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Metal/Sintered AND Resin/Organic

Old 02-27-24, 12:23 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by csport
ftfy
Second-rank antisymmetric tensors.
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Old 02-27-24, 07:51 PM
  #27  
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I prefer organic pads on shimano flat bar brakes. My avid/sram variants squeal no matter what I do and have a worse feel to them. For road I like salmon kool stop pads, but shimano pads seem to do okay as well. I found doing forearm work made me strong enough to have better control on my old side pull single pivot brakes. Before as a teen I was just too weak to have good confidence with them.... even in the dry.
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Old 02-27-24, 10:11 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Iím waiting for someone to argue the case for resin front and metal rear 😂
Well now that this came up using resin front and metal back wouldn't be such a bad idea in mountain biking where the front is typically the slow down fast brake with limited use and the rear is a drag brake that stays on for quite long periods of time especially on tricky descents.

I just use all metal all the time. Clears ice faster than organic and has a better bite in the winter.

my mountain bike brakes have four pads per caliper so I could mix metal and organic inside one caliper though...
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Old 02-28-24, 03:16 AM
  #29  
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Yeap. In low-traction descent scenarios, it's the rear brake that's the workhorse operating just below or at controlled skid levels, and in the front you want a brake with a lot of modulation and less initial bite. That's resin.
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Old 02-28-24, 04:22 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Ron Damon
Yeap. In low-traction descent scenarios, it's the rear brake that's the workhorse operating just below or at controlled skid levels, and in the front you want a brake with a lot of modulation and less initial bite. That's resin.
So donít you want good modulation at both ends?

I only ever use sintered pads for winter mtb riding (they wear better in wet, gritty conditions) or for long alpine road descents where heat and fade is a major factor. For everything else I prefer the feel and quietness of organic pads for both Road and mtb, front and rear wheels. There should be no real need to mix pad types, other than because you can.
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Old 02-28-24, 05:10 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
So donít you want good modulation at both ends?

I only ever use sintered pads for winter mtb riding (they wear better in wet, gritty conditions) or for long alpine road descents where heat and fade is a major factor. For everything else I prefer the feel and quietness of organic pads for both Road and mtb, front and rear wheels. There should be no real need to mix pad types, other than because you can.
It's less important in the rear for the simple reason that losing traction in the rear is less serious than losing traction in the front.

So long as the characteristics of the pads differ -- and they do -- there could be a reason for exploiting the characteristics of each.
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Old 02-28-24, 05:18 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Ron Damon
It's less important in the rear for the simple reason that losing traction in the rear is less serious than losing traction in the front.

So long as the characteristics of the pads differ -- and they do -- there could be a reason for exploiting the characteristics of each.
I still donít understand why you would want to deliberately reduce your rear brake feel. Why not just use organic pads front and rear? If conditions are too harsh for those then switch to sintered pads.
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Old 02-28-24, 02:53 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I still donít understand why you would want to deliberately reduce your rear brake feel. Why not just use organic pads front and rear? If conditions are too harsh for those then switch to sintered pads.
Oh I thought it was a wear thing to use metallic in the rear. If you're going fast enough it's not unheard of to go through a set of organic/resin pads in a day, especially if the conditions are bad and you're doing mainly lift riding / downhill. Since the rear brake is the one you use by far the most it'd make sense to use a harder wearing pad there.

I don't ride nearly fast enough to worry about such matters. Nor do we have such mountains, where one could chew threw pads. But with the excess power my brakes have metallic works great.
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Old 02-28-24, 05:46 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by elcruxio
Oh I thought it was a wear thing to use metallic in the rear. If you're going fast enough it's not unheard of to go through a set of organic/resin pads in a day, especially if the conditions are bad and you're doing mainly lift riding / downhill. Since the rear brake is the one you use by far the most it'd make sense to use a harder wearing pad there.

I don't ride nearly fast enough to worry about such matters. Nor do we have such mountains, where one could chew threw pads. But with the excess power my brakes have metallic works great.
Yeah I guess if you are doing very long, steep descents dragging your rear brake. When conditions are bad enough to wear organic pads out in a day (Iíve been there and done that) I just use metallic pads front and rear.
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Old 02-28-24, 08:04 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by elcruxio

since the rear brake is the one you use by far the most it'd make sense to use a harder wearing pad there.

.
.
???
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Old 02-28-24, 10:27 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by t2p
.
???
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On fast technical mtb descents you can't really use the front brake all that much because you need that traction for keeping the tire spinning/steering. Front tire traction loss on technical descents is no fun. There's so many roots, rocks, holes etc coming toward the front tire at such a fast rate that you'd need to brake like an abs system (milliseconds long on off cycles). The rear tire has no such issues and it isn't a big issue, if the rear occasionally slips.

So for maintaining a comfortable speed the rear brake works much better. For harder braking you obviously need both, which requires some thought, ie. constanly planning where you could do a hard stop should the need arise.
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Old 02-29-24, 11:01 AM
  #37  
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LOL. More brake jokes. Resin is less grabby?? LOL. You must have cheapo one piston Shimano crap.
I only have one cable TRP Spyre caliper, on my Roholff14. And it's not a MTB. My front brake is a XL dyno drum brake on 2 bikes.
Since the drum lasts 6x as long, I use that for slowing modulation. When I want to get thrown off at a dead stop, I pull the rear resin pads.
It will skid in 1/100 of a sec. My only replacement pads were at 5,300 miles, half were on tour with 120 lbs bike.
NEITHER has ever squealed. The pads are Discstop HP BBB BBS53, " high performance compound".

My pretend brake is on the front of my CCM 3 speed, is a side pull with salmon pads. LOL. All they do is collect glaze. For 14,000 miles my Rohloff only had a long pull caliper, it was even more useless. So that's how good my drum brake was at stopping by itself. I had ZERO indication of fade or heating. I mostly let it go top speed until a corner. It actually broke my first fork 3 times it was so strong.
The small drum brake 3 speed isn't half as good as the XL.
My best stopper has both XL drum brakes, which are semi anti-lock. 39 to zero mph is about 60 feet. That's better than the GCN guys did from 32 mph, disc or caliper. LOL.

Last edited by GamblerGORD53; 02-29-24 at 11:06 AM.
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