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Why No Comfort All Trail Type Bikes With Top End Gearing?

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Why No Comfort All Trail Type Bikes With Top End Gearing?

Old 04-10-24, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I see this sentiment thrown out a lot on these forums, and I have to disagree. Sure, everyone is entitled to their own aesthetic preferences, but angled stems are very useful, and we install them for customers on tons of new bikes at my shop (including FX6). Honestly most buyers of this kind of bicycle will benefit from a slightly higher bar, and many concerns posted about here on BF could be easily addressed with this solution.

To the OP - the FX6 sounds like a great fit for what youíre looking for. I wouldnít sweat the drivetrain differences too much, as shifting under load still isnít a great habit with eTap, and a little practice with shifting technique will make it a moot point anyway. That said, if you want electronic shifting, thereís no reason not to outfit this bike with it.
Yes I throw that sentiment out a lot.

However if one plans on doing that to a bike that they are purchasing, then they are purchasing the wrong bike. They should be looking at models of a bike that are intended to give the higher bar height that the purchaser is desiring. And for the most part, that is bikes that will have a higher frame stack than others.

For people that have naively purchased a bike that isn't designed to give them higher bar height they want, they have to do what they have to do. But that bike they bought for it's looks, no longer has the looks they bought it for. At least not to me.
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Old 04-10-24, 02:35 PM
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Hardtail mtn bike an option? Bought mine last year with Eagle drivetrain that I converted to AXS this spring--SRAM sells a complete kit that bypasses buying the bits separately. The bike itself does everything well, including tooling around town, so I'm happy with the combo.

A thought.
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Old 04-10-24, 03:02 PM
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Yes! I considered a Mountain Bike. One with full suspension like the super light ScalpelCarbon SE Ultimate that comes with the SRAM eTap AXS

With a narrower /hybrid tire wouldnít this be a good and comfortable city road bike ? Itís very light. The susp barely adds any lbs.


I get that itís built for hardcore trails though so would geometry and susp be a huge issue to getting it comfortable for city riding?

Last edited by MikeDeason; 04-10-24 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 04-10-24, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Yes I throw that sentiment out a lot.

However if one plans on doing that to a bike that they are purchasing, then they are purchasing the wrong bike. They should be looking at models of a bike that are intended to give the higher bar height that the purchaser is desiring. And for the most part, that is bikes that will have a higher frame stack than others.

For people that have naively purchased a bike that isn't designed to give them higher bar height they want, they have to do what they have to do. But that bike they bought for it's looks, no longer has the looks they bought it for. At least not to me.
I disagree here too. Itís normal practice to make slight changes to a new bike to dial it in, and this includes stem swaps. And itís a simple truth that many non-competitive riders find a slightly higher handlebar more comfortable. As for buying a bike based on looks, thatís exactly what Iím cautioning against here.
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Old 04-10-24, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I disagree here too. Itís normal practice to make slight changes to a new bike to dial it in, and this includes stem swaps. And itís a simple truth that many non-competitive riders find a slightly higher handlebar more comfortable. As for buying a bike based on looks, thatís exactly what Iím cautioning against here.
Why? I would never buy a bike that I didn't like the look of.
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Old 04-10-24, 04:28 PM
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I don't care too much about looks. Please take no offence but race-style bikes on city paths look weird to me, like a Ferrari in a school zone. A horrible mustard yellow color may turn me off but otherwise, I'm open to the look that gets me what I want on the ride.

I'm planning on either duct or electrical taping or somehow wrapping any identifying branding to hopefully bring less notice to the bike. I don't want to attract the wrong kind of attention, especially in our city's current climate.
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Old 04-10-24, 05:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Eric F
Why? I would never buy a bike that I didn't like the look of.
I donít mean to say looks shouldnít be a factor. My original point was that one shouldnít be deterred from putting a 35 degree stem on their bike, to make it more comfortable, because other folks think it looks bad.
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Old 04-10-24, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
I'm planning on either duct or electrical taping or somehow wrapping any identifying branding to hopefully bring less notice to the bike. I don't want to attract the wrong kind of attention, especially in our city's current climate.
No need to risk permanently damaging the bike's paint job. Go to a local bike shop or co-op and grab a few of the punctured tubes that they throw out most days. Split them lengthwise, wrap the frame tubing, use electrical tape to secure the ends.
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Old 04-11-24, 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I disagree here too. It’s normal practice to make slight changes to a new bike to dial it in, and this includes stem swaps. And it’s a simple truth that many non-competitive riders find a slightly higher handlebar more comfortable. As for buying a bike based on looks, that’s exactly what I’m cautioning against here.
That's essentially what I'm cautioning against too. While swaps of stem length are reasonable. Raising the bars more than is already given by the 40mm or so of spacers under the stem is just a sign that the person is looking at the wrong bike and probably for the simple reason that low stack road bikes just have a natural appeal to them in looks.

