Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Crank or Pedal Power Meter

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Crank or Pedal Power Meter

Old 12-10-23, 08:56 AM
  #1  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Crank or Pedal Power Meter

Hello everyone,
I recently got a new bike and I'm currently thinking about a power Meter for the next year. But I don't know if I want to get a Crank or a Pedal power meter. The bike is brand new, so it doesn't need a new crank. So If I order a crank power meter without factory install I have two cranks and don't use one of them (for me this opinion makes no sense). The other option is to get a factory install of the power meter on my crank, but I don't have any mechanical experiences so I don't want to remove and assemble the crank. And then there is the third option with the Pedal power Meter. At first, this sounds like the best option for me, because I can use it on different bikes. But what do you guys say? and if you say the pedal power meter is a good opinion, which can you recommend? (I have a shimano spd sl pedal system)
lupo68288 is offline  
Old 12-10-23, 09:45 AM
  #2  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Favreo Assioma power pedals. If on a budget, just get the left. Very easy to switch between bikes.
katyjcrow is offline  
Likes For katyjcrow:
Old 12-10-23, 10:10 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 2,019

Bikes: addict, aethos, creo, vanmoof, sirrus, public ...

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1269 Post(s)
Liked 1,377 Times in 703 Posts
some questions - what crank set does your bike have? do you know if your two legs are balanced? will you be annoyed to be without the bike for a few weeks?

if you’re ok with one sided power (many people are very balanced), and don’t want to be without the bike, a left side 4iii precision on a refurb crank is as little as $220, and they also have a crank buyback for your existing one (or put it on eBay), so you’ll be out <$200 and never without your bike. taking off the left crank arm is not much harder than changing pedals, or a shop will do it while you wait for $20 probably.

i’ve used a few 4iiii crank based meters and they’re simple, reliable, long battery life, good support, super lightweight, not bulky or in the way, and you can use whatever pedals you want or currently like. have heard similar things about stages, but they’re more expensive at the moment.
__________________
mschwett is offline  
Likes For mschwett:
Old 12-10-23, 10:22 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,772
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4046 Post(s)
Liked 4,436 Times in 2,754 Posts
+1 for single-side 4iiii crank meter. Fitting a LH crank is pretty trivial. Keep the standard crank to replace if you ever sell the bike.
PeteHski is online now  
Old 12-10-23, 11:19 AM
  #5  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,807

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3178 Post(s)
Liked 3,274 Times in 1,649 Posts
Originally Posted by katyjcrow
Favreo Assioma power pedals. If on a budget, just get the left. Very easy to switch between bikes.
Assioma is a great power option, I've been using the one-sided power pedal for years.

The OP says they are using SPD-SL, so they will need the Assioma DUO-Shi kit that mounts to their existing pedals. It's a two-sided kit.
Designed for the compatibility with Shimano® road
The Favero Assioma DUO-Shi power meter has been designed for Shimano® road users, as it offers the opportunity to keep on riding with your current Shimano® pedal bodies* without giving up on the trustability and precision of Assioma.
*Assioma DUO-Shi is compatible with the following Shimano® SPD-SL® pedal bodies: PD-R8000, PD-R7000, PD-6800, PD-R550 and PD-R540.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

Zwift: Terry Morse [OldAF]
ROUVY: terrymorse





terrymorse is offline  
Old 12-10-23, 11:24 AM
  #6  
LR÷P=HR
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,084

Bikes: Holdsworth 1979 Special, C-dale 1993 MT3000 Tandem & 1996 F700CAD3, Cervelo 2022 R5 & 2018 R3, JustGo Runt, Ridley Oval, Kickr Bike 8-)

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 828 Post(s)
Liked 1,113 Times in 644 Posts
I’ve both crank and pedal PM’s.
Stages dual (crank) was my first, Garmin Rally dual was my second purchase.

Both are easy to install.
Both are easy to use.

Stages uses cheap & locally available 2032 batteries.
Garmin batteries are tougher to find locally and are more expensive.

