Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Why are Modern Bikes So Expensive?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Why are Modern Bikes So Expensive?

Old 04-04-24, 03:58 PM
  #376  
The Wheezing Geezer
 
Fredo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Española, NM
Posts: 1,127

Bikes: 1976 Fredo Speciale, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr., Libertas mixte

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 429 Post(s)
Liked 1,019 Times in 483 Posts
Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged
Many people who worked in bike shops or were involved in the bicycle industry during that time can confirm the quality of that era. Any reputable shop needed the renowned Campagnolo Tool kit to properly prepare a frame for its customers. This involved chasing all threads, facing headsets and bottom brackets, and aligning dropouts. It was uncommon not to align a top-tier Italian or British brand by cold setting it to get it within an acceptable specification. Paint quality was no great shakes either.
Yeah, everything was garbage then...
Fredo76 is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 04:19 PM
  #377  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged
Isn't it just the pinnacle of irony that we nostalgically reminisce about the supposed glory days of Western-made goods during the 70s and 80s? I mean, come on, those decades were practically a masterclass in shoddy craftsmanship, rampant labor issues, and a dearth of genuine innovation. It's like a twisted paradox where we're supposed to believe that subpar quality and stagnation were somehow the hallmarks of excellence. Oh, but let's criticize the Asian manufacturers for their poor quality with no evidence or facts to support the argument.
I remember of what Trek back used to be in the 90's early 00's and same with Cannondale. I appreciate Giant as much as I appreciate Merida but also more especially 3Rensho, Zunow and Cherubim for those who have knowledge about very high end steel japanese bikes know that they are outstanding bikes. As for carbon wheels and other things I am very nitpicking then again I don't think that BTLOS or Vision wheels are better than Boyd or Zipp or Bontrager wheels,that is due that I may have a very different notion and perception of quality than you have. I never expect quality from a cheap or an averagely priced product.
georges1 is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 04:32 PM
  #378  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by Eric F
Why does being made in China or Taiwan automatically equal lower quality? If the same materials are used, under the same quality control standards, by humans with equal skills, wouldn't the quality be the same? Just because the workers in those countries are paid less than US workers doesn't necessarily mean they are less skilled at their job.
Giant and Merida are taiwainese brands and make both fine bikes, as a fact I own two Giants and a Merida that I absolutely love. I am speaking about brands such as Cannondale and Trek who have outsourced their production, the quality of the welds on cannondales is not comparable to what was made in Bedford and for the Trek the OCLV HC was entirely made in the US not the case of today carbon made Treks, maybe I am nostalgic of a time that doesn't exist anymore. This is what I think is a forever debate, some are fine with newer stuff and some aren't adopting to it but to each their own .
georges1 is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 04:54 PM
  #379  
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 5,669
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2648 Post(s)
Liked 3,204 Times in 1,828 Posts
Originally Posted by Fredo76
Yeah, everything was garbage then...
That's putting it far too strongly. The best bikes back then were beautiful and simple. I remember all the pro-level steel bikes that I rode and raced in the '60's, '70's, '80's, and '90's with pleasure and pride. That bikes have evolved since then takes nothing away from the past.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 06:17 PM
  #380  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 18,392

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10643 Post(s)
Liked 12,298 Times in 6,297 Posts
Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged
Many people who worked in bike shops or were involved in the bicycle industry during that time can confirm the quality of that era. Any reputable shop needed the renowned Campagnolo Tool kit to properly prepare a frame for its customers. This involved chasing all threads, facing headsets and bottom brackets, and aligning dropouts. It was uncommon not to align a top-tier Italian or British brand by cold setting it to get it within an acceptable specification. Paint quality was no great shakes either.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrypnWDlkKM
BTW, I LOVE that channel. I can't understand a word he's saying, but I don't need to. It's like porn for C&V gearheads.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 06:31 PM
  #381  
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,774

