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ESI extra chunky grips less shock/vibration absorbing than expected

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ESI extra chunky grips less shock/vibration absorbing than expected

Old 10-07-23, 06:06 PM
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ESI extra chunky grips less shock/vibration absorbing than expected

Anyone else find the same? Could fit ond of those thicker and softer ESI grips but then they will interfere with shifter levers. Extra chunky barely clears them.
Couldn't find any bad reviews in terms of shock/vibration absorption, so decided to give it a go.
Hands still get tired pretty fast on a recently upgraded 50į back sweep handlebars with them. Seems like only shoulders doesn't hurt anymore compared to flat bars, but palms still get as much painful as with ergo style grips.
Probably will keep the 40c front tyre inflated to 2 bars instead of 2.5 bars, but that might lead to snake bites since the whole system weight is 120-130 kg.

Last edited by sysrq; 10-08-23 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 10-07-23, 06:21 PM
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I like the ESI grips I use them for the "bar ends" of my Koga Denham and Velo Orange Crazy Bars. For the actual swept back. bars I use Ergon GC1s and Ergons would be the only grips I use for just about anything aside from those "bar ends".

For me 50˚ bars are way too swept back for me and caused hand pain right away. Generally for me 35˚ is the max I want to go and if no GC1s no thank you!

I have a feeling maybe your bars are a bit too swept back especially all at once. I would start with something a little less and try that first.
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Old 10-07-23, 08:22 PM
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How about a picture?

How are the bars angled relative to the horizontal plane?

How do you place your hands on them? Which part or parts of the hand are bearing the upward reaction force of the top of the bar?

What is the relative height of the saddle and bar where you grip?

How much weight is borne on your hands and how much is on the saddle or shifted to the pedals by your pedal work?

Otto
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Old 10-08-23, 05:39 AM
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I would try some gel gloves. I always use mine regardless of what kind of grips.

Schwalbe Big Apple (or Big Ben) is the ultimate 2 bar tyre.
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Old 10-08-23, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
Anyone else find the same? Could fit ond of those thicker and softer ESI grips but then they will interfere with shifter levers. Extra chunky barely clears them.
On my mtb I run Esi extra chunky, for pavement flat bar bikes I like the ergon gp grips. I actually liked them on the mtb too for comfort. I just felt like I didn't have as much freedom to throw the bike around on single track with the Ergon GP style grips on the mtb.
On the same note, ive been riding super chunky rough stuff. Over time my wrist have hurt way less, but I definitely don't use my bars as a shelf support anymore!
Sometimes core strength, wrist strength, abdominal muscle strength, lower back strength, will be far superior than any crutch you can use as a grip. Thats for wrist pain. As for vibration dampening, most of it is in tires and tire pressure, tires are not equal! some seem to quite chatter, others amplify the chatter.
Then there are some bike frames (or forks) that tires and grips, and physical strength can't fix! They just suck....
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Old 10-08-23, 07:57 AM
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You might want to check out post #7 in this thread:

Numb Hands

It describes how to optimally place your hands to put the weight on parts of the hands that can bear it best. It is focused on drop bars. I have used this as a guide in adjusting how I ride my swept back bars.

There are several illustrations showing the part of the palm that should bear weight and diagrams showing all the nerves in the center of the palm, which is the area that must not bear weight.

I have ridden many, many thousands of miles on 74 degree sweep classic touring bars (much of it single speed) with virtually no hand discomfort throughout that time. Iíve used ordinary Oury grips and either foam tape or cheap bar foam for the more forward sections of the bar.

For a 74 degree sweep, I find tilting the ends down about 10-11 degrees strikes a nice comfort compromise between the seated and standing riding positions. It may be different for 50 degree sweep so you will need to experiment.

With 74 degree sweep, it is also possible to use the grips with the thumb aligned on top of the bar and bearing weight on the pad of the thumb. That area can also bear weight, but avoid using a grip that places weight between thumb and forefinger. Many nerves there.

Actually, I think when I put thumbs aligned on the bars the weight is still mainly on the outer palm region. That just avoids any chance of putting weight between thumb and forefinger.

Otto

Last edited by ofajen; 10-08-23 at 08:16 AM.
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Old 10-08-23, 09:04 AM
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I have heard that excessively soft grips cause "pump," that is, your hands continually, tire loosen and re-tighten as you unconsciously seek a firm grip but cannot ever fully achieve it because of the padding. I assume that you will try some of the other excellent advice offered hear .... also consider hand exercises if there is some specific and personal situation where your hands just need a boost.