Garmin can provide additional data with their cycling dynamics.
Garmin will permit a change in crank length or even a quick bicycle change if you wish.

I suspect the life of the Garmin will prove to be shorter & their rebuild kit is not cheap.


In Summary, I will be sticking with pedal based PM’s in the future due to the flexibility.

Barry

Last edited by Barry2; 12-10-23 at 02:38 PM.
Barry2 is offline  
Old 12-10-23, 11:59 AM
  #7  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2023
Location: NY
Posts: 2

Bikes: 3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Choosing between a crank-based power meter and a pedal-based power meter depends on your specific needs, preferences, and the type of cycling you do. Both types have their advantages and considerations:

### Crank-Based Power Meter:

**Pros:**

1. **Accuracy:** Crank-based power meters are known for their accuracy. They measure power directly at the point where force is applied to the pedals.

2. **Transferability:** If you have multiple bikes, you only need to swap out the crankset to move the power meter between them.

3. **Durability:** Crank-based power meters are often sturdy and durable, capable of handling different conditions and riding styles.

**Cons:**

1. **Installation:** Installation might require more effort than a pedal-based power meter. You might need special tools or professional assistance.

2. **Compatibility:** Crank-based power meters may not be compatible with all types of cranks or bottom brackets.

### Pedal-Based Power Meter:

**Pros:**

1. **Ease of Installation:** Pedal-based power meters are generally easier to install compared to crank-based options. They can be easily swapped between bikes.

2. **Compatibility:** Pedal-based power meters are often compatible with a wide range of cranksets and frames.

3. **Upgradability:** If you upgrade your bike, you can easily transfer the pedal-based power meter.

**Cons:**

1. **Weight:** Pedal-based power meters may add more weight to your bike compared to crank-based options.

2. **Durability:** Depending on the brand and model, some pedal-based power meters may be more susceptible to damage from crashes or rough handling.

3. **Cost:** Some pedal-based power meters can be more expensive than crank-based options.

### Considerations:

1. **Budget:** Determine your budget, as this can significantly influence your options.

2. **Bike Compatibility:** Ensure that the power meter is compatible with your bike's frame, crankset, and bottom bracket.

3. **Transferability:** Consider whether you'll be using the power meter on multiple bikes and how easy it is to transfer.

4. **Features:** Compare additional features offered by different models, such as Bluetooth/ANT+ compatibility, battery life, and software compatibility.

5. **Accuracy:** While most power meters are accurate, it's worth considering reviews and user feedback regarding accuracy.

6. **Brand and Support:** Choose a reputable brand with good customer support and warranty options.

Ultimately, both crank-based and pedal-based power meters can provide accurate and valuable data for training and performance analysis. Your choice may come down to personal preferences, ease of use, and your specific cycling needs.
Keith Bailey is offline  
Likes For Keith Bailey:
Old 12-10-23, 12:58 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,772
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4046 Post(s)
Liked 4,436 Times in 2,754 Posts
Originally Posted by Keith Bailey

### Crank-Based Power Meter:

**Pros:**

1. **Accuracy:** Crank-based power meters are known for their accuracy. They measure power directly at the point where force is applied to the pedals.

.
AI bot comedy gold ^ 😂
PeteHski is online now  
Old 12-10-23, 01:22 PM
  #9  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,531

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5998 Post(s)
Liked 4,626 Times in 3,191 Posts
If the money to buy dual sided pedal based PM's is very trivial to your finances, then why not? But single sided will give you much more than you have now. And for much less if you go with a very good crank based brand as opposed to a less expensive but not quite so good pedal based brand. And as for whether your power is balanced left and right, it's not that big a deal. Any effort you take to strengthen the weaker leg is really just ignoring the other leg and not increasing it's potential at the same time.

