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Should I "Hoard" Mechanical High End Parts?

Old 11-09-23, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Attilio
I ride a lot of miles.... I have been riding bikes as adult since 2018ish and never had to replace a cable. Ever. SNIP.
At some point you will be replacing cables. Hope you live and ride in a flat area. When your shifter cable breaks on your road bike you will have a small ring only or small cog only for the duration of your ride until you get it replaced. If your shop charges by the hour you might end up paying more for them to dig out the broken bits of cable from your shifter. Cables cost $5 or so depending on quality. If changed on a regular basis you will notice a little shifting smoothness increase with new cables.

As far as hoarding. I say not! But it's your money and your family will have to deal with disposal when you are gone. I don't hoard, but I do try to keep well stocked in nearly all things. Cables, bar tape, tires, tubes, and co2 cartridges. When I build a wheel I get a couple extra spokes of each length.
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Old 11-09-23, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
I can certainly see the point to buying brifters (STI levers for the squeamish) and derailleurs, but past that, I cannot see where parts should become hard to find. I am sure there will be firms buying up old Shimano patents or just making knock-offs of old parts when Shimano is full wireless electronic and riders wear halos with electrodes into their scalps for shifting and braking.
No! Don't give Shimano any ideas.
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Old 11-09-23, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
I can certainly see the point to buying brifters (STI levers for the squeamish) and derailleurs, but past that, I cannot see where parts should become hard to find. I am sure there will be firms buying up old Shimano patents or just making knock-offs of old parts when Shimano is full wireless electronic and riders wear halos with electrodes into their scalps for shifting and braking.
I used to say that I love the Dura Ace group on my Ritchey because it shifts as easy as thought. The above is NOT what I meant!!
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Old 11-09-23, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
No! Don't give Shimano any ideas.
Just think - you could get the telekinesis version of shifting the rider you're passing into a higher gear, a la Team Cinzano in "Breaking Away".
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Old 11-09-23, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan
The maintenance of mechanical shifting is not with the components themselves, it's with the cables.

If you only ride your bike on weekends and in good weather, they can last a long time. For people riding high mileage in all weather, cables have to be replaced annually at the minimum, sometimes more. Yes, even with high end cable kits. And when you replace the cables, you have to rewrap the bars, even if the tape is still ok.

After years upon years of doing this, it gets old. I'm in the gradual process of transitioning my bikes to electronic shifting, and I don't think I'll buy another cable system in my life.
Maybe not, but I bet you will be buying more electronic parts to replace the faulty ones at 20X the cost of cables. I hope I'm wrong.
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Old 11-09-23, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by RH Clark
Maybe not, but I bet you will be buying more electronic parts to replace the faulty ones at 20X the cost of cables. I hope I'm wrong.
Electronics are proving to be pretty reliable. Replacement batteries are probably the only ongoing cost and they should last a few years at least. It’s not a very demanding power application.
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Old 11-09-23, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan

After years upon years of doing this, it gets old. I'm in the gradual process of transitioning my bikes to electronic shifting, and I don't think I'll buy another cable system in my life.

If you go fix gear, you won't need brakes, or cables. Just saying...
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Old 11-09-23, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
No! Don't give Shimano any ideas.
I was thinking Shimano should offer a CVT (continuously variable transmission) like in some Subarus. Whenever your RPM drops below, or above, a certain predetermined number it automagically down or up shifts. Could get crazy on steep climbs though.
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Old 11-09-23, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by kommisar
If you go fix gear, you won't need brakes, or cables. Just saying...
If you get a unicycle, then you won’t need that extra wheel, steering device, chain, heavy frame or brakes. Just saying…
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Old 11-10-23, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I was thinking Shimano should offer a CVT (continuously variable transmission) like in some Subarus. Whenever your RPM drops below, or above, a certain predetermined number it automagically down or up shifts. Could get crazy on steep climbs though.
CVT on a bike doesn't appeal to me at all. The last thing I want is to be pedalling the same monotonous cadence for hours on end.
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Old 11-10-23, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I was thinking Shimano should offer a CVT (continuously variable transmission) like in some Subarus. Whenever your RPM drops below, or above, a certain predetermined number it automagically down or up shifts. Could get crazy on steep climbs though.
I can see a cell phone app in conjunction with wireless electronic doing something very like that. Easypeasy

You can thank me later
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Old 11-10-23, 10:23 AM
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It isn't as extreme as all-out hoarding, but I do like to save spare parts, old components,etc. It's worked out, as I've been able to cannibalize broken components to keep another on the road. I even recently built up another road bike on a frame I repaired, using Ultegra 6800(from a previous bike) that had been sitting on the shelf for years.

