I cleared the obstacle .... it was part of the fun of the ride.

Maybe because I had the ability to turn pretty high revs but not huge power, it was easier for me to use my gears and lungs instead of my muscles. I know that with fewer gears one must more often use muscle power to turn a too-large gear because there simply aren't any intermediate ratios ... but if a person has sufficient power to do so ... then the simpler system works just as well. We each need to optimize or tools for our abilities.

Of course, now I have neither legs nor lungs, and my heart has crapped out, so all of that is moot ...

Last edited by Maelochs; 09-22-23 at 01:47 PM.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 09-22-23, 02:09 PM
  #95  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,451
Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3012 Post(s)
Liked 2,307 Times in 1,387 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs
My question regarding this question would be .... What the F is wrong with shifting?

I can tell you, and I have seen other say the same ... that once they went to brifters from downtube friction shifting, they shifted a Lot more often and spent a lot Less time riding at a compromised cadence or pressure because shifting was so much more convenient.

Same with electronic , ... shift 50 times a minute if you like, to Always be in exactly the right ratio ... it is literally as easy as pushing a button.

if you want to shift less ... simply shift less.

I think the ease and accuracy of modern gear-change systems is a pure joy, and being able to shift so easily is a great feature .... I got indexed brifters (or indexed triggers on my MTB) because I Like to shift whenever the situation calls for it, and I like those shifts to be quick and precise.

If shifting is a bad thing ... join the ranks of the S/S riders. Apparently they are the most numerous by far, and they cannot be wrong if they are the majority, right?

To me the issue is never "How much am I shifting?" but "Do I have the right ratio, and how well do I know my gearbox so that I can always find the right ratio?"

Some people seem to be complaining that with a 2x sometimes you have to shift both ends. To me., that is just part of the system. I start out from a stop on a particular corner which leads to a short hill, in about the second or third lowest cog on the small ring. As i clear the corner and get onto the lower portion of the climb, I shift up in front. If I find that I am having a good day, I might do the hill in the big ring. if it is not a great day, I might shift back to the small ring. I shift up a couple in back and down in front and I am in a slightly lower ratio, but less of a jump than one down in back on the large ring. Three up and one down I am in a slightly higher ratio, but less high than one shift up on the large ring. That is what transmission is for ... finding the right ratio for the situation, to get maximum efficiency from the system.

When I rode MTB a lot (3x ... I know, I am ignorant of the amazing awesomeness of fewer options ... ) I had a ridiculously complete knowledge of all my crossover points so I could always find the right gear. I was always trying to plan ahead so I didn't have to try to shift up front under load, while still being able to maximize speed once I cleared the obstacle .... it was part of the fun of the ride.

Maybe because I had the ability to turn pretty high revs but not huge power, it was easier for me to use my gears and lungs instead of my muscles. I know that with fewer gears one must more often use muscle power to turn a too-large gear because there simply aren't any intermediate ratios ... but if a person has sufficient power to do so ... then the simpler system works just as well. We each need to optimize or tools for our abilities.

Of course, now I have neither legs nor lungs, and my heart has crapped out, so all of that is moot ...
For my particular situation, I was dealing with the Shimano STIs. The brake lever shift feels very similar(to me) to a wrist curl with a small dumbell and works the muscles the same way. On an all day ride, my right forearm muscles would get so beefy/tight to the point that I could no longer squeeze the brake lever. It would become a safety issue. Basically the equilivant of doing a wrist curl with every shift of the brake lever. Enter Microshift(or SRAM) and that issue has almost solved itself. Bear in mind that I'm a fast twitcher. The only reason I'm riding bikes/doing endurance sports is because I can't do the other sports anymore. I don't even like 1T jumps. Much prefer 2T jumps. The quickest way for me to cramps is droning along at the same cadence mile after mile. I still need the gears and have to shift them, so any time I can shift 4 or 5 times instead of double that, I'll take it. It helps. If I had to ride a fixed gear bike only, doubful I could go longer than 50 miles no matter how much I trained. I don't have the physiology for it. A single speed would extend that range simply because I could coast.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 09-22-23, 02:17 PM
  #96  
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 15,158

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7452 Post(s)
Liked 3,138 Times in 1,677 Posts
^ An excellent example of a rider learning what works For That Rider, and using it to optimize the riding experience.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 09-22-23, 02:19 PM
  #97  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,136
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7527 Post(s)
Liked 7,916 Times in 3,982 Posts
Originally Posted by genejockey
When it just happens, it's usually because I need to tighten the friction shifter.
I remember that little bail. When I had bar end friction shifters I never had to mess with them.
big john is online now  
Old 09-22-23, 02:23 PM
  #98  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 16,140

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9257 Post(s)
Liked 10,388 Times in 5,286 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
I remember that little bail. When I had bar end friction shifters I never had to mess with them.
I generally don't, but once or twice I've had a bike try to shift out of the low gear when standing up on a climb, which would be bad.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Old 09-22-23, 02:35 PM
  #99  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,136
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7527 Post(s)
Liked 7,916 Times in 3,982 Posts
Originally Posted by genejockey
I generally don't, but once or twice I've had a bike try to shift out of the low gear when standing up on a climb, which would be bad.
The old DT shifters had the bail to tighten the preload. The bar ends had a screwdriver slot. I did have the DT come loose. Oh, just remembered a bike with friction shifters mounted on the stem. They had a little plastic wing nut type thing.
big john is online now  
Old 09-22-23, 02:43 PM
  #100  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,380

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3550 Post(s)
Liked 6,456 Times in 2,609 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs
Some people seem to be complaining that with a 2x sometimes you have to shift both ends ...
... and pretending it doesn't happen with a 3x.
tomato coupe is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.