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Why do many bicycle manufacturers not list the weights on their bikes?

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Why do many bicycle manufacturers not list the weights on their bikes?

Old 03-30-24, 09:45 PM
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Why do many bicycle manufacturers not list the weights on their bikes?

Hi!

I'm interested in buying the 2025 "New Giant TCR but neither that model or previous TCR models are listed with weight on the web in their specification. For me its like show me what you have in detail, and you have a potential buyer, if not its turn around.
Rant over.
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Old 03-30-24, 11:09 PM
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That's like trying to give a catalog weight to humans by demographics.

There are infinitely too many factors.

Consider something simple. Every rider chooses their tyres. Tyres can vary by weight vastly. TPU vs latex? Tyre liner or not?

Same goes with saddles, seat posts, pedals, cable housing. Basically if it can be removed from the bike, it has its own weight.

Another thing I can think of is change in manufacturing. The "same" bike can indeed vary by weight, and wrong would still be wrong in this woke day and age. Manufacturers don't want to defend themselves just because someone caught them underweighing a bike by 50 grams.

A LBS would be more than happy to help a buyer using a scale in their store, this has never been an issue.
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Old 03-30-24, 11:54 PM
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Every frame size varies in weight. They also swap parts, tires, etc…. Over a product line, thus weights for a given size will vary.
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Old 03-31-24, 12:01 AM
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Because if it’s not the lightest at the price point it’s a disadvantage.
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Old 03-31-24, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by soyabean
That's like trying to give a catalog weight to humans by demographics.

There are infinitely too many factors.

Consider something simple. Every rider chooses their tyres. Tyres can vary by weight vastly. TPU vs latex? Tyre liner or not?

Same goes with saddles, seat posts, pedals, cable housing. Basically if it can be removed from the bike, it has its own weight.

Another thing I can think of is change in manufacturing. The "same" bike can indeed vary by weight, and wrong would still be wrong in this woke day and age. Manufacturers don't want to defend themselves just because someone caught them underweighing a bike by 50 grams.

A LBS would be more than happy to help a buyer using a scale in their store, this has never been an issue.

No, it does not hold water. It's like saying that when a car manufacturer states a weight for a certain model, spesific engine and size that they can't do it because maybe the buyer puts on different tires (heavier/lighter), extra lights and installs a big music system in the car. Well, I'm talking about the specified weight of each specific model before the buyer makes their modifications. Withholding information about the product is the kindest thing I call it.
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Old 03-31-24, 03:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve B.
Every frame size varies in weight. They also swap parts, tires, etc…. Over a product line, thus weights for a given size will vary.
The ones that do list weights will just specify frame size. Usually size med. I know Ibis, Specialized and Santa Cruz list their weights.
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Old 03-31-24, 04:16 AM
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Years of previous threads on the topic of bike weights, including the "why don't manufacturers list bike weights?" topic.

Example from one of those threads:

"The issue is that if they get it wrong and underestimate, then they could be liable for the "false" claims of lightness. Strikes me that there's a comparatively high margin of error in the components and the subcomponents (tape, spoke nipples, chain lube, bearings?) and that companies don't find that risk worth it."

Last edited by Trakhak; 03-31-24 at 04:20 AM.
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Old 03-31-24, 04:57 AM
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Giant say this about bike weights:-

“The most accurate way to determine any bike’s weight is to have your local dealer weigh it for you. Many brands strive to list the lowest possible weight, but in reality weight can vary based on size, finish, hardware and accessories. All our bikes are designed for best-in-class weight and ride quality”

Some other manufacturers do list specific weights for each model and spec eg Canyon.

Personally, I think it would be useful to list comparative weights of their various models and spec options. They could add a disclaimer for legal protection, but Canyon don’t appear to have one. But they don’t list specific bike weights for all frame sizes. They just list a single weight for each bike model and component build spec.
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Old 03-31-24, 05:05 AM
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Originally Posted by sean.hwy
The ones that do list weights will just specify frame size. Usually size med. I know Ibis, Specialized and Santa Cruz list their weights.
To his point, Spec also notes this:

* Weights based on production painted frames as pictured. Actual weights will vary based on colorway, frame size, and component variation. Specifications are subject to change without notice.”
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Old 03-31-24, 05:22 AM
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If you Google the weight of any specific bike you can usually get a good idea from reviews and forum chat. For this bike, frame weight is apparently 690g and their flagship complete bike is 6.4 kg. This was a 5 sec Google for “2025 Gisnt TCR weight”.
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Old 03-31-24, 07:38 AM
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Every bike doesn't list weight because it isn't all that important in those particular models. Anyone obsessed about getting the lightest possible bike in the style they want will gravitate towards particular bikes designed on purpose to be light. For those bikes it's pretty easy to find weight. For similar bikes with similar weights, it really doesn't matter. You aren't going to tell much difference between a 35 lb. bike and a 32 lb. bike. You will tell a huge difference between a 35 lb. bike and an 18 lb. bike; both in riding and especially in price.
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Old 03-31-24, 07:57 AM
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Unless you are racing, what is the issue over weight?
I'm a bigger guy, I would want a heavier duty frame and wheelset that would weigh more.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR
Unless you are racing, what is the issue over weight?
I'm a bigger guy, I would want a heavier duty frame and wheelset that would weigh more.
Myself, for example, I've got old injuries where having to heft around a heavier bike can get problematic. The difference of a half dozen pounds on a daily-used bike can make quite a bit of difference. A lighter bike can strain the injury areas less ... a really big deal, for some injuries.