What is your current crankset? If it's most any of the 2 piece Shimano cranksets, then you can just get a left side crankarm with a PM. 4iiii has some pretty decent prices for a left side crankarm. And all you really have to do is match the crankarm length. Doesn't matter if your crankset is a Tiagra or some other Shimano 2 piece hollowtech II crank. DuraAce, Ultegra, 105, or Tiagra crankarms all fit on the left side of that crankset.

I doubt any will notice that you have a different crank on the other side that they can't see at the same time. You might not be getting your true power, but it'll be close enough. And again, much better than none.

If you do go with a 1 sided crank based PM, then the 4iiii and I assume others are able to work together to give you 2 sided PM info if you ever decide later to get a right side PM.

However if you are competing regularly at a amatuer or higher level, then my advice will change and tell you to get the dual sided pedal or dual sided crank PM. But still, only if it's effect on your wallet is of little notice.

Last edited by Iride01; 12-10-23 at 01:29 PM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 12-11-23, 03:42 AM
  #10  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
If the money to buy dual sided pedal based PM's is very trivial to your finances, then why not? But single sided will give you much more than you have now. And for much less if you go with a very good crank based brand as opposed to a less expensive but not quite so good pedal based brand. And as for whether your power is balanced left and right, it's not that big a deal. Any effort you take to strengthen the weaker leg is really just ignoring the other leg and not increasing it's potential at the same time.

What is your current crankset? If it's most any of the 2 piece Shimano cranksets, then you can just get a left side crankarm with a PM. 4iiii has some pretty decent prices for a left side crankarm. And all you really have to do is match the crankarm length. Doesn't matter if your crankset is a Tiagra or some other Shimano 2 piece hollowtech II crank. DuraAce, Ultegra, 105, or Tiagra crankarms all fit on the left side of that crankset.

I doubt any will notice that you have a different crank on the other side that they can't see at the same time. You might not be getting your true power, but it'll be close enough. And again, much better than none.

If you do go with a 1 sided crank based PM, then the 4iiii and I assume others are able to work together to give you 2 sided PM info if you ever decide later to get a right side PM.

However if you are competing regularly at a amatuer or higher level, then my advice will change and tell you to get the dual sided pedal or dual sided crank PM. But still, only if it's effect on your wallet is of little notice.
I have the newest Ultegra Crank. I think it is the FC-R8100.
lupo68288 is offline  
Old 12-12-23, 12:42 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
DMC707's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,387

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1764 Post(s)
Liked 1,112 Times in 739 Posts
Garmin pedals
DMC707 is offline  
Likes For DMC707:
Old 12-12-23, 12:59 PM
  #12  
Dead but dreaming
 
KJ43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Bay Area, CA (East Bay - Contra Costa County)
Posts: 403

Bikes: 2020 Santa Cruz Stigmata, 2022 Cannondale Synapse

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by DMC707
Garmin pedals
Maybe the Garmin SPD-SL pedal is different but I gave the SPD pedals a try and the stack height was so much more than a Shimano pedal and the cleat mechanism was noticeably less smooth as well. I sold them after giving them a solid try and went to a crank based power meter.

I have 4iiii dual power meters on my GRX crankset (Precision Pro) and a 4iiii single left side on my road bike (Precision 3). Both work well once paired. They do go through batteries quickly but just need to keep monitoring and it's easy to replace them when required.

Also, 4iiii has excellent customer service. I accidentally popped a copper contact off of one of my power meters when I was trying to bend them up to increase the contact pressure against the battery. I reached out to their support and offered to pay for a fix but they just said to send it back and then they sent me a new crank with power meter to replace the broken one.
KJ43 is offline  
Old 12-12-23, 01:21 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
DMC707's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,387

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1764 Post(s)
Liked 1,112 Times in 739 Posts
Originally Posted by KJ43
Maybe the Garmin SPD-SL pedal is different but I gave the SPD pedals a try and the stack height was so much more than a Shimano pedal and the cleat mechanism was noticeably less smooth as well. I sold them after giving them a solid try and went to a crank based power meter.

