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I Don't Care About Weight. Best Puncture Resistance Inner Tube?

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I Don't Care About Weight. Best Puncture Resistance Inner Tube?

Old 04-03-24, 09:03 AM
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19" tubular tire inside a 30" clincher tire.
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Old 04-03-24, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by XxHaimBondxX
They can't download anything without your permission and passcode. However, your daughter can just hand you the phone once she's home or something, your house your rules.
if she breaks down she can use someone elseís phone. The world isnít so scary that you cannot trust strangers. She just has to remember her dads phone number
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Old 04-03-24, 10:40 AM
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Farm tractors often have water or other liquid in the tires. They do it for ballast though. Also they typically only fill with 3/4 liquid and 1/4 air.
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Old 04-03-24, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz
if she breaks down she can use someone else’s phone. The world isn’t so scary that you cannot trust strangers. She just has to remember her dads phone number
I'm probably not the only one who thanked higher powers that you are childless.
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Old 04-04-24, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Unless you have a Tween or early teen child, I don't think you can comprehend the power phones have over developing children. Even with strict conditions, blocking social media etc, the phone will take over their lives. I don't care how good a parent you think you are. I have seen it happen too many times to my friend's children and my children's friends.

I am far less concerned about the potential dangers of my 11 yr old venturing 12m from home than I am from her having a phone. Of course, our location plays a part in this security.

I will heed the advice about ditching the liners and just go with the Marathon Plus. I do not wish to suck all the joy out of recreational biking.
I fully understand. That is why I suggested a phone that only makes calls, or texts, no browser, only primitive text, no pictures. https://www.fatherly.com/gear/these-...-well-thats-it
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Old 04-04-24, 12:34 PM
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Sound advice. But if Iím going to go that route, Iíd just get a GPS tracker instead. Those phones donít have GPS.
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Old 04-04-24, 12:35 PM
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Sound advice. But if I was going to go that route, Iíd get a GPS tracker instead. Those phones donít have GPS.
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Old 04-04-24, 12:45 PM
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you could consider something like a Garmin mini 2 that would allow emergency comms and tracking ,,, pricy https://www.rei.com/product/208257/g...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

just a thought: overall kids and phones are difficult.....but from what I have seen there needs to be a balance with kids between no control and over control (not just for phones but for everything) and it changes with age
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Old 04-05-24, 09:57 AM
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Best puncture resistance is to weigh 115 pounds; my wife has only had one puncture in the last 15 years of riding two or three times a week on Bontrager (AIR) thick tubes. I've been relatively lucky @ 175 with them too.
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Old 04-05-24, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Sound advice. But if I was going to go that route, Iíd get a GPS tracker instead. Those phones donít have GPS.
A GPS tracker doesn't allow her to call you when she needs help. What do you plan on doing, watching the tracker until it is stationary for a long time, then going to find her? Honestly though, I am certainly happy I grew up in a world without cell phones and constant monitoring.
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Old 04-07-24, 08:34 PM
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First of all, a puncture resistant tube is not very effective, it might stop 1 percent of the flats.

Secondly, puncture resistant tubes are made very poorly. I bought a pair of Sunlite tubes for my wife's Ebike, and both blew their seams. So, I bought a pair of Bontrager, both tubes separated at the valve and the base of the tube. These were horrible tubes.

Thirdly a puncture resistant tube can add 450 grams more weight than a standard tube, that's more than most tires!

What to do then instead of a tube you scream...buy a pair of Clear Motion Rhinodillos tire liners, these will work 100% better than any tube, and they weigh around 120 grams. The Rhinodillo comes with a soft edge on one edge of the tube so the tube can't chaff a hole into the tube.
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Old 04-08-24, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
I want these for my daughter's bike. She's venturing farther and farther from home. I have the Marathon GreenGuard tires on her bike
Don't care about weight? Best tube is an old tube, valve stem cut away, flattened, placed between the tire and your tube to be inflated. Now you have three layers of inner tube instead of one, between a pokey thing and the air inside the tube.