Hope you enjoy your rides and your life more each time.
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Old 10-08-23, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
Anyone else find the same? Could fit ond of those thicker and softer ESI grips but then they will interfere with shifter levers. Extra chunky barely clears them.
Couldn't find any bad reviews in terms of shock/vibration absorption, so decided to give it a go.
Hands still get tired pretty fast on a recently upgraded 50į back sweep handlebars with them. Seems like only shoulders doesn't hurt anymore compared to flat bars, but palms still get as much painful as with ergo style grips.
Probably will keep the 40c front tyre inflated to 2 bars instead of 2.5 bars, but that might lead to snake bites since the whole system weight is 120-130 kg.
Originally Posted by ofajen
How about a picture?

How are the bars angled relative to the horizontal plane?

How do you place your hands on them? Which part or parts of the hand are bearing the upward reaction force of the top of the bar?

What is the relative height of the saddle and bar where you grip?

How much weight is borne on your hands and how much is on the saddle or shifted to the pedals by your pedal work?

Otto
Might need to find some suspension forks since some are using them on a frame not designed for front suspension. Decided to use rigid forks just in case I need to use front panniers for possible longer tours.
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Old 10-08-23, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Metieval
On my mtb I run Esi extra chunky, for pavement flat bar bikes I like the ergon gp grips. I actually liked them on the mtb too for comfort. I just felt like I didn't have as much freedom to throw the bike around on single track with the Ergon GP style grips on the mtb.
On the same note, ive been riding super chunky rough stuff. Over time my wrist have hurt way less, but I definitely don't use my bars as a shelf support anymore!
Sometimes core strength, wrist strength, abdominal muscle strength, lower back strength, will be far superior than any crutch you can use as a grip. Thats for wrist pain. As for vibration dampening, most of it is in tires and tire pressure, tires are not equal! some seem to quite chatter, others amplify the chatter.
Then there are some bike frames (or forks) that tires and grips, and physical strength can't fix! They just suck....
Previously used Schwalbe Supreme 37c, now using Continental Contact Urban with supposedly slightly lower rolling resistance and slightly better wet grip. Foldable Supremes seem to be thinner than Contact Urban so that might explain the difference in vibration damping. Wired Contact Urban seem to have softer thicker type of rubber.
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Old 10-08-23, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
Previously used Schwalbe Supreme 37c, now using Continental Contact Urban with supposedly slightly lower rolling resistance and slightly better wet grip. Foldable Supremes seem to be thinner than Contact Urban so that might explain the difference in vibration damping. Wired Contact Urban seem to have softer thicker type of rubber.
I had a drop bar bike that chattered hard. I put 38c protite paselas on it, and it took the edge off. I then put those tires on a steel framed 1991 Schwinn crosscut with the GPS or GPS grips on it and it was like riding on glass.

Play with your air pressure, the window is much larger than most people think. the High pressure is better myth was a huge mental hurdle for me to get over. We don't ride on a velodrome, we ride in the real world. If you go to low you risk pinch flat, if your tubed, burping if you're tubless. Too low can feel draggy on pavement. Just play with it, and you might be surprised arms the difference it makes.