.
The price on the 4iii systems are compelling . I'd like to try one on my mountain bike - measuring power on an mtb is wonky because of all the coasting and slow technical work, so you'll have big power spikes at times up to 400-450 watts but then after 2 hours , states your average output was 72 watts or something. But its still cool to see the big spikes on climbs or fireroad sections. But alas, i have been dabbling with flat pedals a lot on the MTB for the past year so my Garmins are usually out,

I must admit that i use Garmin for everything i can much the same way i use Apple for all my smartphones and tablets. Everything seems to integrate seamlessly and communicate well with each other, from the power pedals to the watches to the bike computer.

But i will very much admit that i am biased because of my good luck with the brand and most of its products i have tried ----- BUUUUUT - i really dont have any experience with the other brands to say anything negative at all. (outside of a legit SRM crank based power meter on my track bike way back in the day - which was serious gear for serious training. I dont honestly need gear that hardcore now)
DMC707 is offline  
Likes For DMC707:
Old 12-12-23, 01:30 PM
  #14  
Dead but dreaming
 
KJ43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Bay Area, CA (East Bay - Contra Costa County)
Posts: 403

Bikes: 2020 Santa Cruz Stigmata, 2022 Cannondale Synapse

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by DMC707
The price on the 4iii systems are compelling . I'd like to try one on my mountain bike - measuring power on an mtb is wonky because of all the coasting and slow technical work, so you'll have big power spikes at times up to 400-450 watts but then after 2 hours , states your average output was 72 watts or something. But its still cool to see the big spikes on climbs or fireroad sections. But alas, i have been dabbling with flat pedals a lot on the MTB for the past year so my Garmins are usually out,

I must admit that i use Garmin for everything i can much the same way i use Apple for all my smartphones and tablets. Everything seems to integrate seamlessly and communicate well with each other, from the power pedals to the watches to the bike computer.

But i will very much admit that i am biased because of my good luck with the brand and most of its products i have tried ----- BUUUUUT - i really dont have any experience with the other brands to say anything negative at all. (outside of a legit SRM crank based power meter on my track bike way back in the day - which was serious gear for serious training. I dont honestly need gear that hardcore now)
I have a Garmin 1030+ for a head unit and every device I have connected to it works pretty seamlessly so far. It shows me the firmware, battery level, left/right balance, etc. for the 4iiii PM's without issue. I like pretty much all of the Garmin devices but not a big fan of Connect.
KJ43 is offline  
Old 12-12-23, 02:50 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 8,783

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2539 Post(s)
Liked 1,858 Times in 1,167 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
AI bot comedy gold ^ 😂
2 posts and you get a page and a half of (supposedly) in-depth, technical "knowledge"??

I'd call it plagiarism instead of comedy.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 12-12-23, 03:00 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,772
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4046 Post(s)
Liked 4,436 Times in 2,754 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb
2 posts and you get a page and a half of (supposedly) in-depth, technical "knowledge"??

I'd call it plagiarism instead of comedy.
The comedy was what the AI quoted as the first pro of a crank based power meter.
PeteHski is online now  
Old 12-16-23, 03:38 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: 757
Posts: 10,800

Bikes: Madone, Emonda, 5500, Ritchey Breakaway

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9836 Post(s)
Liked 4,881 Times in 2,089 Posts
I have both crank bases on most of my bikes, and one set of garmin that I can swap between the three bikes that don’t have power meters.

In my ideal world I would prefer to have all crank based power meters. I am not a fan of swapping parts from bike to bike. Want to be able to grab and go.

Two of my bikes have stages. I have had zero issues with these. Battery last a long time, and when compared to a bike that had rotor based, power seems accurate.

The garmin pedals are a love hate. As mentioned before, the fact I can swap easily is a huge plus, but I am not convinced they will last as long as the stages. They just feel cheap.
bampilot06 is offline  
Old 12-18-23, 01:58 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
msu2001la's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Posts: 2,846
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1434 Post(s)
Liked 1,470 Times in 862 Posts
I've had good experiences with Stages crank arm power meters. I have two of them (on two different bikes) - both were "refurbished" units that cost around $200.
Single sided is good enough for me. I don't really see the need for dual-sided.