Also, use largest size tube possible, for less stretch when inflated, thus less thinning of tube. So for example, if you have 1.75" section tires and they make tubes for the ranges 1.5 - 1.75", and 1.75 - 2.0", use the latter.
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Old 04-08-24, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
yea, probably overthinking it but I ordered the Tannus Tube Sleeves. Some peace of mind if nothing else
Punctures are a matter of LUCK and OBSERVATION. I kidd you not. 5 of the 6 punctures ive had in the last 3 years were from night time riding. When I couldnt properly check the ground I'm riding on.

But you can go a year without a puncture. And then get two or three in one week. Worn tires are usually the culprit. Thorns and screws broken glass will get through them alot easier.
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Old 04-08-24, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
First of all, a puncture resistant tube is not very effective, it might stop 1 percent of the flats.

Secondly, puncture resistant tubes are made very poorly. I bought a pair of Sunlite tubes for my wife's Ebike, and both blew their seams. So, I bought a pair of Bontrager, both tubes separated at the valve and the base of the tube. These were horrible tubes.

Thirdly a puncture resistant tube can add 450 grams more weight than a standard tube, that's more than most tires!

What to do then instead of a tube you scream...buy a pair of Clear Motion Rhinodillos tire liners, these will work 100% better than any tube, and they weigh around 120 grams. The Rhinodillo comes with a soft edge on one edge of the tube so the tube can't chaff a hole into the tube.
I actually have an unopened pair of Rhino's for some 26" x 25mm 'Tom Slick' clinchers, for a racing recumbent that I am putting on the road this summer. That is a special use case that justifies this utilization. Otherwise, no. A reinforced tube, or tire liner is not superior to a reinforced tire, when not flatting is mission critical. When I put the Marathon Plus on our commute tandem (9mi r/t urban) I put 60psi in each and I haven't touched them since. When I remember I give them a squeeze, and they never seem to need any air. I gave them some anyway after like six months, because it was driving me crazy. Six months later (1/yr.) and they are still rock hard and, needless to say, not a single flat. So why buy a fragile tire and buck it up with a tire liner when buying a reinforced tire gives you the same end result in an easy to mount, care free product?
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Old 04-08-24, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
https://tannus.com/airless-tires/

The best way to not puncture an inner tube is to not have one to begin with.
Best way to do this is to have a tubeless tire setup with sealant.
Second best way to do this is to have tires that dont air up. You cant pop what isnt inflated.
Agree ^. The best puncture resistant tube is to get the best puncture resistant tire.

Originally Posted by Sentinel1
Punctures are a matter of LUCK and OBSERVATION. I kidd you not. 5 of the 6 punctures ive had in the last 3 years were from night time riding. When I couldnt properly check the ground I'm riding on.

But you can go a year without a puncture. And then get two or three in one week. Worn tires are usually the culprit. Thorns and screws broken glass will get through them alot easier.
Disagree ^. It is a matter of the tires itself. From my bike-riding experience, clearly, some tire makes and models do not provide more puncture resistance than other tire makes and models. I have tested and used two different tire makes on the front and rear tires to my bike, the front tire is yet to have a flat in 15 months and rear one had about 10 flats during the same time. Getting a puncture resistant tire is the best way to reduce and eliminate flat tires, and not worry about getting stranded on the side of the road and fixing flats on the tubes as often.
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Old 04-08-24, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
I actually have an unopened pair of Rhino's for some 26" x 25mm 'Tom Slick' clinchers, for a racing recumbent that I am putting on the road this summer. That is a special use case that justifies this utilization. Otherwise, no. A reinforced tube, or tire liner is not superior to a reinforced tire, when not flatting is mission critical. When I put the Marathon Plus on our commute tandem (9mi r/t urban) I put 60psi in each and I haven't touched them since. When I remember I give them a squeeze, and they never seem to need any air. I gave them some anyway after like six months, because it was driving me crazy. Six months later (1/yr.) and they are still rock hard and, needless to say, not a single flat. So why buy a fragile tire and buck it up with a tire liner when buying a reinforced tire gives you the same end result in an easy to mount, care free product?
Where did I say a liner was better than a reinforced tire?