I have found in my experience that removing the chatter, = faster ride.
Of course in the middle of that is the perceived feel while riding. Which isn't always an accurate representation. I don't care how slow I am as long as I feel fast though. Haha 😄
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Old 10-11-23, 08:45 AM
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Problem isn't the grip, it's the hbar, that angle will never be comfortable in anything but silky smooth roads, and even then probably not.
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Old 10-11-23, 09:04 AM
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Padding won't do anything if you ride with bent wrists. And it won't give you much more time if any on the bike for bad hand placement that puts you resting on the back half of your palms.
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Old 10-11-23, 11:25 AM
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I never even think of changing grips on my flat-bar bikes (I might someday try those oversized Ergons,but .... meh.) As @wheelreason and @Iride01, note, comfort on a flat-bar (swept-bar, H-bar, or Jones bar, or Trekker bar, or for that matter drop-bar) is all about hand placement and weight placement. Arm angles, wrist angles, weight distribution, hand placement on the bar ..... I don't care what the next guy does, i will saw off my bar, get a longer or shorter stem, a straighter or more swept bar, and I will play close attention to my physical positioning and weight placement. I have ridden some pretty long rides on flat bars with no hand discomfort, and I have had numbness within half-an-hour. After making sure the bike, including the bar, fit me, .... I was and have been able to do long rides on flat bars.
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Old 10-16-23, 12:08 PM
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The wolf tooth silicone grips are better since their material is slightly firmer. I find the ESI Extra Chunky (and all their foam grips) pack down under pressure too easily.
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Old 10-18-23, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Chandne
The wolf tooth silicone grips are better since their material is slightly firmer. I find the ESI Extra Chunky (and all their foam grips) pack down under pressure too easily.
I have go try them then, but I do love my ESI
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Old 11-20-23, 05:49 AM
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Finally found vintage style finger pattern grips on amazon, but now they are made with comb like texture on the other side which might become uncomfortable after a while.
Seems like smooth and glossy texture might reduce skin soreness according to experience with the original finger pattern grips.
Decided to go for barrel shaped grips since motorcycle riders consider those comfortable.
There are also Thorn anatomically shaped cork barrel grips and some other cork grips but texture of those might be too rought compared to glossy rubber, since even ESI grips feel too abrasive.

I think the right shape is more important since it encourages you to not hold the the grips too tight.

The only barrel shaped grips I found on Amazon where from Topcabin and those turned out to be too short.
Not sure if 22mm motorcycle grips can be used since on 22.2mm bicycle handlebars. Throttle side is 25 mm so those are out of the question.
I think I can't use ergon style grips nor regular round grips after recent hook of hamate trauma which happened 14 months ago.
Edit.
I think these ones which have the smallest deameter outer size around the edge of the palm even compared to more expensive one might work better.
https://www.amazon.com/VELO-Kork-Lenkergriffe/dp/B07NZZMN8M

Last edited by sysrq; 11-20-23 at 04:59 PM.
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Old 11-20-23, 11:24 AM
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I used either ODI Rogues or a Specialized ergo grips. Never used a 50į sweep bar. My last bar was only 9į sweep.
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Old 11-20-23, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ofajen
You might want to check out post #7 in this thread:

Numb Hands

It describes how to optimally place your hands to put the weight on parts of the hands that can bear it best. It is focused on drop bars. I have used this as a guide in adjusting how I ride my swept back bars.

There are several illustrations showing the part of the palm that should bear weight and diagrams showing all the nerves in the center of the palm, which is the area that must not bear weight.

I have ridden many, many thousands of miles on 74 degree sweep classic touring bars (much of it single speed) with virtually no hand discomfort throughout that time. Iíve used ordinary Oury grips and either foam tape or cheap bar foam for the more forward sections of the bar.

For a 74 degree sweep, I find tilting the ends down about 10-11 degrees strikes a nice comfort compromise between the seated and standing riding positions. It may be different for 50 degree sweep so you will need to experiment.

With 74 degree sweep, it is also possible to use the grips with the thumb aligned on top of the bar and bearing weight on the pad of the thumb. That area can also bear weight, but avoid using a grip that places weight between thumb and forefinger. Many nerves there.

Actually, I think when I put thumbs aligned on the bars the weight is still mainly on the outer palm region. That just avoids any chance of putting weight between thumb and forefinger.

Otto
Is this shape any good for hook of hamate pain/sensitivity due to trauma which happened 14 months ago?
https://www.amazon.com/VELO-Kork-Len...dp/B07NZZMN8M#

Last edited by sysrq; 11-20-23 at 09:03 PM.
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Old 11-20-23, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
Is this shape any good for hook of hamate pain/sensitivity due to trauma which happened 14 months ago?
https://www.amazon.com/VELO-Kork-Len...dp/B07NZZMN8M#
Thatís not something Iím familiar with, and I am neither a sports doctor nor physical therapist. If you are under treatment, you should consult such a person.

The grips you link look to be nearly cylindrical and I would tend to think not much different from ones with straighter side profile. If you arenít under treatment and concerned with re-injury, I guess there is no harm in giving them a try. I like soft foam grips on my bars.

Otto
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Old 11-20-23, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by ofajen
Thatís not something Iím familiar with, and I am neither a sports doctor nor physical therapist. If you are under treatment, you should consult such a person.