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11100 Post(s)
Liked 7,699 Times in 4,288 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
I remember of what Trek back used to be in the 90's early 00's and same with Cannondale. I appreciate Giant as much as I appreciate Merida but also more especially 3Rensho, Zunow and Cherubim for those who have knowledge about very high end steel japanese bikes know that they are outstanding bikes. As for carbon wheels and other things I am very nitpicking then again I don't think that BTLOS or Vision wheels are better than Boyd or Zipp or Bontrager wheels,that is due that I may have a very different notion and perception of quality than you have. I never expect quality from a cheap or an averagely priced product.
oof. Your posts often contain errors, but this is another level of incorrect comments and unrelated posting.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 06:44 PM
  #382  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,573
Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3261 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,535 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
I remember of what Trek back used to be in the 90's early 00's and same with Cannondale. I appreciate Giant as much as I appreciate Merida but also more especially 3Rensho, Zunow and Cherubim for those who have knowledge about very high end steel japanese bikes know that they are outstanding bikes. As for carbon wheels and other things I am very nitpicking then again I don't think that BTLOS or Vision wheels are better than Boyd or Zipp or Bontrager wheels,that is due that I may have a very different notion and perception of quality than you have. I never expect quality from a cheap or an averagely priced product.
What about MEILENSTEIN LIGHTWEIGHT WHEELS?
seypat is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 07:18 PM
  #383  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Wilmette, IL
Posts: 6,889
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked 749 Times in 357 Posts

After a spirited ride I like to rib my friend..."So I paid $40 for my bike, and how much was it you paid for yours "?
big chainring is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 08:18 PM
  #384  
Senior Member
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 22,998

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 305 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26482 Post(s)
Liked 10,449 Times in 7,248 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
Oh, you think technology development is linear right?

I don’t actually know the history of bicycle development between 1940 and 1980 but I doubt it involved very much in terms of new technology and production processes. As an engineer, most of the major development appears to have occurred over the last 2 decades. Isn’t that why retro-grouches complain about all the non-standard proprietary parts we see today?
... qft. It's interesting you see proprietary parts as a positive development in this technology of bicycles. Meanwhile, the chain drive, derailleur shifted bike you ride around on is based on a drive train concept that was developed and perfected over those years you say you know nothing about. But now you can shift it with a servo motor. That's some high tech right there, boy.

Last edited by 3alarmer; 04-04-24 at 08:21 PM.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 04-04-24, 08:40 PM
  #385  
The Wheezing Geezer
 
Fredo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Española, NM
Posts: 1,127

Bikes: 1976 Fredo Speciale, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr., Libertas mixte

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 429 Post(s)
Liked 1,019 Times in 483 Posts
Originally Posted by Trakhak
That's putting it far too strongly.
That was sarcasm.

Originally Posted by Trakhak
The best bikes back then were beautiful and simple. I remember all the pro-level steel bikes that I rode and raced in the '60's, '70's, '80's, and '90's with pleasure and pride. That bikes have evolved since then takes nothing away from the past.
I agree wholeheartedly.
Fredo76 is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 08:57 PM
  #386  
Habitual User
 
Eric F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Altadena, CA
Posts: 8,254

Bikes: 2023 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2018 Trek Procaliber 9.9 RSL, 2018 Storck Fascenario.3 Platinum, 2003 Time VX Special Pro, 2001 Colnago VIP, 1999 Trek 9900 singlespeed, 1977 Nishiki ONP

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5111 Post(s)
Liked 8,440 Times in 3,984 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
Giant and Merida are taiwainese brands and make both fine bikes, as a fact I own two Giants and a Merida that I absolutely love. I am speaking about brands such as Cannondale and Trek who have outsourced their production, the quality of the welds on cannondales is not comparable to what was made in Bedford and for the Trek the OCLV HC was entirely made in the US not the case of today carbon made Treks, maybe I am nostalgic of a time that doesn't exist anymore. This is what I think is a forever debate, some are fine with newer stuff and some aren't adopting to it but to each their own .
How is Trek’s OCLV material made in USA different than Trek’s OCLV material made somewhere else?

I have a US-made Trek OCLV from 1999. I also have a 2018 Trek OCLV that is essentially the modern version of the old bike. As far as I can tell, there is nothing inferior about the newer bike.
__________________
"Swedish fish. They're protein shaped." - livedarklions
Eric F is offline  
Old 04-04-24, 11:18 PM
  #387  
Senior Member
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 22,998

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 305 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26482 Post(s)
Liked 10,449 Times in 7,248 Posts
Manchester CASH loan CUSTOMER CARE HELPLINE Number☎️/8807418515//❼3=❽❻❼=❾❺❷=❽❶-☄&. 1
...thankfully, the expensive prices on modern bikes have attracted a lot of new threads offering loans to buy them.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 04-05-24, 12:54 AM
  #388  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by seypat
What about MEILENSTEIN LIGHTWEIGHT WHEELS?
They are premium high quality wheels
georges1 is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 12:57 AM
  #389  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by Eric F
How is Trek’s OCLV material made in USA different than Trek’s OCLV material made somewhere else?