The Rhino is actually better, tougher, and lighter than a Mr Tuffy. I tried to push a tack through a Rhino and the liner bent the tack, but it went easily through the Tuffy. I also was hurting my hand (arthritis thing) trying to cut the Rhino, but I cut the Tuffy like butter. The Rhino has that one end with a soft material applied to the edge so as not to chaff a hole into the tube like the Tuffy does, and it works because I used the Rhino for quite a few years on my touring bike and my former commuting, now RV camping bike, and never had a flat from external or internal causes.

On my touring bike I use Schwalbe Almotion tire, and I use the liners in both tires, because I don't want to be fixing a flat on a loaded touring bike if I can help it. The commuter/RV bike uses Specialized Roubaix Pro tires, but I only use the liner in the rear tire not the front. The rest of my bikes I don't use any liners even though they're less robust than those tires I spoke about.
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Old 04-08-24, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Eyes Roll
Agree ^. The best puncture resistant tube is to get the best puncture resistant tire.



Disagree ^. It is a matter of the tires itself. From my bike-riding experience, clearly, some tire makes and models do not provide more puncture resistance than other tire makes and models. I have tested and used two different tire makes on the front and rear tires to my bike, the front tire is yet to have a flat in 15 months and rear one had about 10 flats during the same time. Getting a puncture resistant tire is the best way to reduce and eliminate flat tires, and not worry about getting stranded on the side of the road and fixing flats on the tubes as often.
Your theory is in error. Between 80 to 90 percent of all flats occur on the rear tire, that's why you have less flats on the front then on the rear and not because you are using a better tire on the front.
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Old 04-08-24, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Duragrouch
Don't care about weight? Best tube is an old tube, valve stem cut away, flattened, placed between the tire and your tube to be inflated. Now you have three layers of inner tube instead of one, between a pokey thing and the air inside the tube.

Also, use largest size tube possible, for less stretch when inflated, thus less thinning of tube. So for example, if you have 1.75" section tires and they make tubes for the ranges 1.5 - 1.75", and 1.75 - 2.0", use the latter.
Now try sticking a tack through your 3 layers of tubes and see how easy that is to do.

Then try the same tack with a Rhino tire liner.

Then come back here and tell us which one worked the best, I already know the answer.

All you're doing is adding weight for no effective reason.
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Old 04-08-24, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Eyes Roll
Agree ^. The best puncture resistant tube is to get the best puncture resistant tire.



Disagree ^. It is a matter of the tires itself. From my bike-riding experience, clearly, some tire makes and models do not provide more puncture resistance than other tire makes and models. I have tested and used two different tire makes on the front and rear tires to my bike, the front tire is yet to have a flat in 15 months and rear one had about 10 flats during the same time. Getting a puncture resistant tire is the best way to reduce and eliminate flat tires, and not worry about getting stranded on the side of the road and fixing flats on the tubes as often.
Everything's a compromise. I tried Schwalbe Marathons. And didn't get any punctures. But the tires had too much rolling resistance for my liking. So I went back to Schwalbe ones and Kojaks. Continental contacts etc. If I get a puncture I can always jump on a bus or train. Or call uber. That's the beauty of folding bikes. You have OPTIONS.
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Old 04-08-24, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Your theory is in error. Between 80 to 90 percent of all flats occur on the rear tire, that's why you have less flats on the front then on the rear and not because you are using a better tire on the front.
Oh yaa, Professor?

I also ride another bike on a regular basis. After having satisfactory tire performance and experience on the first bike mentioned in my earlier post, I have replaced both front and rear tires on the second bike with the same make and model as the front tire (with 0 flats in a 15-month period) on the first bike, in September, 2023, and I am yet to have a flat on either front tire and rear tire on the second bike.

Let me tell you, I am hard to please, but I am sold on this particular make and model of bike tire, that I now came to the conclusion that I will not get a flat on these flats until the tire tread wears out and the tire reaches the tail end of its life.

Do you want me to let you all know about the make and model of the puncture-resistant bike tire I am referring to here?
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Old 04-08-24, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Now try sticking a tack through your 3 layers of tubes and see how easy that is to do.