Most of my bikes are fairly modern, so they usually don't require much out of basic maintenance, but I do like to "tinker" on them. I find it relaxing and is my way to unwind, instead of plopping down in front of a TV. I have a metal lathe and a mill, so I can and do occasionally make small parts for them. My latest venture has been making things out of carbon fiber.

As far as cables wearing out, I replace the shift cables on my Shimano bikes annually. I've had the aforementioned 6800 snap a cable inside the shifter before. It was in the middle of a long day in the mountains, luckily it was for the front, so I still had useful climbing gears. The rear cable for Ultegra 8000 on my main ride, almost failed earlier this year. Shifting performance was degrading during a ride...when I finally took it apart, the cable was being held together by a couple of strands.
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Old 11-10-23, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
CVT on a bike doesn't appeal to me at all. The last thing I want is to be pedalling the same monotonous cadence for hours on end.
Completely agree, but it might work for the ‘unwashed masses’. All it would need is a strain/Wattage gauge. Think there is already a bike or bikes out there with something similar. On second thought, with the popularity of e-bikes, it would not work.
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Old 11-10-23, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I was thinking Shimano should offer a CVT (continuously variable transmission) like in some Subarus. Whenever your RPM drops below, or above, a certain predetermined number it automagically down or up shifts. Could get crazy on steep climbs though.
I want to see "erg" mode on bikes.
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Old 11-10-23, 05:44 PM
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When I need to shop for parts for any of my 6 bikes, I shop in my garage, where I’ve stored enough of my beloved first-generation shimano 10-speed parts to outlast all the “newest and best” crap. Bike shops and online sites no longer have anything for me. And eBay is quickly running dry of 6600/5600/7800 parts.
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Old 11-10-23, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bocobiking
When I need to shop for parts for any of my 6 bikes, I shop in my garage, where I’ve stored enough of my beloved first-generation shimano 10-speed parts to outlast all the “newest and best” crap. Bike shops and online sites no longer have anything for me. And eBay is quickly running dry of 6600/5600/7800 parts.
I am all for hoarding what one likes and/or runs, but how are Shimano's first-gen 10-speed (5600/6600/7800) components better than its second-gen 10-speed (5700/6700/7900) or its subsequent two generations of 11-speed mechanical components!?
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Old 11-10-23, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
I want to see "erg" mode on bikes.
The other day I forgot that I'd swapped wheels on my bike, so the chain was on Biggie Smalls when I tried to start riding. I'm pretty sure I said "Erg!", as well as few saltier words/sounds.
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Old 11-10-23, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
I am all for hoarding what one likes and/or runs, but how are Shimano's first-gen 10-speed (5600/6600/7800) components better than its second-gen 10-speed (5700/6700/7900) or its subsequent two generations of 11-speed mechanical components!?
The 7800 STIs and RD on my Ritchey just shift better than the R7000s on my Canyon or the R8000s on my Litespeed. Plus the Canyon needed a new RD cable before it got to 5000 miles. The STIs where the cable DOESN'T come out the side are somewhat notorious for short cable lifespan.
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Old 11-10-23, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by genejockey
The other day I forgot that I'd swapped wheels on my bike, so the chain was on Biggie Smalls when I tried to start riding. I'm pretty sure I said "Erg!", as well as few saltier words/sounds.
Pantani said "Arrrgh" when that happened to him.
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Old 11-10-23, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
I am all for hoarding what one likes and/or runs, but how are Shimano's first-gen 10-speed (5600/6600/7800) components better than its second-gen 10-speed (5700/6700/7900) or its subsequent two generations of 11-speed mechanical components!?
First generation shifts better/smoother than second (I've tried both). Cable routing for the first generation is much easier to work on, and much, much easier than on the r7000 and r8000s (my wife has these). Plus, there are no triple cranksets when you get to 11-speed, and I love triples.
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Old 11-11-23, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb
20 years ago you would have said the same thing about 9 speed parts.
I would not because 9 speed drivetrains 20 years ago weren't going to be replaced with electronic shifters of which I wish to have no part of. I posted that as my motivation.
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Old 11-11-23, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by kommisar
If you go fix gear, you won't need brakes, or cables. Just saying...
I tried one for all of 40 yards down my street and had to fall to stop. No way. I bought it cheap just to try it and donated it to the local charity recycle a bike immediately. Good riddance.