The grips you link look to be nearly cylindrical and I would tend to think not much different from ones with straighter side profile. If you arenít under treatment and concerned with re-injury, I guess there is no harm in giving them a try. I like soft foam grips on my bars.

Otto
The so called Thorn Anatomical grips are also nearly cylindrical so I think at some point overly curved side profile might be counter intuitive.
There wasn't any active treatment prescribed by doctors 14 months ago for FOOSH injury, but the hook of hamate area is still sensitive.
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Old 11-20-23, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ofajen
You might want to check out post #7 in this thread:

Numb Hands

It describes how to optimally place your hands to put the weight on parts of the hands that can bear it best. It is focused on drop bars. I have used this as a guide in adjusting how I ride my swept back bars.

There are several illustrations showing the part of the palm that should bear weight and diagrams showing all the nerves in the center of the palm, which is the area that must not bear weight.

I have ridden many, many thousands of miles on 74 degree sweep classic touring bars (much of it single speed) with virtually no hand discomfort throughout that time. Iíve used ordinary Oury grips and either foam tape or cheap bar foam for the more forward sections of the bar.

For a 74 degree sweep, I find tilting the ends down about 10-11 degrees strikes a nice comfort compromise between the seated and standing riding positions. It may be different for 50 degree sweep so you will need to experiment.

With 74 degree sweep, it is also possible to use the grips with the thumb aligned on top of the bar and bearing weight on the pad of the thumb. That area can also bear weight, but avoid using a grip that places weight between thumb and forefinger. Many nerves there.

Actually, I think when I put thumbs aligned on the bars the weight is still mainly on the outer palm region. That just avoids any chance of putting weight between thumb and forefinger.

Otto
According to the "post #7 in this thread:" the weight should be exactly where the hook of hamate is. Is there any textbook solution in case of hook of hamate trauma?
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Old 11-21-23, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
According to the "post #7 in this thread:" the weight should be exactly where the hook of hamate is. Is there any textbook solution in case of hook of hamate trauma?
I interpret the figure to suggest putting weight on the outer padded part of the palm which is mostly above the outer two metacarpals. But I donít have hamate sensitivity, so you may need to do things differently if that is also affecting the hamate bone.

The pad over the thumb metacarpal can also take some weight without bearing on major nerves. In some positions, I have both of those regions bearing some weight.

Otto
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Old 11-21-23, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by ofajen
I interpret the figure to suggest putting weight on the outer padded part of the palm which is mostly above the outer two metacarpals. But I donít have hamate sensitivity, so you may need to do things differently if that is also affecting the hamate bone.

The pad over the thumb metacarpal can also take some weight without bearing on major nerves. In some positions, I have both of those regions bearing some weight.

Otto
This suggests that I might need handlebars with 90į sweep such as drop, north road, roadster or bull horn to put the weight on thumb metacarpal. On the other hand usually putting too much weight directly on muscles such as Abductor pollicis Brevis usually feels more uncomfortable than on bones.

Last edited by sysrq; 11-21-23 at 01:35 PM.
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Old 11-21-23, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by sysrq
This suggests that I might need handlebars with 90į sweep such as drop, north road, roadster or bull horn to put the weight on thumb metacarpal. On the other hand usually putting too much weight directly on muscles such as Abductor pollicis Brevis usually feels more uncomfortable than on bones.

Could be. For whatever reason, I have no trouble bearing weight on those two larger muscles: abductor pollicis brevis (thumb) and abductor digiti minimi (pinky). I donít want weight borne where bones arenít padded by muscles or over main nerves.

Otto
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Old 11-21-23, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
I have heard that excessively soft grips cause "pump," that is, your hands continually, tire loosen and re-tighten as you unconsciously seek a firm grip but cannot ever fully achieve it because of the padding. I assume that you will try some of the other excellent advice offered hear .... also consider hand exercises if there is some specific and personal situation where your hands just need a boost.

Hope you enjoy your rides and your life more each time.
I don't know about this ("pump") but I am firmly of the belief that handlebars, extensions and brake levers should be ridden and adjusted on rides before any grips, padding, tape or gloves are used. Yes, your hands tiring because the slip and having to work harder to stay in place may limit how far you can go but the point is to get the bar dialed in so hand positions aren't sitting on the wrong bones or pinching nerves or arteries. Bare metal is the best way to find that. And as you go to the padding after finding that position, it will became obvious when too much padding is causing an issue.
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