I have a US-made Trek OCLV from 1999. I also have a 2018 Trek OCLV that is essentially the modern version of the old bike. As far as I can tell, there is nothing inferior about the newer bike.
If you are happy with your new Trek that is fine. In the past trek marked their OCLV carbon frames OCLV HC110 and even OCLV HC120, I don't think it is the case anymore.
georges1 is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 04:31 AM
  #390  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,573
Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3261 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,535 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer
... qft. It's interesting you see proprietary parts as a positive development in this technology of bicycles. Meanwhile, the chain drive, derailleur shifted bike you ride around on is based on a drive train concept that was developed and perfected over those years you say you know nothing about. But now you can shift it with a servo motor. That's some high tech right there, boy.
Come on now. During that time they've added some cogs on the back, moved some load bearings around and relocated the shifters a few times. Definitely some high tech advancements.
seypat is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 04:57 AM
  #391  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,573
Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3261 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,535 Posts
Speaking of super high tech advancements, we've went from a multi piece adjustable stem/handlebar system of one material, to a multi piece adjustable system of another material, to a one piece non adjustable system of another material. The best part is, the one piece non adjustable system costs what, 10-15 times the cost of the previous systems. That's some real progress right there.

Last edited by seypat; 04-05-24 at 05:37 AM.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 04-05-24, 06:18 AM
  #392  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr
oof. Your posts often contain errors, but this is another level of incorrect comments and unrelated posting.
I apologize but I think that you are overexagerating a little bit, you are probably knowledgeable but I have rarely met people who have an encyclopedic knowledge regarding bikes. Everyone can make mistakes.
georges1 is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 06:22 AM
  #393  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,019

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3646 Post(s)
Liked 3,087 Times in 1,860 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
I apologize but I think that you are overexagerating a little bit, you are probably knowledgeable but I have rarely met people who have an encyclopedic knowledge regarding bikes. Everyone can make mistakes.
Your opinion that Columbus SLX tubing wasn't considered high end notwithstanding, I think your posts are pretty accurate and knowledgeable.
smd4 is online now  
Likes For smd4:
Old 04-05-24, 06:31 AM
  #394  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4
Your opinion that Columbus SLX tubing wasn't considered high end notwithstanding, I think your posts are pretty accurate and knowledgeable.
I appreciate your opinion and feedback greatly. We can't agree on everything sadly.I started to like columbus steels with the el, max and neuron steel series and later on with genius, nemo, foco and ultra foco and spirit steel series. I am also a Dedacciai and Reynolds fan too. To know what you are purchasing is important. A friend of mine bought a Cinelli Columbus Genius fillet brazed frame, he is going to equip it with the 25th Dura Ace Anniversary Group and with Dura Ace C50 wheels.
georges1 is offline  
Likes For georges1:
Old 04-05-24, 09:36 AM
  #395  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,859
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4632 Post(s)
Liked 5,167 Times in 3,195 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
If you are happy with your new Trek that is fine. In the past trek marked their OCLV carbon frames OCLV HC110 and even OCLV HC120, I don't think it is the case anymore.
Carbon frame layups have improved massively in the last 20 years. So wherever they were manufactured back then is really a moot point.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 04-05-24, 09:54 AM
  #396  
Habitual User
 
Eric F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Altadena, CA
Posts: 8,254

Bikes: 2023 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2018 Trek Procaliber 9.9 RSL, 2018 Storck Fascenario.3 Platinum, 2003 Time VX Special Pro, 2001 Colnago VIP, 1999 Trek 9900 singlespeed, 1977 Nishiki ONP