"Weight-weenie" stuff is a whole other kettle of fish.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by hsea17
No, it does not hold water. It's like saying that when a car manufacturer states a weight for a certain model, spesific engine and size that they can't do it because maybe the buyer puts on different tires (heavier/lighter), extra lights and installs a big music system in the car. Well, I'm talking about the specified weight of each specific model before the buyer makes their modifications. Withholding information about the product is the kindest thing I call it.
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I don't think they are referring to changes the customers make, but rather changes that may occur in production of the bike and it's components. Over time they change what components they use also the component manufacturers may supply different weight items especially for items like tires where the same model may vary in weight over time and production runs.

Also they may not want to lies or at least misleads about weight, but also not be unfavorably compared to another brand who does. Weighing one on the showroom floor or getting a report from a reputable review or someone you trust is probably better than counting in the listed weight any way.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR
Unless you are racing, what is the issue over weight?
I'm a bigger guy, I would want a heavier duty frame and wheelset that would weigh more.
If you are comparing different build specs of the same bike, then weight is one of the main parameters that will differentiate them. Same applies when comparing aero vs climbing road bikes. It’s just useful to know what those weight differences actually are. I think some manufacturers are just lazy in not bothering to list specific build weights. I don’t think Giant are trying to hide anything in this case. I’m sure the TCR is competitively light, but it would be nice to compare the various build weights without having to Google it.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
I don't think they are referring to changes the customers make, but rather changes that may occur in production of the bike and its components. Over time they change what components they use also the component manufacturers may supply different weight items especially for items like tires where the same model may vary in weight over time and production runs
Yep. See the Specialized disclaimer in post #9. I copied it directly from its official website.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR
Unless you are racing, what is the issue over weight?
+1 this.

And even if you are racing, UCI imposes a minimum weight for bikes used in their sanctioned events.
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Old 03-31-24, 08:46 AM
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In summary: Nothing to gain & a whole lot to lose.

What weight & where is perhaps a more important metric anyway. A 9 pound crank set is going to feel and ride different than a 9 pound saddle or handlebar.

If you want weights, you gotta buy a bike by individual components.
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Old 03-31-24, 09:13 AM
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Just because we are the way we are, Mrs. Dan and I decided to weigh some nominally identical cans of beverages. We used a calibrated scale accurate to 0.1 grams.

The weights were+- 5 grams. Now, add up those tolerances on something small like a bicycle and you will have a weight range. Since too many people are clueless, the manufacturer is just asking for trouble if they post a single weight.

All of the wheel sets I have bought listed the weight to some tolerance, like +- 40 grams. That gives them a bit of wiggle room, and gives me an actionable measurement.

If you are really concerned, and you want to know +- 0.1 grams, maybe get a pair of reasonable quality scales and weigh the particular bike.
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Old 03-31-24, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
+1 this.

And even if you are racing, UCI imposes a minimum weight for bikes used in their sanctioned events.
That’s the truth- all of these high end UCI compliant road bikes probably all weigh just south of 6.8kg.

Nonetheless the OP is right. If carmakers can publish curb weights for all their cars there is no reason why bike makers avoid doing so.
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Old 03-31-24, 10:34 AM
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This is an excellent article from R+E cycles who have had a bike shop since the 70s and have been making bicycles in that time as well.

https://www.rodbikes.com/articles/we...-a-minute.html

I wouldn't trust published weights from any manufacturer because of the variations in everything and their want to sell the product. I could say get a production sample to 13lbs but the actual bike rideable is 16lbs which one are you going to want to here? You like the idea of lightweight but the bike is heavier in real life. A road bike for instance should have handlebar tape, tubes and tires, a saddle and all of the bolts normally there. If you are weighing it without that stuff or some of it you are lying and it doesn't help anyone in that situation.

In truth bike weight really doesn't matter too much to most people in reality yes we love a ultralight bike but in truth riding it we won't notice to a point so why obsess over it. Especially with a manufacturer. If you are concerned your local shop will likely be able to weigh it but even then it is a production bike so if you are super concerned with weight you probably won't be buying a production bike (maybe a frame) because production bikes generally are built to hold up to a wide variety of people so they will probably be heavier and more overbuilt for a weight weenie.
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Old 03-31-24, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by sean.hwy
The ones that do list weights will just specify frame size.
Scott always lists the complete bike weight (approximate). For the Addict RC Pro:


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Old 03-31-24, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak

Example from one of those threads:

"The issue is that if they get it wrong and underestimate, then they could be liable for the "false" claims of lightness. Strikes me that there's a comparatively high margin of error in the components and the subcomponents (tape, spoke nipples, chain lube, bearings?) and that companies don't find that risk worth it."
Years of threads dont help much, if the threads are full of absurd claims like the one you cited.
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Old 03-31-24, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by CAT7RDR
Unless you are racing, what is the issue over weight?
Unless you are a professional model, what is the issue over how you look?
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Old 03-31-24, 10:54 AM
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The bicycle industry is somewhat self defeating in this.

For years weight has been a significant driver in selling higher end bikes.

Even with components, there will be some slight performance benefits going from 105 to Dura Ace. But finish and weight is generally touted. The downside is longevity might not be any better.

Wheelsets are even more dubious with separate training and racing sets while many in the real world tout little advantage for a lower weight for the average cyclist.

I acknowledge there is a difference between a recreational and professional. But for an industry that seems to rely on weight reduction as an upsell benefit, it sure doesn’t want to lie in the bed they made.

John
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