The main benefit of pedal power meters would be the ability to move from one bike to another. That said, swapping pedals isn't something you'll likely be doing on a daily basis, so this would be pretty specific uses. It would be great if you are going on a bike vacation and renting a bike, for example. It's probably not a great solution if you frequently switch between road and mountain bikes (and you might run different styles of pedals on those bikes anyway).
msu2001la is offline  
Old 12-18-23, 02:13 PM
  #19  
-------
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Tejas
Posts: 12,329
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9273 Post(s)
Liked 6,151 Times in 3,377 Posts
I have Stages left crank arm PMs on two bikes. One arm is a lot less expensive that a set of PM pedals, and when you run that across two or more bikes, it is a whole lot less expensive. The one sided reading is enough for what I do since I do not ride captively. The installation of the arm is so easy that it should not even be a concern.

I switch between bikes from day-to-day. Switching pedals seems like a lot of make work when the cost of two left arm PMs is less than a pair of two-sided pedal PMs.
Mojo31 is offline  
Old 12-18-23, 04:03 PM
  #20  
Full Member
 
Sierra_rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2023
Location: NorCal
Posts: 342

Bikes: Santa Cruz Blur 4 TR, Canyon Endurace cf sl, Canyon Ultimate cf slx, Canyon Strive enduro, Canyon Grizl sl8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 594 Times in 225 Posts
I've got a mixture of both. I've been running a 4iiii left-side crankarm PM for several years. I also have a set of one-sided Garmin Rally's with the SPD bodies.

The Ultegra 8000 crank w/4iiii 6800 PM arm is coming off of my main road bike and going on another road bike I built recently. In its place will be a new Ultegra FC08 crank(recall special for an old Ultegra 6800 I had.) For the power meter function, I'm going with dual-sided Favero power meter pedals(w/Shimano SPD-SL bodies.) I thought about having 4iiii doing a factory install on the new crank, but I like the thought of not losing the power meter when I upgrade bikes in the future. They're also a very affordable option for dual-sided capabilities. I don't know that I really need dual-sided, but it'll be interesting to see the results anyway.

As far as the Garmins, I swap those between my gravel bike, cyclocross bike, and XC mtb. I'm not totally stoked on the Garmins, I've noticed weird power data in the past(they occasionally read very low) and have even had to re-calibrate them mid-ride. However, they work just fine most of the time...besides, there aren't a ton of options for SPD style PM pedals.
Sierra_rider is offline  
Old 12-19-23, 01:31 AM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
The Chemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 962

Bikes: Waltly Custom Ti // Seaboard CX01 // Dahon Boardwalk

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 497 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by Sierra_rider
besides, there aren't a ton of options for SPD style PM pedals.
Yep, and as an SPD-only rider (got SPDs on all my bikes, including my dedicated road bike), that's why I went with crank spider power meters for my bikes instead of pedals. Much cheaper, too.
The Chemist is offline  
Old 12-19-23, 07:09 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2023
Location: Eastern Shore MD
Posts: 772

Bikes: Lemond Zurich/Trek ALR/Giant TCX/Sette CX1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 507 Post(s)
Liked 673 Times in 351 Posts
Originally Posted by The Chemist
Yep, and as an SPD-only rider (got SPDs on all my bikes, including my dedicated road bike), that's why I went with crank spider power meters for my bikes instead of pedals. Much cheaper, too.
I have a pair of Garmin pedals - my only non SPD type pedals. They were a gift, a great gift so I can't complain... they easily swap from bike to bike... but, I prefer SPD pedals and shoes that I can actually walk around in. And the road style pedals cause me to have knee pain, I can't seem to get my cleats in the correct position. I have zero pain from the SPD pedals.