Road bikes look fugly with a upturned stem. Plain and simple. I might be wrong but you'll be hard pressed to find a road bike that comes with a stem angled upward. Any other type bike and you can find upward angled stems on them. So from the design aesthetics perspective, I feel confident that I'm not the only one that dislikes that look.

So again, if one is looking for a new to them road bike, and suspects that they'll have to put a stem on it that angles upward to give them the bar height they want, then they are looking at the wrong model road bike.
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Old 04-11-24, 09:53 AM
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Well, after visiting 2 bike shops this morning I'm flip-flopping again and ordering an Orbea Alma M-Ltd with the rigid fork and the SRAM Eagle AXS. It was sold to me as a good mix of gravel/road with the right tire and seating adjustments that I am assured will be included once the bike arrives. Here's hoping as it's a custom order so no returns.
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Old 04-11-24, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
That's essentially what I'm cautioning against too. While swaps of stem length are reasonable. Raising the bars more than is already given by the 40mm or so of spacers under the stem is just a sign that the person is looking at the wrong bike and probably for the simple reason that low stack road bikes just have a natural appeal to them in looks.

Road bikes look fugly with a upturned stem. Plain and simple. I might be wrong but you'll be hard pressed to find a road bike that comes with a stem angled upward. Any other type bike and you can find upward angled stems on them. So from the design aesthetics perspective, I feel confident that I'm not the only one that dislikes that look.

So again, if one is looking for a new to them road bike, and suspects that they'll have to put a stem on it that angles upward to give them the bar height they want, then they are looking at the wrong model road bike.
However you feel about road bikes (still a subjective opinion), the bike in question is a flat bar hybrid.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
However you feel about road bikes (still a subjective opinion), the bike in question is a flat bar hybrid.
Two bikes are in question. One is a road bike. However from the get go buying a new bike, it would still seem to me that having to buy another stem to raise the bar should be a indication that the stack height on that flat bar bike may not be high enough. There are road bikes that have a higher stack and a much higher bar height for the tops of the drop bar and the hoods than does the FX.

And if a flat bar is truly desired, then there are hybrid flat bar bikes with higher frame stack and bars.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Well, after visiting 2 bike shops this morning I'm flip-flopping again and ordering an Orbea Alma M-Ltd with the rigid fork and the SRAM Eagle AXS. It was sold to me as a good mix of gravel/road with the right tire and seating adjustments that I am assured will be included once the bike arrives. Here's hoping as it's a custom order so no returns.
That's an interesting bike. With efficient rolling tires, it could be a pretty quick urban bike. Swap to a suspension fork and big tires, and you get a pretty capable hardtail MTB. Keep in mind that 29" MTB tires have the same bead diameter as 700c tires, which means "gravel" tires will be an option for you, as will wide "road" tires. I'm seeing that it has rims with a 30mm internal width, so you'll probably want to run a tire at least 35mm wide. Based on what you've described you want, it sounds like you've made a good choice for yourself.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Two bikes are in question. One is a road bike. However from the get go buying a new bike, it would still seem to me that having to buy another stem to raise the bar should be a indication that the stack height on that flat bar bike may not be high enough. There are road bikes that have a higher stack and a much higher bar height for the tops of the drop bar and the hoods than does the FX.