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5111 Post(s)
Liked 8,440 Times in 3,984 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
If you are happy with your new Trek that is fine. In the past trek marked their OCLV carbon frames OCLV HC110 and even OCLV HC120, I don't think it is the case anymore.
Trek has multiple different number designations for their OCLV material on their current bikes. What those numbers mean, I don't know. My 2018 Procaliber 9.9 RSL was indicated as "Super Light OCLV". This was the Pro Team frame, and made with their lighter weight OCLV material than the "standard" Procaliber frames. I don't have any reason to believe that the OCLV 110/120 materials from 20 years ago were superior to Trek's current OCLV materials. Like it has with others, I expect their CF technology has evolved. I suspect this has a lot to do with me not being hung up on thinking older, US-made products are always superior to new stuff made elsewhere. The transfer of knowledge and technology is not hindered by crossing oceans.
__________________
"Swedish fish. They're protein shaped." - livedarklions
Eric F is offline  
Likes For Eric F:
Old 04-05-24, 10:16 AM
  #397  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,859
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4632 Post(s)
Liked 5,167 Times in 3,195 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer
... qft. It's interesting you see proprietary parts as a positive development in this technology of bicycles. Meanwhile, the chain drive, derailleur shifted bike you ride around on is based on a drive train concept that was developed and perfected over those years you say you know nothing about. But now you can shift it with a servo motor. That's some high tech right there, boy.
The 5-speed downtube friction shifter derailleur drivetrains I rode in the early 1980s were far from perfection. Of course the basic derailleur concept is the same today, but not the actual parts and operation. Could they have produced the high-end bikes we see today back in 1980? If Shimano had offered a current Di2 12-speed drivetrain back in 1980 it would have looked like it came from another planet.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 10:26 AM
  #398  
Senior Member
 
Sierra_rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2023
Location: NorCal
Posts: 646

Bikes: Santa Cruz Blur 4 TR, Canyon Endurace cf sl, Canyon Ultimate cf slx, Canyon Strive enduro, Canyon Grizl sl8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Liked 1,162 Times in 441 Posts
Originally Posted by vespasianus
Carbon mountain bikes have become heavy as crap. My Ripley frame is over 3kg and the entire bike is 30lbs. I love that bike though - weight is pretty much irrelevant for a bikes performance.
I think the frames are lighter nowadays, it's just that the components may have become heavier. You start looking at XC bikes and they are still very lightweight, my Blur in the "downcountry" build with 120mm suspension, is in the 25lb range with alloy wheels. A top-shelf Santa Cruz, that the pros are racing in XCO, is about 23lbs. Sure, you could build a vintage rigid/hardtail to be lighter, but that vintage bike would get absolutely smoked on a modern race course.

I kinda also think about my Canyon Strive(carbon enduro bike with 160mm travel.) It's no flyweight at 34-35lbs, but it's much more dirt-cable than the 45-50lb downhill bikes I was riding nearly 20 years ago.
Sierra_rider is offline  
Old 04-05-24, 10:26 AM
  #399  
Senior Member
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 22,998

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 305 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26482 Post(s)
Liked 10,449 Times in 7,248 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
The 5-speed downtube friction shifter derailleur drivetrains I rode in the early 1980s were far from perfection. Of course the basic derailleur concept is the same today, but not the actual parts and operation. Could they have produced the high-end bikes we see today back in 1980? If Shimano had offered a current Di2 12-speed drivetrain back in 1980 it would have looked like it came from another planet.
...the improvements in tooth profile and shifting ramps, workable indexed shifting (that worked quite well), basically the stuff that makes Di 2 possible, was all well in place by 1980. I still have a couple of bikes that use Dura Ace indexed shifting from those years, and they shift flawlessly. 12 cogs on the back ? OK, I'm not even gonna go there.

I'm happy you are happy with your Di 2, genuinely happy. But the technology that makes it possible is all pretty old tech. Some of it is borrowed, like wireless signaling and small servo motors. The stuff that makes it possible on your hi tech bicycle as far as shifting between the gears using a chain as the drive ? That stuff has been around a while. I guess it benefitted from advances in battery tech and miniaturization...but that's not stuff the bicycle industry researched and developed. It's borrowed.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 04-05-24, 10:37 AM
  #400  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 6,019

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3646 Post(s)
Liked 3,087 Times in 1,860 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
The 5-speed downtube friction shifter derailleur drivetrains I rode in the early 1980s were far from perfection.
But you didn’t know that then. Back then, they were perfection.
smd4 is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.