Then try the same tack with a Rhino tire liner.

Then come back here and tell us which one worked the best, I already know the answer.

All you're doing is adding weight for no effective reason.
No argument, proper liners and strong belted tires are better. My extra tubage won't stop something sharp. But it does help in terms of thickness, I usually see a small shard or wire in my tire, before it reaches the air supply. Most of the puncture threats here are small shards of glass that I can't see to avoid, a piece of wire strand, a staplegun staple, the staple was sharp and deep enough to go fully through but luckily it bent over first, and I heard a funny sound.

Last edited by Duragrouch; 04-09-24 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 04-09-24, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Where did I say a liner was better than a reinforced tire?

The Rhino is actually better, tougher, and lighter than a Mr Tuffy. I tried to push a tack through a Rhino and the liner bent the tack, but it went easily through the Tuffy. I also was hurting my hand (arthritis thing) trying to cut the Rhino, but I cut the Tuffy like butter. The Rhino has that one end with a soft material applied to the edge so as not to chaff a hole into the tube like the Tuffy does, and it works because I used the Rhino for quite a few years on my touring bike and my former commuting, now RV camping bike, and never had a flat from external or internal causes.

On my touring bike I use Schwalbe Almotion tire, and I use the liners in both tires, because I don't want to be fixing a flat on a loaded touring bike if I can help it. The commuter/RV bike uses Specialized Roubaix Pro tires, but I only use the liner in the rear tire not the front. The rest of my bikes I don't use any liners even though they're less robust than those tires I spoke about.
Also that, I forgot to say in my older post that the Tuffys still wouldn't completely avoid flats, especially from thin car tire wires.
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Old 04-09-24, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Sentinel1
Everything's a compromise. I tried Schwalbe Marathons. And didn't get any punctures. But the tires had too much rolling resistance for my liking. So I went back to Schwalbe ones and Kojaks. Continental contacts etc. If I get a puncture I can always jump on a bus or train. Or call uber. That's the beauty of folding bikes. You have OPTIONS.
This thread is about an 11-year-old girl riding a bike that her father purchased for her and being safe. I highly doubt she's going to have the option of hailing a cab.

I do think giving her a cheap flip phone for emergencies would be a good idea. No chance of getting into social media that way, thus preventing possible issues down the line. As for tires, those Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tour 700X40 tires should hold up nicely and provide a bit of cushion.
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Old 04-09-24, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Eyes Roll
Oh yaa, Professor?

I also ride another bike on a regular basis. After having satisfactory tire performance and experience on the first bike mentioned in my earlier post, I have replaced both front and rear tires on the second bike with the same make and model as the front tire (with 0 flats in a 15-month period) on the first bike, in September, 2023, and I am yet to have a flat on either front tire and rear tire on the second bike.

Let me tell you, I am hard to please, but I am sold on this particular make and model of bike tire, that I now came to the conclusion that I will not get a flat on these flats until the tire tread wears out and the tire reaches the tail end of its life.

Do you want me to let you all know about the make and model of the puncture-resistant bike tire I am referring to here?
Well let me tell you what you need to do jackass! My response was about your claim that most flats are on the front, that's not true, I don't give a rats ass about your tires or bikes, I was responding to that one statement you made. You need to go on line and asked Quora, because you're not going to believe me, because you're a jackass that refuses to do any research before acting like a jackass. Ask quora which tire the front or the rear on a bicycle gets the most percentage of flats.

Now report me, most babies will, then I'll be gone for good and I won't have put up with nonsense from the likes of you!
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Old 04-09-24, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Well let me tell you what you need to do jackass! My response was about your claim that most flats are on the front, that's not true, I don't give a rats ass about your tires or bikes, I was responding to that one statement you made. You need to go on line and asked Quora, because you're not going to believe me, because you're a jackass that refuses to do any research before acting like a jackass. Ask quora which tire the front or the rear on a bicycle gets the most percentage of flats.

Now report me, most babies will, then I'll be gone for good and I won't have put up with nonsense from the likes of you!
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