And if a flat bar is truly desired, then there are hybrid flat bar bikes with higher frame stack and bars.
Iím sorry, but itís silly to suggest that someone shouldnít consider a particular bike if they want a different stem. Body shapes and proportions differ a lot, and bikes only come in so many sizes and configurations. Years ago, when threaded stems were the norm, would you have told someone they were buying the wrong bike if they wanted to adjust the stem height? If someone is buying a road bike, want wants to change the handlebar for one with shallower drops, are they also buying the wrong bike?
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Old 04-11-24, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I donít mean to say looks shouldnít be a factor. My original point was that one shouldnít be deterred from putting a 35 degree stem on their bike, to make it more comfortable, because other folks think it looks bad.
While I do agree that proper bike fit is critical, I would be deterred from doing that, because I think it looks awful. That said, I'm thankful to still have the flexibility to ride bikes with a pretty racy seat-handlebar drop. I understand that some people are built differently, and have different opinions about appearance.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Well, after visiting 2 bike shops this morning I'm flip-flopping again and ordering an Orbea Alma M-Ltd with the rigid fork and the SRAM Eagle AXS. It was sold to me as a good mix of gravel/road with the right tire and seating adjustments that I am assured will be included once the bike arrives. Here's hoping as it's a custom order so no returns.
Isn't that a high end XC race bike? I'm sure it will be a nice ride on dirt roads and mild trails, even fully rigid. Not criticizing, just seems like a long way from where you started.
I'm hoping you love it and please post some pics when you get it a little dirty.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
Iím sorry, but itís silly to suggest that someone shouldnít consider a particular bike if they want a different stem. Body shapes and proportions differ a lot, and bikes only come in so many sizes and configurations. Years ago, when threaded stems were the norm, would you have told someone they were buying the wrong bike if they wanted to adjust the stem height? If someone is buying a road bike, want wants to change the handlebar for one with shallower drops, are they also buying the wrong bike?
I don't think it's a question of raising the bar or changing the stem. What I think is being questioned is making huge changes to the bike to try and make it work when it might not have been the right size or model to begin with.

As someone with unusual fit preferences I understand the need to do things that might not be aesthetically pleasing to everyone but I also don't want some weird contraption looking thing, like 70mm of spacers, for example.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I’m sorry, but it’s silly to suggest that someone shouldn’t consider a particular bike if they want a different stem. Body shapes and proportions differ a lot, and bikes only come in so many sizes and configurations. Years ago, when threaded stems were the norm, would you have told someone they were buying the wrong bike if they wanted to adjust the stem height? If someone is buying a road bike, want wants to change the handlebar for one with shallower drops, are they also buying the wrong bike?
I'm suggesting that they look for a bike that best fits their needs that requires no changes or minimal changes. And for bikes that won't cause me to have to lie to them and say it looks nice when they show me how they fugged up the looks of it with a weirdly angled stem to get the bars way higher than the aesthetics on that bike allow.

It's easier to lower bars than it is to raise bars over the max they were designed for. And even with a simple steeply angled stem, they may just be getting into the range that they want the bar to be. So again a bike with a higher stack will allow them more choice of finding the perfect bar height for them.

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Old 04-11-24, 10:40 AM
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Yes. It looks like it might work with the right tire and seating adjustments


plus I was able to order it with black frame and black decals so it should be nondescript. My commute takes me through some sketchy areas.
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Old 04-11-24, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by big john
I don't think it's a question of raising the bar or changing the stem. What I think is being questioned is making huge changes to the bike to try and make it work when it might not have been the right size or model to begin with.

As someone with unusual fit preferences I understand the need to do things that might not be aesthetically pleasing to everyone but I also don't want some weird contraption looking thing, like 70mm of spacers, for example.
I guess I just donít consider a 35 degree stem a huge change
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Old 04-11-24, 11:19 AM
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A lot also depends on how close you are to "average" in your dimensions. If you've got really long legs but a short torso and/or arms, then you might go with a smaller frame than your inseam would suggest, but that gives you lower stack height and to get comfortable you might need a stack of spacers and an upturned stem. But if that's your problem, you'd want to go for a bike that already has a fairly high stack and short reach. Putting the guy I've just described on a downsized aero bike, then having to raise the bars several inches just looks... off.
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Old 04-11-24, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
Yes. It looks like it might work with the right tire and seating adjustments


plus I was able to order it with black frame and black decals so it should be nondescript. My commute takes me through some sketchy areas.
I agree with Eric F above: given your stated riding goals/preferences and that you were set on a 'higher end' bike, your choice makes a lot of sense.
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Old 04-11-24, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
I guess I just donít consider a 35 degree stem a huge change
Sometimes you have to do things that might not please others. I had a 45 degree stem on a mountain bike. The front end was just too low.
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Old 04-11-24, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by big john
Sometimes you have to do things that might not please others. I had a 45 degree stem on a mountain bike. The front end was just too low.
Exactly the point Iíve been trying to make.
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Old 04-11-24, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Eric F
I don't think the OP is a troll. I think the OP is just new to it all, and still learning about bicycle terminology.
You might want to look through their post history before you rush to defend them. Even then, this one thread. Whee doggie. What a mess. New to it all? I don't think so. People that talk about carbon framesets and electronic shifting are not, 'new to it all' and should deffo know most of the basic vernacular and conventions. No excuse for all of this confusion and the enemies it creates.
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