If you look at my posts though I do enjoy riding single speed I have a Salsa Stormchaser that I absolutely enjoy. The 34/17 gearing is also acceptable for most mild to moderate hills but when it gets to more than 6-7% for more than say a 1/4 mile I can't do it.
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Old 11-11-23, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I was thinking Shimano should offer a CVT (continuously variable transmission) like in some Subarus. Whenever your RPM drops below, or above, a certain predetermined number it automagically down or up shifts. Could get crazy on steep climbs though.
We got a base model forester with CVT it gets great gas mileage if you drive easy with it but no fun at all. I miss the manual transmission. If I had the money 10-20 years ago I would have bought a bunch of cars with manuals to collect and enjoy. If you ride them like 2-3k miles a year I would have had cars for life and never had to bother with hybrids, CVTs, electric or any of that baloney. Yes electric is like 3x as fast but its just one noted. You can power to 120mph in a straight line instantly but it gets old quick. It has too much torque to start rotating the rear end under power early in a curve so you feel the electronic nanny kickcing in and there's no way you can fully disable the stability control. Not that you'd want to with that much power its like driving on ice and you'd die. Wish I had an unmolested, low mileage Honda S2000 or an 80s/90's european sub 2000lb hot hatch a la Renault Clio Williams or Peugeot 205 1.9 GTI. As Colin Chapman the guy who started Lotus there's that quintessential performance ingredient that is no longer added to cars that improves *ALL* performance elements equally: adding lightness.
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Old 11-11-23, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Attilio
We got a base model forester with CVT it gets great gas mileage if you drive easy with it but no fun at all. I miss the manual transmission. If I had the money 10-20 years ago I would have bought a bunch of cars with manuals to collect and enjoy. If you ride them like 2-3k miles a year I would have had cars for life and never had to bother with hybrids, CVTs, electric or any of that baloney. Yes electric is like 3x as fast but its just one noted. You can power to 120mph in a straight line instantly but it gets old quick. It has too much torque to start rotating the rear end under power early in a curve so you feel the electronic nanny kickcing in and there's no way you can fully disable the stability control. Not that you'd want to with that much power its like driving on ice and you'd die. Wish I had an unmolested, low mileage Honda S2000 or an 80s/90's european sub 2000lb hot hatch a la Renault Clio Williams or Peugeot 205 1.9 GTI. As Colin Chapman the guy who started Lotus there's that quintessential performance ingredient that is no longer added to cars that improves *ALL* performance elements equally: adding lightness.
I’ve got a Tesla and a 1982 Porsche 911. The latter never gets driven anymore. Track mode on the Tesla is an option for less restrictive stability control.

The problem with those lightweight 80s hot hatches is when you crash into a modern car. You die while they walk away with a bit of air bag rash.

Life moves on and when new things start to seem pointless it probably just means you are getting jaded with life. But I agree that a CVT Forester is never going to be fun to drive!
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Old 11-11-23, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
I am all for hoarding what one likes and/or runs, but how are Shimano's first-gen 10-speed (5600/6600/7800) components better than its second-gen 10-speed (5700/6700/7900) or its subsequent two generations of 11-speed mechanical components!?
Perhaps quality of manufacturing of Shimano's first-gen 10-speed (5600/6600/7800) components is better than the its second-gen 10-speed (5700/6700/7900) or its subsequent two generations of 11-speed mechanical components. Dura Ace 7800 cranks didn't break and DA 7800 shifters barely encountered issues they weren't cable eating shifters because the ****ing cable were external not internal unlike their followers. I only buy Dura Ace 7800 for all my bike projects because it is fully reliable light and not finnicky. Dura Ace 7800 isn't cheap regarding spare parts yes, but quality wise it is stellar , I prefer to spend my money on DA 7800 High End parts than on DA7900, 9000,9100 and 9200 High End parts
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