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Titanium “super bikes”

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Titanium “super bikes”

Old 02-25-24, 05:40 AM
  #151  
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling
I’ve had experience with 3 titanium bikes, an old Teledyne, a Panasonic MTB, and a Litespeed Tuscany. I am not a particularly aggressive rider, but all three bike developed cracks. I wouldn’t buy another titanium bike.
Despite the fact that we can find anecdotes of cracked ti frames via Google searches, breakages are rare and I believe the assertion that ti frames are more prone to breakage in normal use than other frame materials is hype/urban myth.

Three broken ti frames for one person is beyond rare. I'd suggest there's a common denominator for these three bikes which was a contributory factor.
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Old 02-25-24, 06:01 AM
  #152  
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Originally Posted by calamarichris
Jeez, me too. Never owned a ti superbike, but I always imagined they were indestructible as an SR-71. I've chipped a lot of paint off a steel Schwinn Peloton in Cat4 criteriums, and bent the bejeezus out of my Masi Gran Criterium on a guard rail, and snapped a carbon Felt frame while sprinting (and not even crashing). I just assumed Ti and the complex process needed to weld those tubes together meant it was impossible to break them.
If you search for images using "cracked titanium bike" as the search term, you'll find plenty. Probably no more than any other frame material, though, adjusting for the numbers of frames built of each material that are out there.

My take (considering metal frames only, since carbon can be manipulated to achieve wildly disparate design goals):

For strength, steel > titanium > aluminum; for lightness, aluminum > titanium > steel; for durability, all roughly equal (since no manufacturer wants to have to replace lots of frames under warranty, they're all designed for reasonable reliability); for ride comfort/quality (for a given geometry and, most importantly, wheelbase), all maybe roughly equal, though some people suggest that the ride of titanium bikes is superior.

Add in handling under load (not something a lot of people talk about) and, in my experience, the ranking is aluminum being slightly better than steel. (Experience with titanium is limited - only post-repair road testing back in my bike shop days.)

I loved riding my high-end steel bikes for 40 years; I've loved riding my high-end aluminum bikes for 15 years (there's some overlap, of course). Was never much tempted by titanium, especially after my first two friends who'd bought titanium bikes both cracked them. One of them received a warranty replacement frame and proceeded to crack that one, too. In fairness, though, he was a strong racer who averaged around 250 miles per week for most of the year.

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Old 02-25-24, 03:05 PM
  #153  
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Originally Posted by tankist
Sad to hear this. Do you happen to have photos of the cracks? I own a Ti bike and now am anxious to check it for imminent cracks. I need to know where to look for them.
Teledyne and the Panasonic had a history of being prone to cracking, that was due to the early days of making TI frames the technology wasn't good yet. The Litespeed did not have any history of cracking, but since Litespeed was an expensive bike, and it has a lifetime warranty the poster should have sent it back, which leads me to believe he's not being honest and just wants to berate titanium, or somehow severely abused the Litespeed and they wouldn't cover it under warranty. Nobody with a bike that expensive is going to pass up the warranty unless they got so much money they simply don't care.
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Old 02-25-24, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by easyupbug
Mike, with my vintage and newer Litespeeds and Moots you clearly boiled my experience into a coherent brief statement. Now 73 with higher bars, etc., my miles are going on my old Litespeed and my '91 Vitus:
Easyupbug - I have a question about your bike. What kind of handlebars are those ? I had ones just like them on my old Fuji and I loved them. I don't see ones like that anymore.
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Old 02-26-24, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by boomer58
Easyupbug - I have a question about your bike. What kind of handlebars are those ? I had ones just like them on my old Fuji and I loved them. I don't see ones like that anymore.
If this shape is what you are looking for Cinelli calls them Solida and Easton calls them "elliptical" for some unknown reason. PM me if you know what you need I have a lot of old bars.
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Old 02-26-24, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by easyupbug
If this shape is what you are looking for Cinelli calls them Solida and Easton calls them "elliptical" for some unknown reason. PM me if you know what you need I have a lot of old bars.
Deda calls them Anatomic
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Old 02-26-24, 05:27 PM
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Thank you Easyupbug and Camilo for you replies. Now I know. The stuff you learn on here, it's amazing. boomer
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Old 02-26-24, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
With a sample size of just 3 titanium frames, the margin of error is kind of big.

If the actual Ti failure rate is 10%, the chance of getting at least 1 failure is:

1 - (0.9 * 0.9 * 0.9) = 27%

Statistics rambling aside, point taken about the way the material is used being the most important factor.
Chewie! GO plug the professor into the Hyperdrive!
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Old 03-01-24, 06:40 PM
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Whats that rack in the third picture?
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