If I was to buy a PM on my own, it would be crank or spider based. Single sided is fine for the average Joe rider.
Jughed is offline  
Old 12-20-23, 01:39 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,734
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked 205 Times in 130 Posts
Spider based crank options are getting pretty cheap these days too if you go chinese. Picked up an xcadey for my mtb for $300 at the start of summer.
Canker is offline  
Old 12-20-23, 09:24 PM
  #24  
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,886
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 955 Post(s)
Liked 459 Times in 323 Posts
Power pedals weren't readily available when I got my left crank power meter.

My left side 4iiii quit working, a few months out of warranty, in August 2020. 4iiii didn't help out with an out of warranty repair or even a discount on a replacement. Purchased March 2017, failed Aug 2020, about 5 months out of the 3 year warranty.

I rode for months without, but I missed having a power meter.
So I got a Stages left side in Jan 2021. I like the Stages more. A long lasting CR2032 and easy battery swap, twice a year typically. A "low battery" message on my Garmin. No more 1 second long fake power spikes that were high enough to distort the power curve charts after the ride. ( for example, second-by-second readings of 110w, 132w, 1150w, 73w, 96w, ...)

~~~
Dual sided
I considered upgrading my Stages to dual sided last year, but decided not to.
Reviews said that the chainring side doesn't seem to be as accurate (due to the complex form of modern cranksets?)
Power fluctuates second-by-second anyway, so the dual sided results would be mostly for left-right balance data, and perhaps a slightly more accurate watts number. But "within 10%" or "within 15%" of actual wattage is good enough for me, and I expect that it's actually closer than a 10% difference.

~~
I'm old, and don't use the power meter for structured training workouts. I "just ride".
What I like and use:
While riding:
1. hill climb pacing. I know my watts ranges for the 3 to 5 minute longer local climbs,and set some PRs recently by holding that power all the way up.
2. long efforts -- tall climbs, headwinds, longer mileage: seeing watts is always useful.
3. pulling in a group ride: I still don't have the best smooth, steady pace, but the power meter does help a lot for holding the steady effort on rolling terrain.
4. It gets me pushing harder on short, sprint-like efforts -- trying for higher watts readings.

On my Garmin 1040, I use the 3-second average the most: On the map routing page, it shows two data numbers: speed and watts. On the elevation chart page, the numbers are Grade% and watts.
I also have a "pacing" screen of numbers to switch to for hard efforts, showing heartrate, speed, distance, 1 second, 3 second, 10 second, and 30 second watts averages -- all are useful to see together.

Post ride:
Strava
subscriptions show power meter data for a ride, with Power Curves for this ride and a recent range of rides (the same chart as Golden Cheetah CP, below.) And a bar chart of time spent at various watt ranges.

Golden Cheetah ride analysis software -- it's free and open source. "too many" charts, but I mostly use 4 or 5 of them. I like it.
The most interesting chart is the CP chart: Critical Power. For a season of riding, it plots the best power number for all the ranges of riding time from a few seconds to the longest ride time. The current ride is also shown, and a selected segment of the ride can be highlighted. What's my best 1 minute power? 30 minutes (which always includes some coasting)? 20 second power?

I also look at the ride's stacked chart. X-axis is riding time. Charts for Power, W' Balance (an estimate of short term reserves), Heartrate, Speed, Grade%, Cadence. Interesting to zoom in on the big climbs.
Map: It can show the selected segment on the map of the ride -- where was that hard effort of the day?
Watts distribution bar chart -- how much time in each range of watts?

Trends: Golden Cheetah has a lot of tracking charts, very useful for training for peak fitness for a goal ride or racing season.
I check the PMC performance manager chart periodically. I usually see 2 years of riding. It tracks Coggan Acute training load (using the last 7 days) and Chronic training load (using the last 42 days). I see the lines trending up from spring into late summer, then falling back down late in the fall and winter. "how does this year compare to last year?"

Last edited by rm -rf; 12-20-23 at 09:30 PM.
rm -rf is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.